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August 27 2014

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2 posts tagged "Luke Brooks"

London’s Luke Brooks and Beth Postle Fuse T-Shirts, Art, and Sincerity

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Trees and FacesIf you are in London this week, I highly recommend—nay, insist—that you stop by Trees & Faces, a pop-up shop launched by up-and-coming designers Luke Brooks and Beth Postle. The store, whose countertops are comprised of Brooks’ artist father’s paint-encrusted tables (his works are on display, too), is set in East London at 99 Morning Lane, and is open through Sunday, July 20. On offer are one-of-a-kind T-shirts hand-painted with Brooks’ trees (he’s lovingly dubbed those “tree shirts”) and Postle’s abstract, freestyle faces. Also for sale are a range of Brooks’ foam “G-O-D-” and flower fascinators, as well as Postle’s leather goods, made in collaboration with Hannah Cope.

Brooks, if you’ll remember, made quite a stir with his Central Saint Martins MA collection back in 2012, when he, along with Craig Green, won the coveted L’Oréal Professionnel award. Since, the designer has built upon his cerebral, largely handmade approach to design. He has presented at London fashion week, been featured in such magazines as Dazed & Confused and Love, and even crafted looks for Lady Gaga. Postle, meanwhile, is the little sister of Brooks’ friend Jenny Postle, another CSM grad who is one half of vibrant knitwear label Leutton Postle. Beth, too, is in the CSM crew, and will complete her MA this fall.

“Aside from immediate visual aspects that cross over slightly, like painterly-ness, I think [Beth and I] work well together for a few reasons,” Brooks told Style.com. “First, we both care about injecting a degree of humor into our work. But equally important is the fact that it’s sincere work, not ironic or glib. The craft of making is very, very important to both of us. And the things we make look like they were made by a person, with feeling.”

Indeed, the shirts have an emotive, genuine quality to them. And the vibrancy of each DIY product reflects the designers’ untainted passion and enthusiasm. “We bounce ideas off each other very well,” said Postle. “We both get excited and love the work we do, which is quite rare.”

While the one-off T-shirts boast a definitive artistic quality, the price points are (thankfully) significantly less lofty than those you’d find in a gallery. Accessories start at £20, while clothes range from £60 to £120. “We wanted to keep the prices as low as we possibly could because the impetus behind this project is an urge to see people wearing and enjoying our things now, in the summer, having fun,” said Brooks. “It is very much in that spirit—an easy spirit.”

Faces & Trees is located at 99 Morning Lane, London, E9 6ND. The pop-up will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Sunday, July 20.

Photo: Courtesy of Luke Brooks and Beth Postle

The Next Big Thing: Luke Brooks, Spring ’14

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Everyone knows their Marcs from their Calvins. But as fashion month kicks into gear, we’ll be spotlighting the up-and-coming designers and indie brands whose names you’ll want to remember.

Luke Brooks

Label: Luke Brooks

Need to Know: Twenty-seven-year-old West Londoner Luke Brooks knows a thing or two about the danse macabre. After all, it was his stellar Central Saint Martins master’s graduate collection—a chewed-up and spit-out Candy Land dump yard of sorts, complete with eviscerated T-shirt dresses and an inherent call to warning, re: society’s abuse of consumerism—that won him the school’s top accolade for the Class of 2012. And for his first capsule collection outside of CSM, Brooks continued to plumb a deathly vein, jetting west to New England to render gravestone etchings on industrial-grade Tyvek (“They use the material a lot in hospitals,” he mentioned). On display in the British Fashion Council’s Ones to Watch installation at Somerset House, Brooks’ shapeless dresses featured rubbings off of tombstones from as far back as the 1800s and were all lifted from cemeteries in Maine. As for his decision to cross the Atlantic when England boasts plenty of perfectly stocked graveyards, Brooks said, “The icons,” pointing to an angel in particular, “you don’t see those here.”

He Says: “The etchings are just Crayola. We went to Walmart and went around nicking all the black crayons and putting them in one box.”

Where to Find It: Private orders only at this time.

Photos: Courtesy of Luke Brooks