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July 25 2014

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18 posts tagged "Mario Sorrenti"

EXCLUSIVE: Olivier Rousteing, Along With Jourdan Dunn, Binx Walton, Cara Delevingne, and More, Push the New “Balmain Reality” in the Brand’s Fall Ads

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balmain

How does Olivier Rousteing top last season’s Rihanna-fronted Balmain campaign? With not one, but six faces. The brand’s new imagery for Fall, lensed by Mario Sorrenti and art-directed and styled by Katie Grand, features Binx Walton, Cara Delevingne, Jourdan Dunn, Ysaunny Brito, Issa Lish, and Kayla Scott. Sporting Rousteing’s safari-inspired Fall fare, his stars nicely embody the heady, hard-edged sensuality he sent down the catwalk in February.

What made the Love editor in chief and über-stylist a natural choice? “She can break all the rules, and that’s what I really, really love from her,” Rousteing told Style.com of Grand. “It was really a strong decision for me and for Balmain, because we never had a campaign with so many girls and expressing this kind of vision. Katie understood from the beginning, and she translated that with the casting and with the looks that we shot.” The designer’s only quibble about his Brit friend and collaborator? “She has the strongest accent ever! As a French boy, you have a hard time understand[ing] an American, so when you have a strong accent from England, it’s like, sometimes I tell Katie, ‘I’m sorry, I don’t understand.’ Sometimes [she talks] and I’m just quiet an entire minute, she’ll look at me and say, ‘You don’t understand, right?’ And I’m like, ‘No.’”

Balmain

Rousteing was a longtime admirer of Sorrenti, too, noting that he appreciated the photographer’s particular vision of femininity. One need only glance at, say, Sorrenti’s iconic ads for Calvin Klein Obsession or his 2012 Pirelli calendar to grasp the languid sensuality that makes him a logical choice for Balmain. It’s Sorrenti’s talent for the enigmatic, however, that’s most evident here; there’s not much skin from a lensman who’s built his name on nudes. The ads themselves serve as an allegory for Rousteing’s evolving take on sex appeal. “My first show was a lot of leg, a lot of skin, and that was my vision: body-conscious dresses. But my [latest] is all about being covered up from head to toe, and that’s my new vision of sexiness,” Rousteing said. “I still think a girl can be sexy in an oversize khaki jacket or a parka, [or] black tights and a long, midi-cut skirt. I’m growing up at the same time my collections are growing.”

Perhaps most notable, though, are the ads’ message of diversity—one that Rousteing has to some become a de facto poster boy for. “I’m French, I’m black, and I’m proud to be at Balmain, but this is a message of freedom and globalism,” he said backstage in February. Both on his catwalks and in his campaigns, the designer has been active in promoting diversity by casting girls of color and of varied backgrounds. The Fall images boast models from the Dominican Republic, Great Britain, Mexico, and the U.S. As a young designer, Rousteing’s awareness is something that’s come to him with time. “My first collection was all about making clothes, and it was really, really important for me to work on the tailor[ing] and on the clothes, but I realized that day after day and step by step, I’m not only doing clothes,” he offered. “I think fashion is all about a vision that you can give to people; it’s [about] expressing that passion. We need to show how diversity is important.” The new campaign, then, is another step in that vision. As Rousteing himself tells it, “I think it’s showing a new reality—the Balmain reality.”

Photos: Mario Sorrenti for Balmain

Thirty-Five Years Later, Lori Goldstein Is Still Excited

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Lori Goldstein

If you’ve picked up an issue of W, Vogue Italia, or Vanity Fair in the last thirty-five years, you’ve probably seen the work of Lori Goldstein. Famed for her expertly piled-on, more-is-more aesthetic (with the exception of that iconic Demi Moore cover, on which the actress appeared nude, pregnant, and accessorized only with diamonds), Goldstein has collaborated with all the greats—from Donatella Versace to Annie Leibovitz to Mario Testino. On November 1, the New York-based stylist (along with Harpers Design) will release Style Is Instinct, a retrospective tome comprising her most memorable photographs, with a heartfelt introduction from close friend Steven Meisel. “It’s kind of the crescendo of my styling career,” offered Goldstein, who currently serves as the editor at large at Elle and designs her own line for QVC. While sitting in her closet, which Goldstein told us is filled with “every Proenza tie-dye shirt, Dries Van Noten’s entire Fall collection, and plenty of print and embellishment,” the image-maker talks the art of styling, how the industry has changed, and why, “after 400 years” in the biz, she’s still excited.

In Steven Meisel’s introduction to the book, he calls you an artist. Do you feel that styling is an art?
You know, if you had asked me that ten years ago, I probably would have laughed. I do, and honestly, not to use that term loosely, but I think that I’ve learned that when you follow your heart and you do something that you love and you’re creative, that you have an artist’s mind, and that your lifestyle is very different. I think tapping into that for all of us is so important. So today, I have to say, yes.

"Style Is Instinct" by Lori GoldsteinThe title of the book is Style Is Instinct. When did you first realize that you had the instinct for style? When I was born. That’s been my gift through life. I’ve just always loved beautiful things; I was always attracted to putting things together; I always loved playing with clothes; I loved, loved, loved clothes. I didn’t even call it “fashion,” because that’s a whole other thing. I was drawn to sparkly, gorgeous things. I was born in Ohio, and somehow I just saw the beauty in it all, thank God.

How do you feel that the role of the stylist has changed throughout the course of your career?
That’s one of the reasons I wanted to do the book. We all know how it’s changed—it’s become much more of a business. When I started going to shows, it was like Helmut Lang and Ann Demeulemeester, and this really organic, just awesome creative time; I was so lucky. I worked at Allure. We did Vogue Italia. And there was really no such thing as credits. We just did whatever we wanted, which was amazing. But I love the time now because I also love a challenge. Today there are parameters and there are rules, but within that, you’ve got to make something incredible. Continue Reading “Thirty-Five Years Later, Lori Goldstein Is Still Excited” »

Mad (For) Max

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In the waning hours of 2012, New York Times critic Cathy Horyn took to her blog to weigh in on her favorites of the year and the bright spots of the year to come. Among the winners were likely choices such as Dior and Céline, but more unusual was La Horyn’s calling out of a few key Spring ad campaigns. Two of her three picks—Inez and Vinoodh’s for Miu Miu and Steven Meisel’s for Prada—you’ve already seen on Style File. The third is Mario Sorrenti’s for Max Mara: “The approach is reductive and strong,” she wrote. “You suspect he said, ‘Let’s just make something that is beautiful.’ ” In the service of displaying and promoting the beautiful, here it is.

Photo: Mario Sorrenti / Courtesy of Max Mara

Kate On Kate

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If modeling has a G.O.A.T., it’s got to be Kate the Great—and without much competition. It’s hard to imagine most other models earning a full tome dedicated to their greatest hits; Moss’ comes out from Rizzoli next month, designed by Fabien Baron and with text by Jefferson Hack and Jess Hallett. Above, an exclusive shot of Kate clutching Kate. She’s got the Testino cover in her mits—shot in Arles in 1996—but it’s only one of eight possible versions. The others, below, include shots by (left to right, top to bottom) Craig McDean, Inez & Vinoodh, David Sims, Corinne Day, Juergen Teller, Mario Sorrenti, and Mert & Marcus.

Photos: Ally Landale; Courtesy of Rizzoli

Manish Down At Paco Rabanne, Get Your “Yeezy” Necklace Now, And More…

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What’s a week in fashion news without the swing of a revolving door? Word came this morning that Paco Rabanne and its artistic director, Manish Arora, have parted ways after two seasons. [WWD]

Kanye West’s $6,000 hoof heels aren’t the only items from his clothing collection to make their way into an actual store; Colette is now carrying his gold “Yeezy” necklace, too, the one he wore during his Givenchy-clad appearance (pictured) at Occupy Wall Street. [Rolling Stone]

Those minimum-age requirements for runway models (and now, Vogue models) don’t apply everywhere. Natalia Vodianova’s 6-year-old daughter, Neva Vodianova Portman, is making her modeling debut, showing off a dress in an ad campaign from children’s line Caramel to support her mom’s Naked Heart Foundation charity. [Vogue U.K.]

Mommy Sheerest? A very pregnant Julia Restoin-Roitfeld shows baby bump and more on the cover of the new i-D, lensed by Mario Sorrenti. [Styleite]

Photo: Timothy A. Clary / Getty Images