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July 29 2014

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6 posts tagged "Louise Bourgeois"

Broadway’s Fairy Godfather: William Ivey Long

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“I’m in charge of all the magic,” says costume designer William Ivey Long—a veritable Broadway legend—of his latest project. Having been in the biz for over thirty years, Long is in the midst of finishing the costumes (over three hundred of them) for Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella, which, starring Laura Osnes, will go into previews on January 25. His studio—a former strip club in Tribeca—is lined with reference images of Catherine de Médicis (she’s his muse for the wicked stepmother), sketches of the flower-, butterfly-, and vegetable-inspired outfits, and material for his fairy-tale looks, like faux fur, rich green brocade, and silver neoprene-lined leather that will be made into suits of armor. “These can’t be everyday clothes!” he quips.

Of course, little about Long is “everyday.” He’s won five Tony awards, created all the costumes for Broadway’s revival of Chicago—now in it’s eighteenth year—including the saucy Roxie Hart dresses for Brooke Shields, Christie Brinkley, and Robin Givens. He designed the flamboyant space suits for Siegfried and Roy’s Mirage Hotel show, dressed the cast of The Producers, and created the playful fifties ensembles for Hairspray. Modestly styled in a navy blazer and khakis (hailing from North Carolina, he’s a Southern boy at heart), Long sits down with Style.com to talk about working with couturier Charles James, living next door to the late artist Louise Bourgeois, and realizing the fantasy that is Cinderella.

Have you always worked out of this studio?
I used to work out of a brownstone in Chelsea. I moved in here three years ago, on Halloween night. I sold my last house to my next-door neighbor, Louise Bourgeois, for her to turn into her museum. She was fantastic and so supportive. She used to come and see the costumes, and near the end, I had to bring them to her. She would give me assignments and ask me to bring her specific things from my travels. I was so excited when I was able to find ancient tapestries, because her family, the Bourgeois family, for centuries restored and cleaned tapestries. She loved looking at all the fabrics, and she would use them to make various things, her little totems. She loved turning existing clothes that she had worn into her sculptures.

Let’s talk slippers. Did you know that, allegedly, Cinderella’s shoes were supposed to be ermine instead of glass? Some say it was an error in the seventeenth-century transcript.

No! Fur slippers would have been very surreal. And comfy. But guess who’s making my glass slippers? Stuart Weitzman! They’re made out of clear plastic. Apparently, in the seventies, when Weitzman first started, he had glass Cinderella high heels in one of his collections. Well, they were plastic made to look like glass.

How did you come to work with Stuart Weitzman?

It’s a complicated thing with producer connections, etc. Usually I don’t have such exalted playmates. Stuart is so charming. He fit the shoe on Laura Osnes’ foot for the first time the other day, and he was just like the prince. But I’m working with eight shops on the actual costumes. I’m in charge of the “magical” dress transformations, so my shops have to be knowledgeable about the intricacies of this and that. Nobody comes onstage to help the actors. They do it themselves. And it doesn’t black out, there’s no puff of smoke. They really do the magic in front of you.

Continue Reading “Broadway’s Fairy Godfather: William Ivey Long” »

Postcard From Venice: Laure Heriard Dubreuil Reports From The Final Days Of The Biennale

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The Webster co-founder Laure Heriard Dubreuil and her boyfriend, artist Aaron Young, hit Venice this week for the legendary Biennale di Venezia. For those farther than a vaporetto away from the action, she’s sending back updates on the sights and the sounds (and a few parties, too).

We started Friday at the Prada Foundation, which I found to be one of the highlights of the entire Biennale. I totally related to Maurizio Cattelan’s sculpture of an ostrich with its head in the ground (left), but I have to say—clothes being such an important element of my life—my favorite piece was Louise Bourgeois’ cell (clothes) from 1996. Walking around it, you snuck peeks through a pair of glass doors to discover a white blouse with the words “The cold of anxiety is very real” embroidered in red.

After the Foundation, I walked around the little streets with Aaron and went for a gelato. It’s a must in Italy, especially with this beautiful weather. We couldn’t resist any longer. Then onto an antique little shoemaker’s shop behind Piazza San Marco to get a pair of Gondoliers’ velvet shoes. I’d love to wear them totally worn-out in red and navy with summer dresses… (Speaking of summer dresses, there were plenty on display over the course of the festival…and none more popular among festivalgoers than Prada’s and Alaïa’s. I haven’t been anywhere for the past five days without seeing at least four or five beautiful women showing off one or the other’s Spring 2011 collections!)

From there, went to see Julian Schnabel’s show, Permanently Becoming and the Architecture of Seeing at the Museo Correr. The show was closed when we arrived but fortunately Julian arrived at the same time with Cyprien Gaillard (another artist who has a few pieces in Venice, too) and they opened the doors for us. The ballroom was completely dark when we entered, as the shutters were already closed, but Julian opened a window himself and the sunlight brought his piece El Spontaneo (for Abelardo Martinez) (1990) back to life! Continue Reading “Postcard From Venice: Laure Heriard Dubreuil Reports From The Final Days Of The Biennale” »

To Gallery Hop Or To Shop?
At Agnès B., No Need To Choose

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“It’s my relationship with New York that I am trying to show through the art,” Agnès Troublé said Friday night at her new Soho gallery-slash-boutique. “I wanted to give my friends here an homage for the pleasure we have together.”

Those friends include artists and filmmakers Harmony Korine, Ryan McGinness, Dan Colen, and the late Louise Bourgeois. A carefully curated collection of brightly colored paintings and photographs by Troublé’s friends, set to change monthly, now covers the exposed brick walls of her Howard Street store—the 246th one worldwide. Works of art by the likes of José Parlá, Rostarr, and McGinness are also available in the more wearable form of limited-edition T-shirts, sold exclusively at the boutique.

Troublé, a major collector herself, has had a longstanding love affair with both art (“since 1983 in Paris, we have [had] a little gallery in Marseille”) and fashion. On Friday, the Paris-based designer saw the marriage of her two greatest passions. “It’s my life,” she said of art. “We have been doing this in a way for a long time, but not so visible as here. It’s normal̵2finally.”

Photos: Courtesy of Agnes B

First Look: A MAGAZINE Curated By Giambattista Valli

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Some people dream of opening their own boutique. Some people dream about editing their own magazine. Giambattista Valli gets to do both: Valli (left) is the guest editor of issue No. 10 of A MAGAZINE, which will launch in tandem with the opening of his first store, in Paris this November. Following designers such as Yohji Yamamoto, Riccardo Tisci, and Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler onto the Belgian pub’s masthead, Valli has conceived his issue of A MAGAZINE as an extended essay on the topic “What is beauty?” Work by Chiara Clemente, Nan Goldin, Louise Bourgeois, Richard Avedon, and the late Corinne Day will help him answer that question. The print magazine launches in late November, but impatient Valli fans can get a look at the online edition on October 10. To tide them over in the meantime, Valli prepared a special “scrapbook” collage of inspiration images, seen here (below) for the first time.


Photos: Kate Barry (Valli portrait); Courtesy of A MAGAZINE

Where To Stay In Parrot Cay, A Few Of Brian Atwood’s Favorite Things, And More…

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Still waiting on that invite to Donna Karan’s Parrot Cay home? Here’s what you’re missing (pictured)—plus peeks inside the digs of Jenna Lyons, Ralph Rucci, and more American fashion designers. [WWD]

Or maybe you’re looking to get on Brian Atwood’s good side? Give him a Muji pen—or a pair of Naked & Famous jeans, Tom Ford specs, or any other of his ten must-have products. [GQ]

After the weekend’s none-too-favorable New York Times Magazine profile of M.I.A., the singer has posted the “truff”—an audio file of her interview with writer Lynn Hirschberg, plus a new song for good measure. [NEET Recordings]

Lily Cole finished up her end-of-year exams at Cambridge and looked “relieved,” reports British Vogue. Phew! [Vogue U.K.]

And sad news from the weekend: Sculptor and feminist icon Louise Bourgeois passed away on Monday at the age of 98. [NYT]

Photo: Courtesy of Assouline