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August 23 2014

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22 posts tagged "Marilyn Monroe"

Marilyn Monroe, John Wayne, and More Remembered in Christie’s Famous and Infamous

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Marilyn Monroe & Russell PoseFor lifelong fans of icons like Marilyn Monroe, John Lennon, and T.E. Lawrence, seeing their most famous articles of clothing is the closest thing to traveling back in time. Former banker David Gainsborough Roberts is one of those fans, and he amassed dozens of collectibles over the past 20-plus years. To share his passion with the world, he has opened an exhibit titled Famous and Infamous at Christie’s in London. He told the Daily Mail, “In 1989 I bought a Marilyn Monroe film costume and my life changed completely.” Included in the exhibit is the red sequined dress Monroe wore in the 1953 film Gentleman Prefer Blondes and John Wayne’s signature Stetson hat. Pharrell, take note: The competition for most celebrated topper of the year just got really steep.

Famous and Infamous will run through September 2 at Christie’s in London.

Photo: The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images 

Rita Ora Goes Marilyn for Roberto Cavalli

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rita ora for roberto cavalli

Is Rita Ora the modern-day Marilyn Monroe? Roberto Cavalli certainly thinks so. The designer tapped the saucy songstress to be the face of his Fall ’14 campaign, in which she appears pinup glam with platinum locks. An exclusive look at the Francesco Carrozzini-lensed ads debuts above. “I love Rita’s energy—she’s strong, charismatic, and she’s a Renaissance woman,” Cavalli told Style.com. “I chose to portray her as a modern-day Marilyn, a contemporary interpretation of iconic sensuality.” Does this mean Mr. Cavalli prefers blonds?

The Brooklyn Museum’s Going Head Over Heels

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LouboutinWe’re the first to admit that heels are a powerful thing. Each season we manage to add a few (or a dozen) must-have pairs to our overstuffed wardrobes. And why? Is it because heels are sexy? Flattering? Outfit-making? Or just fun to wear? The Brooklyn Museum will explore these questions (and many more) with its upcoming exhibition Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe. On view from September 10, the exhibit will feature 160 heels from as early as the 17th century to today. A main focus will be the sculptural, architectural, and artistic qualities of high heels, which range from the wearable to the avant-garde. On one end of the spectrum will be designs by household names like Manolo Blahnik, Christian Louboutin, Chanel, and Roger Vivier, on the other, conceptual styles by Iris van Herpen, Elsa Schiaparelli, Zaha Hadid, and many more.

Highlights from the exhibit include Marilyn Monroe’s Ferragamo stilettos from 1959; silk, metal, and glass mules by Vivier for House of Dior from 1960; Céline’s mink-covered pumps from Spring ’13; eight-inch platforms designed by Rem D. Koolhaas for Lady Gaga; and mind-bending 3-D-printed heels by Van Herpen.

In addition to the show, there will be a fully illustrated catalog with essays by Stefano Tonchi, Lisa Small, and Caroline Weber, as well as six short films inspired by high heels. The films were commissioned from artists including Steven Klein, Nick Knight, and Marilyn Minter. The full exhibition will also be traveling to other venues, which have yet to be announced.

Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe will run from September 10, 2014 through February 15, 2015 at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238. For more information, visit brooklynmuseum.org.

Photo: Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum 

Let’s Hear It For The Girl

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Marilyn MonroeToday’s sci-fi epics (ahem, Hunger Games), throwback flicks (The Wolf of Wall Street being the latest, with its portrayal of down-and-dirty nineties bankers), and witty dramas (Blue Jasmine, anyone?) have some pretty impressive wardrobe teams. But when it comes to the most iconic on-screen ensembles, the films of yore take the cake. According to a poll conducted by the U.K.’s British Heart Foundation (it held the study to promote its “Ram Up Red” campaign, which raises awareness about heart disease), Marilyn Monroe’s William Travilla-designed white halter frock (yes, that one) from 1955′s The Seven Year Itch was at the top of the list. In second place was Judy Garland’s blue gingham dress and ruby red slippers from 1939′s The Wizard of Oz, and Olivia Newton-John’s second-skin black look from Grease, Ursula Andress’ white bikini in Dr. No, and the ebony Givenchy gown Audrey Hepburn wore in Breakfast at Tiffany’s came in at third, fourth, and fifth place, respectively. As for the win, we’re sure Ms. Monroe—or rather, her character, The Girl—would think it’s “just delicate.”

Photo: Courtesy of mptvimages.com

Frankly, My Dear, the V&A Gives a Damn

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Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind

About Hollywood’s history, that is. On the heels of last year’s exhibition Hollywood Costume, which displayed ensembles worn by one hundred of cinema’s most iconic characters, the London-based museum will open a show exploring the life of legendary British actress Vivien Leigh this fall. The late actress was married to Laurence Olivier, palled around with the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Tennessee Williams, and the Queen Mother, and is best known for her role as high-strung Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind.

Photo: Getty Images