Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
6 posts tagged "Marc Newson"

Karl Lagerfeld, Cindy Sherman, and More Collaborate With Louis Vuitton

-------

Karl raf

An LV punching bag by Karl Lagerfeld? Why not! Today, WWD reports that Nicolas Ghesquière and Delphine Arnault are launching a new project, The Icon and the Iconoclasts, in which six heavy-hitting creatives will put their own spin on monogrammed bags and luggage. The designers, artists, and architects include Lagerfeld (who is, in fact, producing a punching bag), Cindy Sherman, Rei Kawakubo, Christian Louboutin, Frank Gehry, and Marc Newson.

The project instantly calls to mind the collaborations Marc Jacobs championed during his tenure at Vuitton: Stephen Sprouse, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Yayoi Kusama all interpreted the LV monogram in a unique way. But Ghesquière’s take brings Vuitton’s team-ups to a whole new level.

Images won’t be revealed until later this fall and prices will range between $2,725 and $5,450. That’s a pretty penny, but considering the bags will be available only for a few months, we’re thinking they qualify as the ultimate splurge.

Photo: Getty ImagesĀ 

Bono, Ive, and Newson Paint the Town (Red)

-------

Bono“Welcome to the fine art of separating people from their money,” joked Bono at the Saturday-night opening of Jony Ive and Marc Newson’s auction for Project (RED)—the seven-year-old charity dedicated to fighting HIV and AIDS in Africa. “The amount of money we raise tonight is important—it pays for lifesaving pills—but tonight is also about [generating] heat and excitement,” the rock-star-cum-philanthropist told Style.com. “We really could see the beginning of the end of AIDS in the next couple years, but only if we keep concentration.”

Held at Sotheby’s, the [Project] (RED) auction drew the likes of Harrison Ford, Helena Christensen, Jenna and Barbara Bush, Misha Nonoo, and a few regulars such as Larry Gagosian and Peter Brant. Indeed, the bidders brought the heat, raising over $26 million—in a matter of hours—for the fund. Predictions had forecast closer to $2 million.

“People don’t know who they are!” exclaimed Bono of Ive—the man behind the iPod, iPhone and Mac Pro Air—and famed industrial designer Newson. “These are people who changed the world, and these are two of the most important artists and designers in the world—they really like to do difficult things. This is their drug of choice.”

An Ive-and-Newson-customized Steinway went for $1.92 million—but not before Chris Martin took the stage to pound out “Beautiful Day,” with Bono on vocals (“Just to see if it works,” quipped Martin). Christy Turlington modeled a pink ruffled Azzedine Alaïa—”Just so we’re clear, we’re bidding on the dress,” joked the auctioneer. And a few items—a razor-thin, polished-steel desk ($1.7 million), a pair of solid rose-gold Apple EarPods ($380,000)—were designed specifically by Ive and Newson for the event.

A raucous party, with performances by Nile Rodgers (“Le Freak,” anyone?), Angélique Kidjo, and Bono and the Edge followed the auction. “By the time I wanted to bid, the prices were already too high!” shared André Saraiva from his post near the very well-stocked bar. Tough luck for Mr. André, but at least he was priced out for a very good cause.

Photo: Getty Images

The Latest From Pitti: Less Is More

-------

The economic news from Italy, Pitti Immagine’s ambassadors admitted at a diplomatic lunch mission today, is not good. But they contend they have every reason to be sanguine. The biannual Pitti trade fairs—menswear Pitti Uomo, womenswear Pitti W, children’s Pitti Bimbi, and the textile fair Pitti Filati—draw a more international crowd season after season; for the 83rd fair, to be held January 8-11 of next year, a full 40 percent of the vendors are international.

The big news so far has been the invited guests: Kenzo, which will present the Fall ’13 menswear collection, and Maison Kitsuné, which will stage its first ever show for women’s pre-collection. At lunch, Kenzo designer Humberto Leon and Carol Lim (left) professed their gratitude for the Pitti invitation, even if accepting it means their hectic international schedules, overseeing Kenzo and Opening Ceremony, became that much more hectic. (Leon estimated that he is now on a plane once every five days, with key stops in Florence, Tokyo, Paris, and L.A.) But in their way, Leon and Lim are shaking up the Pitti orthodoxies: They are, Pitti CEO Raffaello Napoleone said with a gasp, showing during the afternoon instead of the usual evening spot.

Kenzo and Kitsuné both hit a sweet spot a hair below the usual designer price point, which is likely no coincidence. “Smart casual is doing well,” Pitti Chairman Gaetano Marzotto announced in his opening remarks, calling out a bright spot in the market. (And adding, to a mostly tie-less crowd, “Like you are dressed now—you in particular.”) But the main-stage designers won’t be the only ones showing at Pitti. Among the other debuts will be Adidas SLVR, G-Star (which will show its latest collection created in collaboration with industrial designer Marc Newson), the returning Pitti veteran Andrea Pompilio, and the adored Japanese line White Mountaineering.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos/GoRunway.com

The London Scene, From An Old Hooker Den To A Neoclassical Manse

-------

Location, location, location. The realtor’s mantra came to mind on Thursday night in London. First, the NEWGEN event at Somerset House, the new home of London fashion week. The neoclassical structure is one of the city’s most elegant riverside buildings, with a sweeping terrace that was particularly seductive in the summer gloaming. It’s also ideal for shoots—i-D was photographing the NEWGEN winners as they were announced. Amanda Harlech let Robert Forrest tear her away for a hard-hatted tour of the building site that will eventually become Robin Hurley’s new club. It’s in Shepherd’s Market, a louche-ly quaint hooker hangout of centuries past, and Rifat Ozbek had created a convincingly decadent mock-up of what the finished product may look like. Then, while Harlech linked up with Sarah Mower and the fashion world at the Royal College of Art’s graduate show, a smattering of London’s art, pop, and design aristocracy joined some genu-wine lords and ladies at Lancaster House, where HRH Prince Robert of Luxembourg was hosting a dinner to celebrate the 75th anniversary of his grandfather’s acquisition of Château Haut-Brion. There’ll be eight dinners in eight key cities around the world, but how many of them will be set in a spectacularly maintained neoclassical (again, but it’s such a good look) mansion that was once assessed as the most valuable private house in London, with St. James Palace on one side and Buckingham Palace on the other, just across—more or less—the velvety greensward? Speaking of velvet, the main course of lamb was served with a Château Haut-Brion 1961 that smacked unforgettably of velvet smoke. Those savoring it included Viscount and Viscountess Linley, Bryan Ferry and Amanda Shepherd, Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld and Erin Heatherton, and Charlotte Stockdale and Marc Newson, whose boy-toy table talk with Matthew Freud was—according to Camilla Lowther, who was parked between the two—all about planes. Their own, one assumes. Speaking of taking flight, Serena, Marchioness of Bute, looked heaven-bound in a fishtailed goddess dress by Roland Mouret (pictured).

Photo: Dave M. Benett / Getty Images

Blasblog: Hardy Boys and Girls

-------



















The chic set celebrated the joy of high heels last night at the 10-year anniversary fête for Parisian cobbler Pierre Hardy. Actress Joana Preiss, who spent the majority of the night sitting down with the likes of friends Nicolas Ghesquière and Hide Nakata, explained that the real pain after breaking her foot two months ago in a freak pool accident wasn’t the fracture, the cast, or the healing. No, what upset Preiss was that she couldn’t wear the funky, metallic Hardy stilettos she loves. “But he has been helping ease the pain,” she smiled, pointing to a pair of flat crocodile boots the designer had given her for the evening. The relationship between pain and pleasure is integral to the sorts of shoes that Hardy prides himself on creating, of course. “Can you have one without the either?” he asked. Replied stylist Charlotte Stockdale, there with husband Marc Newson: “As long as they look good and sexy, it’s worth it.

Photo: Andre Lucat/SGP