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18 posts tagged "Lisa Mayock"

Vena Cava’s Heartland Horror

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Vena Cava’s Sophie Buhai and Lisa Mayock were inspired by 1970s neo noir films for their Fall collection, so it was only fitting that they create one of their own. They joined forces with Josh and Benny Safdie of Red Bucket Films (“they are some of the last people making New York cinema the way it was done in the seventies”) and enlisted a gaggle of their girlfriends (including Langley Hemingway and Eléonore Hendricks) to play the cult girls in their horror flick, entitled Heartland. “The film references a lot of cults from seventies L.A., a darker time in history,” they tell Style.com. “We intentionally did not want product shots or a ‘fashion film’ thing going on. We set out to make a movie that could stand on its own outside of the fashion audience.” Here, we debut the movie trailer exclusively on Style.com, and your average fashion it is not. “We did some pretty intense gore scenes in my mother’s kitchen—at one point, the whole floor was covered in fake blood we had purchased at gore shops in the San Fernando Valley,” they add. “Horror is much messier art than fashion!”

Vena Cava: One Part L.A., One Part New York

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Though a bout with the stomach flu kept her partner Lisa Mayock sidelined, Vena Cava’s Sophie Buhai (pictured, left) was delighted to celebrate her own return home to Los Angeles last night among friends and muses. Hosted by GenArt, the party marked the launch of their Fall collection at Barneys and their strong ongoing working relationship with the retailer. “We really see Vena Cava as being half L.A. and half NY; it’s part of the brand DNA,” Buhai explained of the design duo’s new dynamic now that she lives in Los Angeles and Mayock remains in New York. “We’ve been exposed to different environments, and when we come together to design, they come together and meld in an interesting way.”

Set against the backdrop of Chateau Marmont’s Bungalow 1, a subtle reference to the designer’s neo-noir-inspired Fall collection, guests including Malin Akerman, Into the Gloss’ Emily Weiss, Cher Coulter, and Sophia Bush caught a poolside performance from St. Vincent’s Annie Clark (pictured, right), for which Vena Cava designed an exclusive T-shirt. And while there was an exciting emphasis on the brand’s SoCal heritage (both Buhai and Mayock are L.A. natives), Busy Philipps reflected that their resonance is a result of their ability to draw from both coasts. “I have this older Vena Cava LBD that is very simple but has some great detail that sets it apart, which is the reason I keep going back to it again and again,” Phillips said. “It’s the only dress that my friend Michelle [Williams], who lives in Brooklyn, and I both own and both wear.”

Photo: John Sciulli /WireImage

Still Very Vena Cava

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Vena Cava is making headlines today for its new business partnership with Li — Fung. Despite the deal with the group, which also backs brands like Rachel Zoe, Ellen Tracy, and Keds Apparel, designers Sophie Buhai and Lisa Mayock remain in full creative control of their eight-year-old label. And their latest collection shows it: They’ve maintained their Vena Cava aesthetic, delicate and modern with a vintage twist. To see the full collection and read Style.com’s review, click here.

Photos: Courtesy of Vena Cava

Maggie Gyllenhaal Strikes A Pose For Vena Cava

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Vena Cava’s Sophie Buhai and Lisa Mayock didn’t have their show as usual this season, opting instead to have their celebrity friends, including Nora Zehetner and Tennessee Thomas, model their forties-esque clothing in their Spring ’12 lookbook. If you thought you had already seen all the looks, think again. Today, Style.com shares a few more offerings from the duo, modeled by Maggie Gyllenhaal.

“Maggie was our ideal woman to represent Vena Cava,” Mayock tells Style.com. “She’s a movie star in the traditional sense, but also has the modern-day qualities we admire and adore in friends, collaborators, and accomplices.”

Photo: Jason Frank Rothenberg

From Public School To The Fashion Trenches

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For a girl not even finished with college—she’s got a semester left at Columbia—Lily Kwong has a pretty fair number of achievements already under her belt. She’s worked at the studio of her cousin, Joseph Altuzarra; in magazines, at GQ; kept an enviably packed social calendar; and modeled on the runways. But if that weren’t all enough, there’s her latest project, working with public school kids with the nonprofit JAM (Jamboree for Arts and Music). Produced by Nuvana—a gaming development company that has produced educational games for Nickelodeon and PBS—JAM creates arts-centric assignments for students (everything from creating a piece of public art to visiting a local museum exhibition and reinterpreting a piece), which can then be shared via its own social network. Partnering with local institutions during the pilot run, JAM sent kids to sites like the Bronx Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, and the New Museum in New York, and SFMoMA and the De Young Museum in San Francisco.

Over the weekend, the highest-achieving participants in the program were invited to the first JAM Lab, a day-long workshop focused on producing a photo shoot, taking its cues from a world Kwong knows well: fashion editorial. Mentors like Garance Doré, Vena Cava’s Lisa Mayock, Shipley & Halmos’ Sam Shipley, model Claudia Mason, and performance artist Ryan McNamara stopped by to offer their advice on shooting, styling, and posing. “With arts and music programs dwindling in public schools, we need [JAM] more than ever now,” Kwong said by phone yesterday. “You could really feel that at the JAM Lab event—these kids were so hungry to express themselves and create something. They’re just so inspired by seeing people who make art for a living.”

Drawing in the experts turned out to be easy. “When I asked them, everyone right away said of course,” Kwong said. “Everyone has a story about their first teacher who made an impact on them, or the first time they realized their creative potential. I think everyone walked away feeling really excited to be a part of it.” The amateurs turned out to have plenty to offer their advisers, too. “Fashion has a particular logic and the kids turned it on its head. The kids thought about things we hadn’t thought about, were using props in ways we weren’t expecting, framing things in interesting ways. I think a lot of our mentors walked away with good ideas for upcoming shoots and projects.”

For more information on JAM and Nuvana, visit www.jam4art.org or www.nuvana.org.

Photos: Olivia Barad