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July 26 2014

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19 posts tagged "Mad Men"

Happy Friday, Here’s A Prada Video

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Prada’s Spring collections exist, which is reason enough—when you’re Prada, at least—to commission Rem Koolhaas’ AMO to make this video, Prada Real Fantasies. (Video Fashion Week envy, perhaps?) I may be especially susceptible to its charms, as I’ve been having a real fantasy about those jogging pants. The beginning gives me shades of the Mad Men title sequence, but that part may be just me.

Helen Gurley Brown, Magazine Innovator, Dead At 90

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Helen Gurley Brown, who edited Cosmopolitan magazine for three decades beginning in the sixties, died this morning. Gurley Brown was famous for her tenure at Cosmo, and it was there that she changed the face of magazines with candor and frankness, especially where sex was concerned; according to the media columnist Jeff Bercovici, “Every time you go past a newsstand, you’re looking at her work.” But magazine editing was her second or even third act. She also penned the historic (and at the time, scandalous) guidebook Sex and the Single Girl in 1962, and before that, rose from the secretarial ranks to become a hugely successful female copywriter at the ad agency Foote, Cone & Belding. (Shades of Mad Men‘s Peggy Olson.) Still, it’s her influence on the magazine industry that earned her the most lasting praise. It was the subject of the 2009 biography Bad Girls Go Everywhere, and as recently as this month, fodder for The New York Times‘ exploration “How Cosmo Conquered the World,” as “the patron saint of Cosmopolitan‘s sex-centric brand of female empowerment.”

Photo: Bettman / Corbis

The Revolution Will Be…Blue?

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“It’s a blue revolution!” exclaimed Lydia Fenet of Christie’s while walking the indigo carpet in an aqua-hued Rachel Roy frock at last night’s screening of La Revolution Bleue—sponsored, thematically enough, by La Mer and Oceana. The documentary, which chronicles the French artist Yves Klein’s work and creation of the painting FC 1 (Fire-Color 1), lured Dr. Lisa Airan, Anh Duong, and Susan Rockefeller to the Paris Theatre, all eager to see the story behind the controversial piece, which involved nude models and gas burners. (On May 8, the oeuvre will be listed at Christie’s Post War & Contemporary Evening Sale, where it’s expected to fetch over $30 million dollars—a record for the monochromatic master.)

“As an artist, to have your name forever associated with a color is very powerful,” Duong told Style.com. “Like Schiaparelli pink, it’s as if Klein invented blue.” Before the screening, host January Jones (in Mary Katrantzou, with a hint of blue eyeliner) talked nursing and baby clothes. “I don’t know if it’s because he’s a boy but Xander responds to blue really well,” she said of her newborn son. The new mom has been painting the town, er, blue, hitting an array of parties in the Big Apple this week. As for her proclivity toward fine art? “I’d love to be a collector, but it’s an extravagant thing,” the Mad Men actress mused. “Fashion is more affordable.” Her wardrobe essentials? “Jeans and a good white men’s shirt.”

Photo: Clint Spaulding / PatrickMcMullan.com

What Is It About The Sixties That Keeps Us Coming Back?

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The early sixties were a favorite reference point on the Fall runways, and as Fashionista recently pointed out, that’s led to an abundance of mod-themed editorials in the new September magazines. It’s worth adding that our culture’s current fascination with the youthquake years goes way beyond fashion. There’s Mad Men, of course, which is finally, officially beginning to produce its fifth season, but next month sees the release of two more decade-specific shows: Pan Am, starring Christina Ricci as a jet-age stewardess, and The Playboy Club, featuring twenty-first-century pinup Amber Heard as a Bunny at the original Chicago club. (Talk about male wish fulfillment!) Then there’s the big screen—and no, we’re not talking about the rumored fourth Austin Powers film. We’ll Take Manhattan is scheduled to come out next year and tells the tale of photographer David Bailey and model Jean Shrimpton’s era-defining fling. We know just the thing to wear to the premiere: a black and white fur coat from Christopher Bailey’s Shrimpton-inspired Burberry Prorsum collection.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW, and let us know what you think about the latest revival.

Photo: Marcus Tondo / GoRunway.com

With Costume Jewels, Faux Is Fab

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“It’s not cheap,” Decades proprietor Cameron Silver said at the Crosby Hotel. “That’s the amazing thing about costume jewelry. I rejected it for years at first because I thought, ‘Who wants to spend $2,000 on a glass necklace?’ It requires education. It’s the design, the final product, that is incredibly valuable.” The retailer (and soon-to-be Bravo reality TV star) has since swung to the other side, so much so that Silver was even talking men’s costume pieces. But he was in like-minded company last night: Silver joined fellow panelists Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant, Candy Pratts Price, and Miriam Haskell president Gabrielle Fialkoff in a CFDA-sponsored discussion on the heritage and business of costume jewelry.

Moderated by Town & Country accessories director Stellene Volandes, the conversation steered from a beginner’s history lesson (Coco Chanel and Miriam Haskell were chummy costume jewelry colleagues) to the modern-day obsession with celebrity (Michelle Obama created an online ordering frenzy for the Miriam Haskell chandelier earrings she wore to the State Dinner this past March). Bryant, for one, was well accustomed to celebrities and the role costume jewelry can play. “For Joan, she has this pen necklace and I think of it as her sword,” the costume designer said of the character the actress Christina Hendricks plays in Mad Men. “It’s funny because Christina never wants to part with it. The actress can become attached to the jewelry, too.”

A tip for the AMC show’s many fashion followers: Bryant found the signature piece in an unlikely “dirty little tin of jewelry at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.” And despite delays and some nail-biting negotiations, it looks like there were will be plenty of episodes with vintage finds ahead. “I was never worried,” Bryant told Style.com post-discussion, about the show being renewed for Season 5. “I had faith.”

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com