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August 27 2014

styledotcom 12 looks styled for your weekend getaway: stylem.ag/1AUSqbx #LaborDay pic.twitter.com/BWaZlnsSFq

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6 posts tagged "Lori Goldstein"

Ten Looks, One Show: The Industry’s Top Stylists Honor the Albright Fashion Library

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FIT x MAC Fashion Library

It’s been over ten years since Irene Albright first opened the doors to the Albright Fashion Library—the more than 15,000-dress-, 7,000 shoe-strong collection of contemporary couture, ready-to-wear, and accessories now housed in a massive 7,000-square-foot loft at 62 Cooper Square. “Irene was working with KCD and saw that people were running around chasing clothes, and she just decided to start buying [important pieces],” recalled the Library’s creative director, Patricia Black. “Eventually, people would come to her saying, ‘Oh, do you still have that sweater? Can I borrow it?’”

Today, after a decade functioning as a sort of dream closet for fashion insiders, the Library is feting its history, as well as the incredible individuals who have pulled from its continually evolving archive, with Albright Goes to School, an exhibition in partnership with the Fashion Institute of Technology and MAC Cosmetics that opens this evening at the Museum at FIT.

“I wanted to celebrate Irene, the Library, the stylists—the people who were working on the inside—the shakers and tastemakers,” said Black. “Without them, we wouldn’t have what we have in terms of this colossal space just packed from floor to ceiling with clothes.”

FIT

The show—a first look debuts here—features individual looks that ten stylists (June Ambrose, Paul Cavaco, Catherine George, Tom Broecker, Freddie Leiba, Lori Goldstein, Kathryn Neale, Mary Alice Stephenson, Kate Young, and Patti Wilson) created using iconic wares from the Library. A Tom Ford goat hair jacket layers over a Comme des Garçons tank in Goldstien’s look; Balmain is mixed with Givenchy and the artist’s own choker and face mask in Leiba’s; and Patti Wilson utilizes a Lanvin body harness to sex up an otherwise high glamour Yves Saint Laurent and J.W. Anderson combo.

There’s a rich history to the institution, and Black, Museum at FIT director and chief curator Valerie Steele, and set designer Stefan Beckman were tasked with expressing that through a tight narrative. “There are some incredible stylists who pulled these outfits, but they each have their own different story,” related Beckman, who described the installation as a “gritty fire escape urban idea.”

Steele added that the Museum’s interest in the exhibition stemmed, in part, from a desire to champion stylists. “People tend to think, Oh, designers make fashion. So it was important to be able to bring in stylists and show that they also have a really important role in putting looks together.”

The ten ensembles will be on display through March 31. The show marks the beginning of a greater collaboration between FIT and the Albright Fashion Library. “Irene is such an eclectic collector of everything from fashion to art to houses to people. So who knows what she’s going to start collecting next and where we’re going to take that,” suggested Black. “[But] I’m excited about the beginnings of seeing how we get to work and inspire the new generation of kids who dream of becoming the next designer, visual director, creative director, fashion editor, stylist, or costume designer. I’m hoping that we can lend a little bit of light to them in this moment.”

Photo:  
Photos: George Chinsee  

Thirty-Five Years Later, Lori Goldstein Is Still Excited

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Lori Goldstein

If you’ve picked up an issue of W, Vogue Italia, or Vanity Fair in the last thirty-five years, you’ve probably seen the work of Lori Goldstein. Famed for her expertly piled-on, more-is-more aesthetic (with the exception of that iconic Demi Moore cover, on which the actress appeared nude, pregnant, and accessorized only with diamonds), Goldstein has collaborated with all the greats—from Donatella Versace to Annie Leibovitz to Mario Testino. On November 1, the New York-based stylist (along with Harpers Design) will release Style Is Instinct, a retrospective tome comprising her most memorable photographs, with a heartfelt introduction from close friend Steven Meisel. “It’s kind of the crescendo of my styling career,” offered Goldstein, who currently serves as the editor at large at Elle and designs her own line for QVC. While sitting in her closet, which Goldstein told us is filled with “every Proenza tie-dye shirt, Dries Van Noten’s entire Fall collection, and plenty of print and embellishment,” the image-maker talks the art of styling, how the industry has changed, and why, “after 400 years” in the biz, she’s still excited.

In Steven Meisel’s introduction to the book, he calls you an artist. Do you feel that styling is an art?
You know, if you had asked me that ten years ago, I probably would have laughed. I do, and honestly, not to use that term loosely, but I think that I’ve learned that when you follow your heart and you do something that you love and you’re creative, that you have an artist’s mind, and that your lifestyle is very different. I think tapping into that for all of us is so important. So today, I have to say, yes.

"Style Is Instinct" by Lori GoldsteinThe title of the book is Style Is Instinct. When did you first realize that you had the instinct for style? When I was born. That’s been my gift through life. I’ve just always loved beautiful things; I was always attracted to putting things together; I always loved playing with clothes; I loved, loved, loved clothes. I didn’t even call it “fashion,” because that’s a whole other thing. I was drawn to sparkly, gorgeous things. I was born in Ohio, and somehow I just saw the beauty in it all, thank God.

How do you feel that the role of the stylist has changed throughout the course of your career?
That’s one of the reasons I wanted to do the book. We all know how it’s changed—it’s become much more of a business. When I started going to shows, it was like Helmut Lang and Ann Demeulemeester, and this really organic, just awesome creative time; I was so lucky. I worked at Allure. We did Vogue Italia. And there was really no such thing as credits. We just did whatever we wanted, which was amazing. But I love the time now because I also love a challenge. Today there are parameters and there are rules, but within that, you’ve got to make something incredible. Continue Reading “Thirty-Five Years Later, Lori Goldstein Is Still Excited” »

Has Nicolas Ghesquière Surfaced?

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“Where’s Nicolas going?” has been the parlor game of choice for the fashion set of late, and as of this week, there may be at least part of an answer: onto Twitter. The new @TWNGhesquiere hasn’t breathed a (digital) word yet, but W‘s Edward Enninful posted a welcome message, which is probably about as close to an authentication as you can get without Twitter’s little blue check. Is it really him? The account is following a more-or-less Ghesquière-approved 11 people (including Enninful, Lori Goldstein, Charlotte Rampling, Pierre Hardy, and much of the staff of French Elle), but further than that, there’s no saying for sure, until (at earliest) his first transmission. The world awaits.

Photo: Twitter.com

Best In Class

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With the school year around the corner, budding young fashion designers and journalists—the scholars of the 75th edition of the YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund—wrapped up a summer in the city last night with a panel of headlining speakers: Alexis Bittar (pictured, left), Lori Goldstein (pictured, center), Cynthia Rowley (pictured, right), Michael Bastian, Terron Schaefer, and the affable moderator Mickey Boardman who opened with the line, “I started at Paper 20 years ago. With luck, you’ll make it to the middle, as I have.” Much of the panel’s discussion, titled “The Future of Fashion, Starting Out: What I Wish I Knew Then and Other Insights from Fashion Leaders’ Early Years,” was centered on advice for surviving the industry. With the summer heat, the conversation at FIT flowed loose and unedited. For one, Bastian emphasized putting in the grunt work and warned, “Our industry is littered with these people who think they’re born to be only number-one.” The menswear designer was echoed via confirming nods from his colleagues.

Goldstein, meanwhile, pointed out the various strong personalities in the industry, admitting that she was something of a control freak. That wasn’t necessarily a negative, though; as it turned out, direction and execution apparently produced results. The award-winning Schaefer also professed to hold the reins close. “I’m often wrong but never in doubt,” Schaefer said.

And for those looking for a shortcut (a.k.a. the next young YSL), better to look elsewhere. It seemed there was more than one path to fashion stardom but the road was at best murky. “My first job, I was a bartender,” Rowley said. “I was a total dropout,” Bittar, who began hawking antique jewelry on St. Marks Place while still in elementary school, added. But for overcoming roadblocks and to pursue success, Bittar recommended, “Be really honest with yourself about what you want to be. What are your ethics? Your aspirations? And if you don’t love it, then get out.”

Photo: Laila Bahman / KSW

OpenSky’s The Limit

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“Up until six months ago, I thought OpenSky was an airline,” CFDA CEO Steven Kolb admits. For those in the same boat, OpenSky.com is actually a new e-commerce site that offers members (sign-up is free and open to anyone) access to a virtual cabinet of celebrity and expert curators. Members to the site choose the experts—spanning fields from fashion to design to food to fitness and including Julianne Moore, Carolyn Murphy, Lori Goldstein, and more—that most appeal to them, and can then shop items said experts curate for the site. Starting tomorrow, you can count the CFDA among them. As part of a new initiative, OpenSky members will be able to buy exclusive accessories from CFDA members including Diane von Furstenberg, House of Waris’ Waris Ahluwalia, Albertus Swanepoel, Selima Optique, and Fallon’s Dana Lorenz.

“We wanted to start with accessories since American accessories are the best and they never get the spotlight they deserve,” Kolb explains. “But ultimately it is the CFDA’s dream to sell something from all 400 CFDA designers.” Until then, designers like Swanepoel, a milliner, are enjoying their moment in the spotlight. “It is amazing exposure for my small brand,” he says. “I do not currently have e-retailers on board, so this is a first for me.” Here, in this Style.com exclusive video (above), Swanepoel talks about the four exclusive hats he made for the program.