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August 27 2014

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104 posts tagged "Madonna"

The Revolution Will Be Madonna-ized

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Madonna in costume at her 55th birthday party

She’ll always be the Material Girl, but this weekend, Madonna turned 55, celebrating with a lavish bash in Nice attended by the likes of Riccardo Tisci, model Jon Kortajarena, and photographers Mert & Marcus. The theme, according to neon on the venue’s façade was REVOLUTION; Madonna herself, a bewigged Marie Antoinette doppelganger. A good time seems to have been had by all, judging from the number of “#hungover” Instagrams that flooded the iPhones of the world the next morning, but a nagging thought occurs: Does Madonna not remember how the revolution ended for Marie Antoinette? It’s all fun and games until someone loses a head.

Photo: @Madonna

A Very JPG Wedding

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Beth Ditto's Wedding

Beth Ditto simultaneously did it up, and down, at her recent Maui wedding to Kristin Ogata. Up because she wore a custom, Madonna-worthy Jean Paul Gaultier gown (The Gossip frontwoman also modeled on the designer’s Spring ’11 catwalk), and down because she chose to go laid-back and barefoot during the nuptials. Ogata, however, wore a sweet pair of perforated white lace-ups with her spiffy white suit, and both accented their wedding ensembles with floral garlands and ear-to-ear grins. Congrats to the happy couple!

Georgia May Jagger Lets Herself Go

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Georgia May Jagger at the Hudson Jeans partyWith starring roles in campaigns for Miu Miu, Just Cavalli, Rimmel, and Madonna’s Material Girl Collection, Georgia May Jagger may be busy, but she hasn’t forgotten her roots—and those are with the jeans-maker Hudson. It was one of the first brands to feature the gap-toothed model—Jagger was a mere 16 years old when the California-based denim monolith tapped her for its 2009 ads—and that collaboration is still going strong.

Hudson, which, it was announced this week, is set to be acquired by Joe’s Jeans, threw a party last night at the new Selfridges Denim Floor for its Fall ’13 campaign, “#LETYOURSELFGO.” Lensed in black and white, the ads feature, you guessed it, Jagger. Donning a white jacket with little underneath, the model braved the London heat wave and chatted amiably with partygoers, which included Mary Charteris on the decks, playing to a crowd of mostly Jagger’s buddies, including Rosie Fortescue, Miquita Oliver, and Twilight actress MyAnna Buring.

Hudson simultaneously held an Instagram contest, asking fans to upload images of themselves “#LettingGo,” for which Jagger, a budding photographer herself, happily posed. But despite the power of the instant photo, Jagger told Style.com, “I think there is always going to be an appreciation of professional photography. Sure, you can take some great pictures on the iPhone, but I always travel with my Nikon camera, too. Certainly, photography is something I would like to do a lot more of in the future.”

She also took time to weigh in on her dad, who with all his performances of late, seems as busy as her. “I think [all his gigs] are great, and I managed to go on tour in the U.S. for a while earlier this summer, which was so fun. But I’m such a huge fan of Glastonbury, so to see them play there for the first time ever was amazing!”

Photo: Courtesy of Hudson Jeans

Haute Bijoux and a Gemstone Phone

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During the Fall ’13 Couture shows, which wrapped in Paris this weekend, houses debuted their jaw-dropping, and often blinding, haute joaillerie collections. Aside from a prominent seventies vibe, one thing came through loud and clear in the season’s jewelry presentations: a return to the statement stone (or perhaps we should say stones). Tina Isaac rounds up the most brilliant baubles from Dior, Chanel, Boucheron, Versace, and more, below.

A Cher Dior bracelet CHER DIOR:“I always create families, so I think of these pieces as the babies of Dear Dior,” said Victoire de Castellane during a preview of her new line of high jewelry for the house, which she has dubbed Cher Dior. “I was thinking of specific words—like “fascinating,” “sparkling”—and thinking about how to render those in gems.” True to de Castellane’s style, the resulting 21 pieces are “classic without being classic”—an array of symmetrically designed, smaller, lighter wares with colorful center stones, lacelike settings, and surprising color combinations. Take, for example, the Exquise Emeraude earrings, whose central gemstones mismatch, or the riot of colored sapphires in the Majestueuse Multicolore necklace. The Jardin Avec Fleurs earrings, whose floral design and pastel colors seem lifted straight out of the eighteenth century, were de Castellane’s starting point and remain her favorite. “It’s like a game,” she said. “These are pieces that you can wear without ever getting bored.”

Boucheron Perles D'Eclat RingBOUCHERON: This year, Boucheron, the first jeweler to open shop on the Place Vendôme, is celebrating its 120th anniversary at that address. Because the light is particularly beguiling in its south-facing atelier, head jewelry designer Claire Choisne has devised an eight-chapter story—one episode for each of the eight facets of the Place Vendôme—dubbed the Hôtel de la Lumière. One of her masterpieces picks up on a 1948 latticework necklace in sapphire and diamonds, while completely modern rock-crystal pieces are inlaid with pavé diamonds. The Perles d’Eclat necklace, for example, features large rock-crystal beads held together by the diamond slices that the house pioneered; the beads gradually progress from frosted to transparent, and inside the transparent ones sits a 3-D bouquet of diamonds.

One of Chanel's haute lionsCHANEL: Gabrielle Chanel was known to say that she was “a worker bee born under the sign of Leo.” Because the powerful, protective beast is also the symbol of Venice, where the designer traveled to recover from Boy Capel’s death, and because the house recently signed on to sponsor the restoration of the winged lion atop St. Mark’s Basilica, Chanel presented the timely Sous le Signe du Lion, a 58-piece collection inspired by the majestic feline. Pieces ranged from literal (a diamond-covered Lion Céleste which, extrapolated from the Venice city insignia, shows the beast in profile with his paw atop a sizable diamond) to the CGI-worthy (Lion Mosaique features a lion’s head emerging in three-quarter profile from a gemstone background). The Lion San Marco ring, created in tribute to St. Mark’s Basilica, is carved from a piece of lapis lazuli and set in gold and platinum with a center diamond. Only five of these were produced, and they sold out well before couture week began. Continue Reading “Haute Bijoux and a Gemstone Phone” »

Arianne Phillips on Dressing the Material Girl

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Madonna wearing Jean Paul Gaultier on her MDNA tourYou’d think that, after working with Madonna for 15 years, Arianne Phillips would have seen it all. But Phillips, the stylist and costume designer behind a decade and a half of Madonna videos and performances, as well as films like Walk the Line and W.E., says that the pop star’s 2012 MDNA world tour was like nothing she had ever experienced. “There were an epic amount, a tsunami, of costumes,” Phillips told Style.com of the show’s wardrobe, which included an updated iteration of Madonna’s iconic cone bra by Jean Paul Gaultier. “And we aren’t talking tennis shoes and sneakers—it’s costume and fashion.” Prior to the premiere of Madonna: The MDNA Tour, a documentary that airs on Epix tonight at 8 p.m., Phillips, who’s currently in London working on a new film, talked to Style.com about the MDNA costumes, Madonna’s collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier, and what it takes to put on an unforgettable show.

Where do you begin when designing costumes for Madonna?
Well, it always starts with the music, of course, and usually Madonna crafts a set list that’s part of a narrative. It’s a story with a beginning, middle, and end. This show was really about transformation. Each act had a different theme and costume had a purpose. This tour with her was definitely the biggest undertaking I have been a part of—on the technical side and on the conceptual side. It’s one thing to just design a costume for Madonna herself, but if you think about it, we had 23 dancers, five band members, and two background singers. And everyone requires multiple costume changes.

How do the costumes help express the show’s narrative?
We think of it as characters, and [Madonna] is playing a part. That character requires development and visuals in addition to the songs she’s singing. In the beginning of the show, she comes out dressed like a queen in a crown with a machine gun. She takes that off to reveal this super-vixen character that we kind of debuted in the “Girl Gone Wild” video. The next act is all about expression and having a message, and it opens up with “Express Yourself.” She’s wearing this homage to a forties majorette. The third act is “Vogue,” and it’s all about identity and gender-bending—iconic Madonna. She’s trying to figure out who she is again. And in the end, it’s a celebration, and she transforms into this powerful Joan of Arc character. Everyone is wearing mesh T-shirts, and it’s just like a really fun party. The tour gave her an opportunity to take classic songs like “Papa Don’t Preach” and give them a new twist. She has been performing these same songs forever, but she’s the queen of reinvention, and she creates an entertaining concept for the shows that keeps it interesting and relevant. The costumes have to underscore that, and they have to provoke and entertain.

How many costume changes did Madonna do throughout the course of the show?
The costumes are part of the choreography, so we have a lot of quick changes, and people are literally changing clothes under the stage. Madonna changes full costumes about four times. But then, for instance, for the “Vogue” act, she comes out in the Gaultier corset and then she disrobes. So by the end of the act, when she sings “Like a Virgin,” she is in a corset and a bra, and she has done different songs in different deconstructions of the outfit. So her costumes change for almost every song.

Continue Reading “Arianne Phillips on Dressing the Material Girl” »