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April 18 2014

styledotcom But, really, how amazing are these stickers? @COI_NYC instagram.com/p/m8jSivkttV/

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8 posts tagged "Luella Bartley"

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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Marc by Marc Jacobs

RODARTE
Breakfast with my colleague Maya to go over the lineup for the next issue of Style.com/Print, which we put together while simultaneously covering the shows on the site and publish within a month of the close of Paris fashion week, a live-broadcast approach to making a magazine. Then it was off to the Rodarte show. Last season’s collection got slated, though I sort of liked its trashy energy. This one had more of the Mulleavy sisters’ customary handcrafted offbeat charm and should be a hit with their fans. After that it was on to Diesel Black Gold on the West Side, and then a meeting on the East Side with a European luxury house, who filled me in on its plans for a huge event later this spring.

MBMJ
Tons of energy and lots of food for thought at Marc by Marc Jacobs, which has been rechristened by its initials and is now in the hands of the London-based duo of Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier. Something about the scale of the plywood set and the refracted references here made me think I could have been at a show in Paris. There was an intriguing magpie quality to the clothes, as if you were moving through the racks of Dover Street Market from the Japanese designer section to the sophisticated European section to the streetwear section. My favorite grouping was the BMX-inspired looks. The show was a bona fide smash with the audience. It’ll be interesting to see how the aesthetic, a break from the line’s more insouciant past, plays at retail. Delphine Arnault, of the parent group LVMH, was looking on from the front row.

ANDRE WALKER
Talking of Dover Street Market, I ran into the new Comme des Garçons-operated, multiretailer space on Lexington Avenue to say hello to Andre Walker. Walker is the first to describe himself as an “elusive” designer, and after a few stops and starts, he’s back with a small line, thanks to the encouragement of DSM’s Adrian Joffe and Rei Kawakubo. You’ll find it on the seventh floor between Junya Watanabe and Prada, an indication of the esteem Kawakubo has for Walker.

NARCISO RODRIGUEZ
Every season, there are a couple of models who break through and start popping up in all the big shows so that you can trace the day’s development through their changing hairstyles and runway attitudes. This season, those models are Binx Walton and Anna Ewers, who in the space of a few hours went from Bolshevik ninja at MBMJ to sleek gallerina at the serenely beautiful Narciso Rodriguez show that closed another day of New York fashion week.

Photo: Getty ImagesĀ 

Marc Jacobs’ Name Changer

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marc jacobsThis morning, Marc Jacobs announced that he is changing the name of his popular diffusion line, Marc by Marc Jacobs. “I’ve always hated that name,” Jacobs told British Vogue. Of course, the new name has yet to be unveiled; Jacobs is “superstitious” and apparently wants to wait for the right time. Might that be on February 11 at Katie Hillier and Luella Bartley’s first Marc by Marc Jacobs show? We wouldn’t be surprised. The news coincides with Jacobs’ recent departure from Louis Vuitton to focus on his main line as well as the company’s forthcoming IPO.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Marc By Marc Taps Luella Bartley And Katie Hillier

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Luella BartleyLuella Bartley (left) has been missed since she shuttered her whimsical namesake label back in 2009 due to recession woes, so for us fashion folk, news of her comeback has stirred up a healthy dose of excitement. Today, WWD announced that Bartley and fellow Brit designer Katie Hillier have been appointed as the new design director and creative director, respectively, of Marc by Marc Jacobs‘ womenswear range. This marks the first time in the line’s fifteen-year-history that anyone other than Jacobs has been in the spotlight for a design role in the women’s collection. Hillier, who, according to reports, was tapped first and then brought Bartley on board, has worked with Marc by Marc on a freelance basis for the last ten years. Jacobs will continue to oversee the overall creative direction of the range, and the pair’s efforts will first be seen in the Fall 2014 collection.

Photo: Marcio Madeira

Luella’s Tough Break, Jesus’ Family, And More…

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Recession scorecard: girly Brit department. Luella Bartley announced today that Luella has stopped trading after its global licensee withdrew its investments in the label. Even more heartbreaking? Spring 2010 orders will not be filled. [Vogue U.K.]

Before Tom Ford designed Tom Ford, he designed for Yves Saint Laurent. And he hated it. [Page Six]

Alicia Keys is hiding messages in her new (and first) line of jewelry, created in collaboration with Gisèle Theriault. The affirmations are courtesy of Dr. Masaru Emoto, the controversial Japanese author of The Hidden Messages in Water. How positively metaphysical. [WWD]

Madonna is not meeting Jesus’ parents on her upcoming trip to Brazil. Yeah, that was a really great sentence to write. [Page Six]

The 25th anniversary of the British Fashion Awards is upon us, and the British Fashion Council has created a new award for “an individual who embodies the spirit of London and who is an ambassador for the capital’s fashion industry.” Yes, fashion really is like high school. [Telegraph U.K.]

Gemma Ward has no plans to return to modeling anytime soon. So stop picking on her! [News Au]

Photo: Marcio Madeira

Linda Farrow Goes Behind The Archives. Way Beyond.

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Nirvana, for sunglasses fanatics, is to be found in a converted schoolhouse in the Clerkenwell area of London. That’s where the Linda Farrow archives are housed—a few filing cabinets’ worth of specs dating from the origins of the Linda Farrow brand in the late 1960′s. Aviators of all shapes and sizes and superbly wacky ’80′s frames in iridescent metal and candy-colored plastic number among the styles that Simon Jablon found in his mother’s warehouse several years ago. The trove inspired him to launch the Linda Farrow Vintage brand in 2003. Initially, Jablon and partner Tracy Sedino were selling off the archive; these days, they’re working to augment it. The brand is already a profligate collaborator, working with Raf Simons, Luella Bartley, Veronique Branquinho, and Jeremy Scott, to name a few, and with the launch of the new Projects range this summer, Linda Farrow Vintage will
be bringing yet more designers into its fold. “We’ve always loved working with young, creative designers,” explains Jablon, “because every time we do, we learn something. They’re constantly bringing us ideas that seem impossible to execute.” Projects comprise styles from designers such as Giles, Tim Hamilton, Antonio Berardi, Charles Anastase, and Preen. As Jablon notes, additional designers may be added to the Projects roster in seasons to come. And in the meantime, he and Sedino have combined the very new and the very, very, very, very old in the latest Linda Farrow Vintage frame—the Mammoth. This limited-edition addition to the archive features—seriously—woolly mammoth tusk. “We’re only doing 100 pieces,” says Jablon. “The melting of the polar ice caps has exposed quite a lot of mammoth tusk, enough that a bit of it has found its way to market, but the bottom line,” he adds, “is that you can only produce so many sunglasses that are over a million years old.”

Photo: Courtesy of Linda Farrow