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4 posts tagged "Lola Schnabel"

Ferragamo’s Fiamma: Finally, Something Mothers and Daughters Can Agree On

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Sometimes a bag is more than just a bag. Maybe your mom passed it down to you, or you purchased it together on one of your many successful shopping ventures. (Come to think of it, when is the last time you didn’t ask for your mom’s approval before buying something?) Salvatore Ferragamo’s new Fiamma handbag collection was designed with the mother-daughter relationship in mind, along with the concepts of heritage, legacy, and multigenerational style. Named for Salvatore Ferragamo’s daughter, the bags have something for everyone: They combine classic Ferragamo signatures your mom would adore (i.e., silk print linings from the seventies, novelty hardware, and mixed exotic skins) with playful new shapes for the younger set. With countless sizes and finishes available (like snakeskin, pony hair, and fringy leather), rest assured you won’t match. To celebrate the Fiamma launch, Ferragamo created a sweet film about chic mother-daughter duos around the world, including Hanayo and Tenko Nakajima; Stella, Lola, and Jacqueline Schnabel; and Mariel and Langley Fox Hemingway—just in time for Mother’s Day. The film offers an intimate glimpse into the women’s relationships, consistently reminding us of our own stylish, loving moms. Mariel Hemingway, for instance, cites creativity as one of her family’s greatest features. “There’s an overwhelming sense of free spirit in the entire family,” she says. “I mean, Langley’s perspective is so unique to her, she is so uniquely herself. As a mother, it’s cool to see your children express themselves and become individuals in their own right.” We would hope our mothers had such nice things to say about us. See the full video, above, debuting exclusively here on Style.com, and visit ferragamo.com for more information on the bags.

Kowabunga!

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If today’s sunny New York weather is any indication, summer’s just around the corner. And Tommy Hilfiger is well-prepared for the warm days ahead. On May 15, the designer will launch a his and hers Surf Shack capsule, which consists of punchy beach-ready wares in shades of fuchsia, cherry, citrus, lime, and aqua. Highlights include easy denim shirts, brightly hued wedges, a cheeky little sky-blue romper, a series of swimsuits, and a clutch shaped like a surfboard. Speaking of surfboards, Hilfiger teamed with the Art Production Fund and commissioned artists Lola Schnabel, Richard Phillips (above), Raymond Pettibon, Scott Campbell, and Gary Simmons to design limited-edition boards, all of which will hit stores alongside the capsule. Perhaps considering those who are more inclined to soak up rays than ride waves, Hilfiger also collaborated with CocoCozy on some graphic pillows. Where else would style-conscious beachgoers rest their bronzed heads?

Acne On The Body

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Since launching Acne Paper in 2004, the magazine’s editor in chief and creative director, Thomas Persson, has done far more than simply prove it’s not merely a glossy offset of the denim empire. This week, he’s in New York to fête the launch of the latest issue, number 13. And it’s a very fitting location for celebration—Acne is set to open its first flagship store and office (at 33 Greene Street) outside of Europe in Manhattan later this spring.

As for the latest 256-page edition, the theme is the human body. “We were interested in looking at the body from an artistic angle, one that is broader than the general representation of the human form in magazines today,” Persson tells Style.com. “I find that we are so obsessed with modern, rather boring beauty ideals, the perfectly chiseled, impersonal bodies often lacking in humanity, history, and a life lived. So we wanted to look at the human form as an inspiration beyond that.”

That vision carried over in interviews with the likes of Isabella Rossellini, Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn (pictured, above), Lillian Bassman, and Lola Schnabel, and rich photo essays to go with them. Here, Style.com has the exclusive first look at a few of the editorials, including Fonssagrives-Penn’s (with photos by her husband, Irving, selected by their son, Tom Penn) and Bassman’s—both are women that drew Persson’s attention for their glamour and sophistication.

“I have always admired Lillian Bassman’s work and had the great privilege of spending an afternoon with her last September,” Persson says of the late fashion photographer, who died just last month. “I was so taken by her wit and strength and character and was so sad when I got the news she had passed away. Our interview must have been the last she ever gave.” As for Fonssagrives-Penn, he says, “I wanted to show an amazing side of her that is not so well-known, which is that of an artist. She was an incredibly gifted sculptor and painter; her work is my favorite of any artist.”

Photos: Irving Penn; Lillian Bassman

 

You May Be Ready For These Jellies

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“This is the only way to have a party,” Erin Wasson announced last night, looking breezy in cream linen overalls at Milk Studios’ penthouse patio on the Hudson. Behind her, the sky had turned tangerine and yachts slid by on the purple water while Leigh Lezark and the MisShapes manned the DJ booth. “What better way to spend the evening than watching the sunset with a cocktail?”

Guests like Dree Hemingway, Cory Kennedy, Brian Wolk and Claude Morais of Ruffian, Carly Cushnie, and Michelle Ochs seemed to agree. Their host, the Brazilian plastic-sandal maker Melissa, was celebrating its new collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier, who designed a rubbery stiletto, but he’s only the latest of many. A retrospective of 30 years of collaborative jelly footwear from guest designers past and present lined a few display vitrines. (Beyoncé, if you ever condescend to wear flats, you may like Thierry Mugler’s gold, genie-ish slip-on from the early eighties.) Nearby, a film by Lola Schnabel played against a studio scrim, and a piece by tattooer-turned-art-star Scott Campbell—a sheet of dollar bills, perforated by a heart—hung on a wall. It fluttered in the river breeze and Campbell, too, admired the view. “Every party should be like this,” he said. “They’ve spoiled us.”

Inside was the art, but outside was the action, where revelers sipped Champagne and cachaça cocktails. (The bravest accepted shots from circulating waiters.) Co-host Lorenzo Martone (with Hemingway, left), another successful Brazilian export, surveyed the crowd. “I guess I have really good friends,” he said. “It just makes sense to me—they are a summer brand and they haven’t had a party. I said, we need to have a party.” Irrefutable logic.

Photo: Billy Farrell/PatrickMcMullan.com