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August 20 2014

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219 posts tagged "Louis Vuitton"

Everything You Need to Know About Fall ’14′s Hautest Jewelry

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In the run-up to September’s Biennale des Antiquaires—arguably the most important event on the jewelry calendar—there is much muchness being showcased in and around the Place Vendôme. But while big may be beautiful and jaw-dropping, some of the season’s most compelling pieces, such as “floating” stones and unexpected 3-D effects, prove that less can still be more. Below, we tell you everything you need to know about the hautest of this season’s fine jewelry.

A Fine JewelA Fine Jewel: A champion of couture with parsimony, Emmanuel Aubry decided to “turn water to ice” by mounting a 47-carat rectangular cabochon atop a mirror in a white-gold cage setting called the Riva, in homage to the boat. By the time you read this, the one-of-a-kind Riva will have likely vaporized. (It happens to be the least bank-breaking bauble of the week.) Fortunately, Aubry has other aquas to freeze and plenty of other stones where “things are happening.”

BoucheronBoucheron: Japan, Russia, India, China, and Persia offered up a whirlwind world tour of inspirations, among them a Bolshoi-informed diamond necklace that can become a tiara: the Trésor de Perse necklace in diamonds, rock crystal, and two cabochon sapphires including one that once belonged to the shah of Iran and a 190-carat engraved emerald that belonged to a 17th-century maharajah. “It’s all about the majesty of the stones,” commented creative director Claire Choisne. “There’s no need for complexity. I try to stay as invisible as possible and keep it simple.”

BuccellatiBuccellati: Every two years, Buccellati focuses on a single object. This year, it’s Bracelets de Rêves. Forty unique variations on house signatures by Andrea Buccellati feature baroque flourishes set into a silky, textured background known as rigato, a proprietary technique, or gold honeycomb lace. The dazzling diamond-, sapphire-, and tsavorite-encrusted cuff was two years in the making. The house is also quietly turning out unexpected pieces, such as gold and diamond iPad and phone covers.

BulgariBulgari: Stones talk. Lucia Silvestri has spent her life listening to them for Bulgari, but even she can’t quite explain how she does it. That’s why she decided to whittle 4 carats off her favorite stone in the collection: a Burmese sapphire. The 58-carat cabochon anchors one of the nine creations in the Musa collection. Overall, candy-colored stones with irregular shapes and bezel settings take pride of place. (Silvestri affectionately calls one necklace “The Flintstone.”) High-jewelry serpentis mark the house’s 130th anniversary.

ChanelChanel: In a departure, Chanel tapped into the explosive creative freedom of café society and shook loose of strictly figurative codes. What camellias and stars remained got the abstract treatment, as graphic relief on the supple, 3-D Sunset necklace heavy with padparadscha sapphires and diamonds. Elsewhere, the house ventured into gold with red enamel on an openwork bracelet set with diamonds and yellow sapphires. Another showstopper: the Broadway bracelet set with 35 carats’ worth of baguette, brilliant, and square-cut diamonds.

Cindy ChaoCindy Chao: Cindy Chao dances on the line between jewelry and art objects. This year’s centerpiece was the much-talked about 10th anniversary Ballerina Butterfly, a collaboration with Sarah Jessica Parker that will be auctioned to benefit the New York City Ballet in October. Elsewhere, the designer continued her tribute to nature and the four seasons, which most recently included sculptural orchid earrings wrought in 3-D with large sapphires and diamonds on all sides of the piece.

DauphinDauphin: Charlotte de La Rochefoucauld is exploring a “blue period” with her nascent jewelry line. Her latest pieces include a boule ring based on her minimalist cuff, which are both done in black diamonds on palladium gold with a midnight blue cast that changes depending on the light. The cuff is also offered in black, gray, and white ombré diamonds and, come September, in rose gold, a special edition for Le Bon Marché. The designer has also spun out her Eiffel-esque design into a significant diamond-set signet ring.

DiorDior: Of the twenty-one one-of-a-kind pieces in Victoire de Castellane’s ArchiDior high-jewelry collection, all but four had been snapped up by the middle of Couture week. Among the pieces inspired by Christian Dior’s creations from 1947 to early 1950 were the surprising Corolle Soir in pigeon’s blood rubies and diamonds, and the Envol ring, which echoes the dress by reprising a button detail with a significant emerald. There was also a hint of what’s to come in the other twenty-three pieces now being readied for the Biennale, with Plissée Verticale, a ribbon of diamonds ending in pear-cut emeralds.

Louis VuittonLouis Vuitton: Acte V signals the house’s fifth high-jewelry collection, and that key numeral-slash-letter is the springboard for pieces based on Gaston-Louis Vuitton’s tricolor monogram, sketchbooks, and 1925 Milano vanity set. A necklace with a nearly 88-carat Australian black opal was the headline act. But the talking points for many editors were smaller entries, such as the Deco-informed Apotheosis cuff and the hexagonal ring boasting diamonds, chrysoprase, and a hint of the seventies.

Repossi Repossi: We’re hearing a lot about “floating” stones this season, but no one did it quite like Gaia Repossi. “Just the stone is enough,” the designer noted of the delicately futuristic collection she called “set on empty.” One major statement was the ring with four yellow diamonds and one white in various shapes and sizes. “It’s big, but it’s camouflage big,” the designer offered. Also big and less camouflage-able were two Bauhaus-inspired cuffs in pink gold “tulle” and diamonds.

RezaReza: Olivier Reza doesn’t “do” themes. Fair enough: He has more stones than anyone. For the first time in fifteen years, Reza will show at the Biennale with a mix of about forty new pieces as well as some archival favorites, such as a pair of significant seventies-era drop earrings with two sapphires that together weigh 100 carats (that’s not counting the diamonds, plus they’re not for sale). Among the new wares are the Tremblant ruby and diamond earrings, and contemporary takes on the “toi et moi” with two stones set at close remove.

WilfredoWilfredo Rosado:As an assistant to Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat back in the eighties, Wilfredo Rosado discovered a passion for art that has followed him everywhere since. For this softer, lighter-colored collection, the designer looked to the work of Cy Twombly, notably his Alhambra period, for gems layered in the spirit of Moroccan mosaics. Two other groups, Bakkheia and Rapture, render the artist’s zigzags and scribbles in great swoops of white and colored diamonds.

VenyxVenyx: Natural phenomena, stars, and green lights fascinate Eugenie Niarchos. With her second collection, Theiya—a name that nods to the Greek goddess of sight, light, and shiny things in general—the designer offered another take on nature’s beauty in lightning bolt bracelets, Venyx stars (one branch is longer than the others), and a constellation of diamonds on an ear cuff called Lady Australis. Twin dusk and dawn pendants called Theiya Lumia were set with diamonds and moonstone or labradorite and a tiny piece of the Gibeon meteorite in back.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

Resort ’15: Our Top 20 Accessories

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071014_Now_Trending_Resort_Accessories_blog-sbAnyone who’s been through the Resort ringer or brushing up on our trend reports recognizes the season’s commercial significance. Pre-Spring is time to shine when it comes to sales, and we witnessed savvy brands amping up their accessories offerings this year—because at the end of the day, most customers would still rather invest in a timeless bag or a terrific pair of shoes than blow their budget on a fancy cocktail dress they’ll only break out occasionally. This summer, the editors here at Style.com have all but sworn off our heels in favor of still-trendy sneakers or casual flats, and so we got a kick out of the down-to-earth gladiators (much easier than the towering styles made popular two years ago) from the likes of Miu Miu, Valentino, and Sacai Luck. Similarly, the latest lineups from Alexander Wang and 3.1 Phillip Lim both featured knee-high, lace-up desert boots ideal for stomping on city sidewalks. Elsewhere, Nicolas Ghesquière earned extra credit for his Cruise extras spotted on the Louis Vuitton runway in Monaco. Highlights here included the monogrammed Petite Malle bag, which was updated with a chain-link handle. Among this season’s other fresh accessories propositions were Reed Krakoff’s new RK40 satchel, which was a bona fide hit at his recent presentation; Stella McCartney’s bejeweled wooden clutches; and Gucci’s killer go-go boots. Of course, we couldn’t resist the novelty factor of Giles’ playful stegosaurus purse and Jeremy Scott’s “This Is Not a Moschino T-Shirt” moment.

Click here for a slideshow of twenty of our favorite Resort ’15 accessories.

From Beach To Street, Swimsuits Make the Ready-to-Wear Crossover

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Now TrendingThe lines between swim and ready-to-wear are blurrier than ever these days. This season, we’ve witnessed tastemakers replacing still-happening crop tops with functional yet stylish suits meant to be worn at the beach and off of it. Swapping out your underwear for your bikini isn’t necessarily new—particularly if you’ve ever been a few days behind on laundry—but designers are now emphasizing underpinnings as a key part of the total look. Resort found the likes of Rosetta Getty and Fendi’s Karl Lagerfeld layering triangle tops under silk shirtdresses and mesh vests, while high-waisted briefs turned up at Louis Vuitton, Mary Katrantzou, and Agnona. Sporty bandeaus, meanwhile, proved to be popular among the likes of Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, and Preen.

Here, a slideshow of swimsuits making the ready-to-wear crossover.

EXCLUSIVE: First Look at Louis Vuitton’s Fall Campaign by Annie Leibovitz, Bruce Weber, and Juergen Teller

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Louis Vuitton
Louis Vuitton

Naturally, we expected big things from Nicolas’ Ghesquière’s first Louis Vuitton campaign. And as is so often the case, the designer did not disappoint. Ghesquière enlisted not one, not two, but three iconic photographers—Annie Leibovitz, Bruce Weber, and Juergen Teller (who, if you’ll remember, also lensed Vuitton’s Fall and Resort lookbooks)—to shoot his Fall ’14 ads, which he dubbed “Series 1.” The snaps star Charlotte Gainsbourg (Ghesquière’s longtime muse), Liya Kedebe, Freja Beha Erichsen (the Fall ’14 show opener), and Jean Campbell.

The three photographers were given a brief of “classic beauty meeting creative innovation.” Though each approached the task in his or her own way, the images work together to build a fluid, cohesive story. Debuting exclusively here is a behind-the-scenes film of Gainsbourg’s shoot with Leibovitz, set to the tunes of the model’s own music. The short illustrates not only the essence of the collection, but the wearability of Ghesquiere’s first garments for the house. And who better to showcase Ghesquière’s modern French clothes than a quintessentially French femme like Gainsbourg? Have a look at the chanteuse posing in Vuitton’s Fall ’14 wares, above.

Photos: Annie Leibovitz and Juergen Teller for Louis Vuitton

LVMH’s Paris Museum Set to Open in October

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FRANCE-CULTURE-ART-ARCHITECTURE-LOUIS-VUITTONBernard Arnault has finally announced October 27 as the official opening day for the Foundation Louis Vuitton museum in Paris. The 126,000-square-foot building, designed by architect Frank Gehry, will house the corporate art collection of LVMH, as well as specially commissioned works and temporary exhibitions. Fittingly, the debut show, on display through January, focuses on Gehry’s work for the foundation.

“We have a pretty eclectic mix, but it is true that I am quite involved in the choice,” Arnault told WWD of the art in the new museum. “This is a small payback to the public, and to our employees.” Estimated to cost more than $136 million at current exchange, this building is Arnault’s biggest architectural undertaking since 1999′s christening of the twenty-three-story LVMH Tower in New York.

Gehry’s other LVMH creation, a limited-edition monogram handbag for Vuitton, will also be unveiled this October as part of the label’s “The Icon and the Iconclasts” project, along with creations by Karl Lagerfeld, Cindy Sherman, and more.

Photo: AFP/Getty Images