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August 22 2014

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21 posts tagged "Marina Abramovic"

Net-a-Porter’s True Originals

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Marina Abramovic's jumpsuits for Net-a-PorterAnyone pondering the future of couture needs to check out what Net-a-Porter is cooking up for fall. On Wednesday, Net-a-Porter’s fashion director, Holli Rogers, invited a handful of editors to the Palais de Tokyo to catch a glimpse of how the e-tailer is moving the needle: Come September, the site will be selling one-off couture-inspired creations by contemporary artists George Condo, Terence Koh, Vik Muniz, Marina Abramovic, and Mickalene Thomas. Dubbed Art Capsul, the project was curated by Stacy Engman, an art-world veteran and fashion devotee, who approached the artists about creating garments inspired by the tradition of haute couture. “I wanted the artists to use their artwork to conceive a garment from beginning to end,” said Engman. “The process in fashion and in art is very similar in that both artists and designers are striving to create visual experiences that did not exist before. But this project is about contemporary art, and that is about the future. It’s just that this is art that can be worn.” No fashion designer is affiliated with this project.

As it turns out, Abramovic had been mulling the idea for a couple of decades: Her “jumpsuit of the century” is actually a set of seven jumpsuits in various colors, inspired by the planets. (Mars is blue; Mercury, red; Venus, white; etc.) She strategically incorporated magnets into the wares for their energetic properties. Koh dreamed up a coat covered in 20,000 pearls of different sizes, while Condo delivered a cheeky little topper with fur trim and pom-pom ties. “The whole point was to challenge people’s ideas about what we’re doing,” explained Rogers. “It’s art, it’s fashion, and you can wear it if it suits you.” Not to mention your wallet: These pieces are slated to be sold at “art-world prices.” And while the price tags for these one-of-a-kind wares aren’t yet confirmed, we have a feeling that Dolce & Gabbana’s Fall ’13 Lava dress, which is set to retail on Net-a-Porter this month for about $48,873, might just seem like a steal in comparison.

Photo: Courtesy of Net-a-porter

Wild ’n’ Out: Gisele Goes Guerrilla for BLK DNM

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Gisele Bundchen by Johan Lindeberg 

At this very moment, cult sub-Fourteenth Street denim label BLK DNM is plastering downtown Manhattan with its newest “Wild” poster campaign—the company’s only form of advertising since its inception in 2011. Lensed by the brand’s founder and creative director, Johan Lindeberg, the sixth installment of the guerrilla promos feature none other than genetic Powerball winner Gisele Bündchen. But this isn’t your standard Gisele fare—in fact, all that’s shown is the model’s mile-long legs and covetable Brazilian posterior in a pair of second-skin jeans as she’s inspecting the engine of a vintage automobile.

 

Gisele's Wild Poster“We drove together in that car to Brooklyn for the shoot,” Lindeberg laughed. “It’s an ’85 Mercedes!” The designer and model celebrated their collaboration last night at BLK DNM’s Lafayette Street store, where guests such as Marina Abramovic, Theophilus London, and Waris Ahluwalia perused an expansive series of Lindeberg x Bündchen imagery. In darkened gray scale, the arguably austere shots depict Bündchen in various states of undress and undulation. “Maybe it’s a little bit the dark winters [in Sweden], and both my grandparents were priests,” said Lindeberg, addressing his style. “I like that kind of deeper expression, somehow.”

 

Bündchen, perhaps, paraphrased the Lindeberg aesthetic best. “He sees women as real—or, he has a very real idea of women. There’s no retouching. There’s a rawness that’s just kind of who you are, you know?”

 

An exhibition of Lindeberg’s Gisele portraits will be on view at BLK DNM’s 237 Lafayette Street boutique for the next month.

The Holy Mother And Child—Mariacarla Edition

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It’s friends and family at Givenchy this season. For the Spring ’13 campaign, shot by Mert & Marcus and styled by Carine Roitfeld and Katy England, Riccardo Tisci got intimate. “They are the people I love and who love me. It’s about family,” he said in a statement. “Something that is difficult to find in today’s world.” The Givenchy family (and now campaign) includes Kate Moss and Marina Abramović, among others, but it also includes a flesh-and-blood mini-family of its own: longtime Tisci muse Mariacarla Boscono and her own baby daughter, Marialucas. “When I look at this photo, I feel blessed with all the magic that surrounds me—my loves, my affections,” Boscono told Style.com. “Something very strong that embraces the love I feel for my daughter, so special and overwhelming that words would not be enough…and the concept of family that ties my soul with that of Riccardo, which stands in my life as something very, very special.” The campaign shot at left debuts exclusively on Style.com. A behind-the-scenes video debuts below. Continue Reading “The Holy Mother And Child—Mariacarla Edition” »

Announcing Abramovic, The Institute

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“There comes a moment in every artist’s life when it is important to ask, what is going to be my legacy,” said Marina Abramovic this morning. She announced one answer to her own question at a private presentation and breakfast: with plans for her namesake institute in Hudson, New York, slated to open in 2014. Despite being early Monday morning, post-Frieze, a crowd of art-philes—including gallerist Serge Le Borgne, architect Shohei Shigematsu, and Milan city councilor Stefano Boeri—assembled inside the Performance Dome at MoMA PS1 for a first glimpse at the long-anticipated Marina Abramovic Institute, dedicated to the preservation of performance art.

After espresso and quiche, MoMA chief curator at large Klaus Biesenbach introduced Abramovic, who described the mission of the institute. “After my three-month performance at MoMA, I realized that only long-duration works have serious potential to change the viewer, because there is no division between normal daily activity and performance,” she explained. “I wanted to create a laboratory where the public can learn how to view performance work in a comfortable, no-stress space.” Helmed by architect Rem Koolhaas, the former cinema-turned-tennis club will feature a theater with surrounding classrooms, a library, and a gym as well as crystal chambers and “levitation rooms” for viewers to “regenerate.” According to Abramovic, visitors will be asked to sign contracts, giving their “word of honor” that they will stay for at least two and a half hours in the exhibit, and wear lab coats with noise-canceling headphones to experience her long-duration oeuvres, which can last from six hours to a whopping 365 days. (Fret not—Abramovic is creating recliner-cum-wheelchair devices, in which guests can sleep and be rolled in and out of performances at their leisure, or they can retreat to nearby hotels, which she eventually hopes to build for the influx of visitors.) With a fundraising target of $8 million, Abramovic has certainly set her sights high. Her ultimate goal? “To become a brand like Coca Cola, but for hard-core performance art.”

Photo: Courtesy of OMA

Toasting The Artist Who Saved The Standard From Itself

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Multimedia artist Marco Brambilla’s (pictured) work is very familiar to a certain partygoing set. He’s the man behind the trippy elevator video, Civilization, that plays on the long ride to the 18th floor of the Standard hotel. “I’ve seen Marco’s work too many times going up to Boom Boom Room,” Waris Ahluwalia admitted last night a private dinner to fête the artist’s latest exhibition, RPM, at the hotel’s High Line Room and Terrace. “I know every scene and every bouncing breast.”

It almost wasn’t to be. “We originally had a lame concept for the elevators: gold bricks to convey that we were the ‘gold standard’ of hotels,” André Balazs said in a toast. The audience—which included Cecilia Dean, Marina Abramovic, Jacqueline Schnabel, Dustin Yellin, and Casey Neistat—groaned. “It was a terrible idea.”

When the lights dimmed, the guests dutifully put on red stereoscopic shades they had been given to watch the psychedelic 3-D video, featuring a continuous loop of racing clips from the Monza Grand Prix processed with archived Ferrari photos and set to the sound of roaring Formula One engines. Midway through the screening, a rowdier set spilled in. The group, including Theophilus London, had come from the OHWOW fête taking place just upstairs to check out what Brambilla had created. “I wanted to capture the feeling of euphoria and danger, which are equally present in the mental state of a driver during a race,” the artist explained. Luckily, cabs were the preferred mode of transport home.

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com