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August 1 2014

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8 posts tagged "Maiyet"

Dare To Daria

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Last week, Style.com declared our hopes of seeing Canadian catwalker Daria Werbowy make a strong comeback at fashion week. We have yet to find out whether we’ll be seeing her on the runways, but in the meantime, we’ve just received the latest shots from Werbowy’s new Cass Bird-lensed online campaign for Maiyet (she also appeared in the label’s Spring campaign). Here, the top catwalker is on location in Chyulu Hills, Kenya (one of the countries where the brand partners with local artisans to work on its collection), showing off the Fall offerings, which are just hitting stores now. Look out for the Maiyet online shop, launching in the coming weeks. Style.com has the exclusive first look at the shots above.

Photo: Cass Bird / Courtesy of Maiyet

Around The World With Maiyet

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“We literally sat in the back of some man’s house and workshop in Kenya, with Silly Putty, making molds to show the artisans how to make this bracelet,” Maiyet president Kristy Caylor (pictured, right) told Style.com last night at the brand’s fête to celebrate its exclusive launch at Barneys. As she held up a sleek gold cuff, she explained, “The first time the bracelet came back, it looked nothing like this. The second time, it looked nothing like this. By the third time it was close, and by the fourth time it was beautiful. They came out with this huge smile on their faces when they knew they had finally achieved what we had asked for.”

Caylor, along with the brand’s co-founder Paul van Zyl (pictured, left) and creative director Gabriella Zanzani, shared similarly endearing stories about the making of Maiyet and their partnership with artisans in South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, India, and more throughout the dinner portion of the night. Among those seated at the Fred’s feast, prepared by chef Floyd Cardoz, was Christina Ricci (pictured, center), this year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee, Princess Khaliya Aga Khan, and Barneys’ Mark Lee. “I wish I had known who she [Gbowee] was in the elevator—I had no idea I was in the presence of greatness,” one female guest said as she sat down to the table.

Nearby, Ricci, who was dressed in head-to-toe Maiyet, told Style.com, “At first, I just looked at the designs and thought they were beautiful, and then hearing the concept behind the whole company, I thought it was really amazing.” Meanwhile, at the other end of the lucite table, wine glasses were breaking left and right as they fell into the water-filled moat running down the middle. “It’s still early in the night and people are already throwing glasses around,” joked van Zyl. “Well, as long as Lori Goldstein is OK, the evening can proceed,” he told the group as he looked at Goldstein, who was sitting directly to his right. Though Ricci had to head out after a few bites of her banana leaf-wrapped halibut (early-morning rehearsals for her off-Broadway performance in A Midsummer Night’s Dream called), the rest of the guests continued on through the Indian vanilla bean kulfi (well, assuming they didn’t lose their dessert silverware to the moat).

Photo: Joe Schildhorn / BFAnyc.com

The Making of Maiyet

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Introducing: Maiyet, a conscious-clothing label that’s similar in ethos to Edun but with an even more luxe sophistication (and price point). Though the brand officially launched for Spring ’12 in Paris, Maiyet’s founders—former human rights lawyer Paul van Zyl, former Band of Outsiders president Kristy Caylor, and Daniel Lubetzky—are celebrating the label’s exclusive arrival at Barneys New York stores this week. The collection ($595–$2,400) of military coats, simple blouses, dresses, and jewelry is so sleek shoppers might be oblivious to the fact that it’s the work of hand-block printers in Jaipur or metalsmiths outside Nairobi. How it works: Maiyet and its design team (a group that hails from the likes of Celine, Calvin Klein, and Ralph Lauren) partners with local artisans in countries around the globe to promote self-sufficiency and entrepreneurship in developing economies. A portion of the profits then goes into training and development. Here, in this Style.com exclusive video (below), a look at the artisans at work on the collection.

Photo: Courtesy of Maiyet