Style.com

April 20 2014

styledotcom First Karl, now Cannes. Creatives can't get enough of the old west; stylem.ag/1haIZbB

Subscribe to Style Magazine
195 posts tagged "Louis Vuitton"

Façonnable Relaunches for Fall ’14

-------

Facconable

Over the past sixty-plus years, Façonnable has established itself as a brand that captures the essence of the Côte d’Azur lifestyle (think: a round of tennis followed by an afternoon spent sailing off the coast of Monaco). Best known for its classic men’s suits and signature sporty staples, such as polo shirts and chinos, the label is repositioning itself and reviving its womenswear program for Fall ’14 with the help of its new artistic director, Daniel Kearns. Before taking the helm at Façonnable, Kearns served as the design director of menswear for Yves Saint Laurent under Stefano Pilati, and also worked at Louis Vuitton, Alexander McQueen, and John Galliano. With this proven prowess in masculine tailoring, he rose to the challenge of creating his first women’s collection. “This is the first time I have mixed both tailoring and flow. Womenswear needs a more sensitive approach and is another mind-set,” he told Style.com.

Facconable

For his debut ladies’ lineup, Kearns kept the look elegant and understated (for the most part), whipping up sharp tuxedos, slim sheaths, and plush outerwear. His looks feature subtle accents that recall Façonnable’s heritage, such as braided trims and belts (a nod to the brand’s nautical roots). With an eye on the modern customer, he added several pieces that felt a bit more fashion-forward, including novelty bomber jackets and a metallic rose-gold pencil skirt. Another major development here was the reintroduction of eveningwear, which plays an important role in Façonnable’s history. When Jean Goldberg founded the label, in 1950, many actresses sought him out for gowns to wear to the Cannes Film Festival. With that in mind, Kearns showed a handful of beautiful, body-skimming column dresses with capelet details in back—the style in crimson-hued silk was a particular standout. “When you think of the French Riviera, you think of Cannes and women like Romy Schneider and Grace Kelly in Monte Carlo, as well as the photography of Helmut Newton and all the artists who retreated here for inspiration,” he explained. Altogether, Kearns’ impressive first foray into womenswear (in addition to new advertising campaigns, updated branding, and refurbished stores) suggests a bright new future for Façonnable.

Façonnable’s Fall ’14 womenswear lookbook, which was shot at the historic Cap Estel hotel, debuts here, exclusively on Style.com.

Photos: Courtesy of Façonnable

In With The New!

-------

NYE sign off

2013 had it all—designer switch-ups, mega companies investing in exciting young brands, epic runway moments, unforgettable ad campaigns, pop star pandemonium, and entertaining celebrity snippets galore. We’re sad to see you go, 2013, but as we raise our glasses to the year ahead, which will see Nicolas Ghesquière’s debut collection for Louis Vuitton, Jonathan Anderson’s first go at Loewe, Anthony Vaccarello’s capsule for Versus Versace, and beyond, we can’t help but look forward to what’s to come. We’ll be taking tomorrow off to ring in the new, but check back on Thursday morning to catch the first fashion news of 2014.

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo

The Final Countdown: Style File’s Top Stories of 2013

-------

Riccardo and Erykah

The fashion biz has had quite a year. 2013 was jam-packed with major designer shake-ups, groundbreaking ad campaigns, celebrity collaborations, and pop-star performance wardrobes filled with custom-made designer duds. In the final days leading up to 2014, we’re counting down Style File’s most popular twenty stories of the past year. So sit back, relax, and relive 2013′s unforgettable moments. Read our top five stories, below. To see all of our most popular posts from 2013, click here.

5. Diamond Girl: Behind the Scenes of Rihanna’s World Tour Wardrobe
Rihanna had a banner year when it came to fashion, culminating in becoming the face of Balmain’s Spring ’14 campaign. Back in March, the star kicked off her Diamonds world tour, and thanks to her stylist, Mel Ottenberg, her onstage wardrobe, which was comprised of mega-watt looks by Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci, Dior’s Raf Simons, Lanvin’s Alber Elbaz, and her River Island co-designer, Adam Selman, had just as much sparkle as the tour’s title would suggest. Style.com’s Katharine K. Zarrella spoke to Ottenberg about all seven of the singer’s custom costumes and what it takes to dress the pop-culture force that is RiRi.

4. Marc Jacobs Bids Adieu to Louis Vuitton
After sixteen years at the helm of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs stepped down from his post as creative director following his Spring ’14 show for the storied house. Following his epic Spring presentation, whose all-black set incorporated pieces from his most memorable shows (remember the escalator? that carousel? the baroque elevator? they were all there), LVMH announced that Nicolas Ghesquière will be filling his shoes come Fall ’14. Jacobs, in turn, will be taking his eponymous company public and further expanding the MJ empire. As the news of his departure broke, Style.com took a look back at Jacobs’ greatest hits for Vuitton.

3. A.P.C.’s Jean Touitou on His New Collaboration With Kanye West
What a year it has been for Kanye West—a new album, a baby, a fiancée, a cornucopia of Margiela masks…but his most notable contribution to the fashion biz in 2013 was no doubt his collaboration with cult favorite French label A.P.C. The range of sweatshirts, tees, and denim sold out in a matter of hours and caused a veritable frenzy of discussion on the Internet. Style.com’s Matthew Schneier broke the news of the team-up in July and interviewed A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou about working with Yeezy and the “Kingdom of Dopeness.”

2. Roller Girl
In May, L.A.-based jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth enlisted actress Alison Brie—of Mad Men and Community fame—to put on some roller skates and show off her bohemian-luxe wares in a short film. Shot in a roller rink in New Jersey, the flick features a cameo from the designer (who admitted that her skating skills are a little shaky) as well as an original song by electro-pop trio Au Revoir Simone. The video debuted exclusively on Style.com.

And the number-one story of 2013 is…

1. Erykah Badu Fronts Givenchy’s New Campaign
Riccardo Tisci surprised and pleased us all when he chose neo-soul singer Erykah Badu to front his Mert & Marcus-lensed Spring ’14 Givenchy campaign, which debuted exclusively on Style.com. Matthew Schneier spoke to Tisci about the new ads, why Badu is “an icon,” and the presence of women of color in fashion.

Photo: via Riccardo Tisci’s Instagram

Home for the Holidays

-------

Vuitton Bear

Our shopping is just about finished, and cravings for eggnog and gingerbread men are setting in. The holidays are fast approaching, and not unlike this furry fellow (who’s got some enviable travel gear, we might add), our bags are packed and we’re heading home to toast the season with our kin. We’ll be back bright and early on Thursday morning, but should you find yourself jonesing for a dose of sartorial cheer, it’s never too early to start planning your New Year’s look. Happy holidays to all!

Photo: Nicole Wisniak for Egoiste N. 16

World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore

-------

The many different edifices—many designed by Rei Kawakubo—of Dover Street Market New YorkTomorrow, Dover Street Market in New York opens its doors to the public (including that very committed member of the public who has been camped out in a pup tent on the corner, reportedly for days, waiting). The multibrand store, owned by Comme des Garçons, stocks both the full range of Comme des Garçons labels (which are many), and lines that Rei Kawakubo and her team select and buy for the store—with the sphinx-like Kawakubo often doing the buys herself.

The concept of shop-in-shops at multibrand retailers is nothing new, and many department stores have concessions piloted by individual designers and labels. But few give so much freedom to so many as Dover Street Market. (“We don’t go in for brainstorming,” CdG CEO Adrian Joffe put it dryly to Style.com last year) The result is that walking through the seven stories of New York’s Dover Street Market—or riding up in the glass elevator that was commissioned for the space—is a varied, eye-popping, and often surreal experience. Brands are grouped together in unlikely arrangements, decided by Kawakubo. On the seventh floor, Prada sits next to the skate brand Supreme, the Japanese line Visvim, and near André Walker, the cult designer coaxed out of semi-retirement to design a new collection for the store. And because most if not all of the labels are given license to design their own spaces and fixtures, going from one to the next, even over a distance of only a few feet, can feel like traveling between dimensions or falling down the proverbial rabbit hole. (This is not even to take into account the stairway, designed by the architects Arakawa and Gins, which somewhat resembles a birth canal and is reputed, according to a Comme representative, “to reverse your destiny.”) And this is before you account for the artworks commissioned from the space, including three artist-designed pillars that evolve as they cut through the seven floors, a sound art installation, a mural and more.

The result is a store that is completely unlike all of the existing shopping experiences in New York. But for every person disoriented by the experience, there is likely to be another delighted by the creative chaos. “It’s not overthought. I feel sometime shopping environments can be overcalculated—it’s nearly forced, duty-free luxury,” said Jonathan Anderson, who created the first branded space he’s ever done in the history of his J.W. Anderson label for the store. “I don’t think luxury has to be determined in that way. I think luxury is about the arrangement of ideas, not necessarily the finish.”

Style.com spoke with several designers who created their own spaces—and in many cases, exclusive product—for Dover Street Market New York.

Dover Street Market New York opens tomorrow at 160 Lexington Avenue, NYC.

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's space at Dover Street Market New YorkAnderson, the London-based designer who was recently named creative director of Loewe, was inspired to build his space out of children’s foam-rubber play blocks, all in a shade somewhere between sky and Yves Klein blue. He’d seen children playing with them in a park in Venice, where he’d just returned from his first vacation in seven years when Joffe asked him to do a space on DSMNY’s fifth floor. “They’re from America, weirdly,” he said. “The company did them exclusively in different shapes for us. It was quite fun, actually.”

Dover Street has been a longtime patron of Anderson’s collections, which are also stocked in its London and Ginza, Tokyo, stores. Kawakubo herself selects the pieces to carry which often, thanks to her off-kilter eye, end up being exclusive to DSM. “I always like watching her edit. I love her commitment to fashion, buying from other brands. You have to be on a very different plane to able to do that,” he said. “I think that’s what’s so exciting about the relationship between Dover Street and Comme des Garçons. I think it’s such an interesting exercise, and that’s why there’s no compromise in the buy, there’s no compromise in the store shopping experience.”

Supreme

The Supreme space at Dover Street Market New York

“Supreme is a hard brand for people to categorize,” said founder James Jebbia. “DSM does a great job at taking the best brands in the world and mixing them in their store without categorizing them.”

All that is to say, Dover Street let Supreme be Supreme: graphic, in your face and immediate. Jebbia commissioned Weirdo Dave (né Dave Sandey, but also known as Fuck This Life) to create a large backdrop mural of found images, which has a Tumblr-ish spark. (A few yards away hangs Visvim’s cozy hanging quilts.) How much interaction did Kawakubo have with the space? “Not much, really,” Jebbia said. “Rei let us design the space how we wanted, but she looks at and approves every detail. If she didn’t like something, she certainly would have told us.”

Continue Reading “World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore” »