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63 posts tagged "Maison Martin Margiela"

Editor Obsessions: Perfect Trousers From Maison Martin Margiela

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noah-editor-obsessionem>Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

I spend a lot of time thinking about pants. Much more than any sane man should. What I’ve determined is that a perfect-fitting trouser is incredibly difficult to find, but not impossible. The anonymous, lab-coated designers of Maison Martin Margiela have figured it out. Lately, I’m really feeling a tapered, slightly longer fit with a slight crease down the leg. And always blue.

Maison Martin Margiela tapered trousers, $392, Buy it now

Here’s What Our Editors Will Be Buying for Fall

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It may be warm here in New York today, but the Fall collections are already hitting stores and cooler weather is just around the corner. Our Fall Shopping Guide should help you ready your wardrobe for the autumn months, but for some further inspiration, have a look at our editors’ Fall picks, below.

Nicole Phelps

Nicole Phelps, Executive Editor

A good fashion week dress from Damir Doma and a good fashion week shoe from Saint Laurent, not necessarily to be worn together. And because I’m not quite ready to admit that the shows are five weeks away, a pair of rehabbed vintage Levi’s from the new denim brand Re/Dun to wear all August long.

Damir Doma dress, $780, Buy it now; Saint Laurent kitten heel, $595, Buy it now; Re/Dun straight skinnies, $232, for more information, visit redun.com.

Margiela

Katharine K. Zarrella, Associate News Editor

I have poor blood circulation and am thus constantly freezing. I can’t wear my vintage 1920s monkey-fur coat all the time (though I’d love to), so I’m planning to rely on this cropped goat-hair jacket from Maison Martin Margiela for some deeply chic everyday insolation.

Maison Martin Margiela goat-hair-trimmed wool-blend cropped jacket, $2,590, Buy it now

Sandro

Amber Kallor, Senior Beauty Editor

Should another Polar Vortex descend upon New York, I’ll be prepared with this oil-print anorak from Sandro. The sleek silhouette makes it easy to slip in and out of backstage, but the down filling provides plenty of warmth while I’m trekking from show to show.

Sandro oil-printed anorak, $775, Buy it now

Adam Lippes

Brittany Adams, Associate Fashion Editor

The bitter Polar Vortex we New Yorkers endured this past winter shook me to the core (I’m still in a state of disbelief walking around in bare legs this summer) and already has me preparing for the cold months ahead. If there’s one trend I’m eager to get my hands on next season, it’s a statement-making shearling. I’m currently pining over Adam Lippes‘ oh-so-cuddly navy belted topper. It’s the stylish equivalent of a bear hug and will be sure to earn me compliments while keeping out the chill.

Adam Lippes belted shearling coat, $3,290, Buy it now

Missoni

Rachel Walgrove, Social Media Editor

It’s time to upgrade the ponchos that are currently in my closet. In chenille, this Missoni knit basically doubles as a wearable blanket. Plus, it’s super-easy to throw on over just about anything.

Missoni chenille poncho, $250, Buy it now

APC

Noah Johnson, Deputy Editor

Louis Wong consistently makes impeccable leather jackets under his line for A.P.C., but this season’s Ferris jacket is the first one that I must own. Colored suede was among my favorite trends from the Spring ’15 men’s shows, but I’m impatient, so waiting until next season is out of the question.

A.P.C. Louis W. Ferris jacket, $1,395, Buy it now

Zana Bayne

Kristin Anderson, Assistant Editor of Special Projects

When fashion week hits, my current shoulder bag may not cut it. This stunning tote from Zana Bayne is big enough for a notebook, tape recorder, flats, and maybe even a pilfered Perrier (or two).

Zana Bayne pentagram handbag, $525, Buy it now

Gucci

Jessica Teves, Site Director

I’m a bit mad for cozy pastels, so this boxy Gucci peacoat is the perfect transitional piece for the cooler months—plus, it livens up my go-to uniform of skinny jeans and a white T-shirt.

Gucci wool double-breasted peacoat, $2,500. For more information, visit gucci.com.

Shrimps

Emily Farra, Editorial Coordinator

I love Shrimps’ irreverent approach to faux fur—there’s nothing stuffy or upper crust about it. This camel, blush, and orange coat features all of my favorite fall colors, plus it won’t break the bank like the real thing would. I’d much rather wear a faux color-blocked version than blend into the pack of women in the same chocolate-brown mink.

Shrimps faux-fur coat, $920, Buy it now

The Row

Erinn Hermsen, Assistant Managing Editor

Despite my Wisconsin roots, I’m a wimp when it comes to the cold. Sweaters are a key part of my daily uniform during the fall and winter months, and The Row‘s cozy cashmere version would be the perfect addition to my rotation.

The Row cashmere sweater, $4,550. For more information, visit saksfifthavenue.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

UPDATED: Nadège Vanhee Rumored to Be Hermès’ Top Pick

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UPDATE: Multiple industry sources have now confirmed to Style.com that Nadège Vanhee will succeed Christophe Lemaire as the creative director of womenswear at Hermès. The house is believed to be sending out an official announcement tomorrow morning.

hermesLet the rumors begin! According to WWD, word on the street is that behind-the-scenes star Nadège Vanhee, who cut her teeth at Delvaux and Maison Martin Margiela, worked under Phoebe Philo as the design director at Céline, and is now the design director at The Row, is Hermès’ top pick to succeed Christophe Lemaire as the head of womenswear. It would be nice to see someone like Vanhee, who has a wealth of experience and an eye for clean, sophisticated luxury, get a mega-gig like the one at Hermès—goodness knows she’s paid her dues. An announcement may be made as early as this week.

When I first heard this rumor, it reminded me of Jil Sander’s choice to hire Rodolfo Paglialunga—a designer who, save a stint as the creative director at Vionnet, earned his stripes working behind the scenes at Prada for 10 years. And then there’s the case of Julie de Libran’s appointment at Sonia Rykiel. Another under-the-radar gem, de Libran designed the pre-collections for Louis Vuitton, but was, of course, not as well known as the brand’s creative director and face, Marc Jacobs. Sometimes it makes sense to have a big name head up a big house. But it’s nice to see that the work of talented, though less famous, industry vets does not go unnoticed.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/Indigitalimages.com

Shop the Look: Future Perfect

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STL Future

After a week of larger-than-life couture shows, we noticed our favorite collections shared a central theme: the future. It wasn’t the stereotypical white-glove, sterile futurism you see in movies but rather an embrace of the brand-new and beautiful things we’ve never really seen before. At Dior, Raf Simons combined Marie Antoinette silhouettes with high-tech fabrics and mirrored eyeliner, while Karl Lagerfeld stayed true to form at Chanel and looked forward, forward, forward. It got us thinking about how we can incorporate new ideas into our own wardrobes. For starters, we’re still coveting Tamara Mellon’s genius leather legging-boot hybrid, and new jewelry designer Sophie Bille Brahe’s sculptural take on the pearl earring is at the top of our wish list. Metallic silver also feels particularly fresh; a modular choker or high-shine sunnies could make even a plain white tee look stunning. Shop all of our favorite forward-thinking pieces by Maison Martin Margiela, Alexander Wang, and more, below.

1. Tamara Mellon Sweet Revenge leather legging boots, $1,995, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Sophie Bille Brahe 14-karat gold ellipse earring with freshwater pearl, $800, available at stylebop.com

3. Alexander Wang zip peel away pullover, $595, available at shopbop.com

4. Maison Martin Margiela silver-tone choker, $995, available at net-a-porter.com

5. Dior So Real metal and plastic sunglasses in Palladium, $505, available at saksfifthavenue.com

Photo: Courtesy Photo

About Those V. Stiviano Visors…

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V. StivianoIt’s a funny thing, the connection between protection and clothing. On the most basic level, jackets, trousers, glasses, hats, et al. defend us from the elements. But sometimes, it’s the most superfluous accouterment that can make us feel invincible. Such is the case, to some extent, with V. Stiviano, the mistress of disgraced racist Clippers owner Donald Sterling, and her iridescent visors. No doubt you’ve seen photographs of her donning the accessory out and about in L.A. following the scandal in which Sterling forbade her from publicizing her friendships with black people. In a recent interview with Barbara Walters, Stiviano conceded that the full-face visors, which she owns in a myriad of hues, make it “easier to mask the pain.” Fair enough. And it’s not as though she’s the first visible public figure to hide behind headgear—you’d be hard-pressed to find a celebrity, mid-scandal or not, who hasn’t shielded themselves from prying eyes via giant sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats, hooded sweatshirts, or the like. But visage-enveloping visors are indeed an extreme—second only, perhaps, to the deeply bizarre black mask Leonardo DiCaprio sported at last year’s Venice Biennale. (Nothing says “under-the-radar” like channeling Darth Vader.)

“In the past, wearing things like visors or veils was more out of modesty, or maybe a sense of propriety,” explained The Museum at FIT’s associate curator of accessories, Colleen Hill. She cites the large-brimmed “poke” bonnets of the 1830s as an example. “In my opinion, they were an item of propriety. Not only did they shield the woman’s face from the sun, but they also provided a sense of security,” she told Style.com. “Today, [something like a visor], for celebrities in particular, acts as a psychological veil. Even if it’s something that’s transparent, it does create that little bit of a barrier. Making eye contact is such a personal thing, I think that is part of [face coverings'] appeal.”

Balenciaga and Alexander McQueen visors

Thanks to her shield, Stiviano has essentially been hiding from swarms of paparazzi in plain sight. But what’s funny is that while she’s sporting these visors as an invisibility cloak of sorts, they only make her more conspicuous. To wit, she’s more infamous now than before she broke out the accessory. And apparently, her Daft Punkian method of pseudo-protection has ignited somewhat of a visor boom. “We sold out this morning, and we’re waiting on a new shipment,” offered Gingie McLeod, the founder of Tribeca’s SaintChic store and label, which produces and carries Stiviano’s new staple, aptly dubbed the Paparazzi Visor. “They’re actually designed for tennis and hiking—for function. But people have been calling nonstop asking if this is the V. Stiviano visor and if it will cover their whole face or if anyone will be able to see them.” Before the craze began, McLeod had sold only four of the accessories.

Kanye west

Surely, Stiviano wasn’t aiming to start a trend with her quasi-disguise (or heck, maybe she was, though I seriously considered shelving my Chanel 2.55 after seeing a photo of her carrying a similar style). And certainly, part of this newfound visor obsession is in jest. (McLeod told us she just got a call from someone throwing a Stiviano-themed party.) But in truth, this perplexing “don’t look at me but do” mode of dressing has deep roots. Investigating visors alone, you might look back to Pierre Cardin or Paco Rabanne’s futuristic plastic shields from the 1960s, featured in numerous fashion shoots. More recently, there was Nicolas Ghesquière for Balenciaga’s giant Spring ’12 visor (inspired by an archival 1967 Balenciaga wedding hat), which completely covered the face and eyes. However, those who wore it, like Anna Dello Russo, attracted hoards of street-style paps. Same goes for Alexander McQueen’s mammoth Fall ’12 shades. Maison Martin Margiela’s couture masks should also be considered here: On the runway, they create a sense of uniform anonymity, yet on the street, they allow one to hide in style. But do MMM mask fans like Lady Gaga or Kanye West really want us to look away from their haute veils? Unlikely, particularly since West often wears his onstage. More than a striking visual, it has been interpreted as his commentary on fame, and it seems apt for someone who is both more open and uncensored than most celebrities and yet also a man of mystery.

Perhaps the trend is a sign of the times—not unlike our social media avatars, these outré shields afford us the opportunity to put ourselves out there without any risk of full-frontal exposure. They’re a superficial cushion—a buffer between the wearer and the outside world. Or maybe they’re just an ever-so-slightly less obvious plea for attention than the selfie. If that’s the case, let’s hope for a total transition—I’d rather look at an off-the-wall mask than an ill-angled iPhone snap any day.

Photos: Getty Images; Indigitalimages.com; Tommy Ton