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April 18 2014

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17 posts tagged "Mario Sorrenti"

Supporting Haiti, The D’Orazio (Or Weber, Or Sorrenti) Way

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Repetition we can get behind: another day, another Haiti fundraiser. This latest push for relief comes by way of ROSE Charities and FOTORELIEF, which have partnered to organize A Picture Saves a Thousand Lives. The short of it: Round up a few of the best photographers in the world, many of them longtime fashion veterans; auction off 130 prints by the masters; send the cash to Haiti. Of course, with the likes of Patrick Demarchelier, Bruce Weber, Mario Sorrenti, Sante D’Orazio, and Greg Kadel involved, the bidding’s bound to be fierce. “Everything’s been donated, down to the frames. People have really come out for this,” ROSE president (and former model) Noot Seear says of the impressive roster, curated by FOTORELIEF director John Gettings. “It’s really the best of each photographer, pieces that represent them. We really wanted art pieces, things you want to hang on the wall.” Given the participants and their penchant for stylish nudity, you may want to make that a high wall—nursery art this isn’t. But with pieces like D’Orazio’s (above, bids start at $750), grown-up glossy obsessives (or prurient bachelors) should find plenty to love.

A Picture Saves a Thousand Lives auction will be held tomorrow from 7 to 10 p.m. at Milk Gallery, 450 W. 15th Street, NYC. Suggested donation is $25. For more information, visit www.fotorelief.org.

In Conversation With The Journal‘s Michael Nevin

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When Michael Nevin launched The Journal ten years ago, the magazine was a skinny black-and-white zine dedicated to all things skate and snowboard. A decade later, the issue of The Journal that comes out tomorrow comprises, among other features, new work by Jonathan Meese in memorial to Dash Snow, semi-destroyed photographs of Kate Moss and Mario Sorrenti taken from photographer Glen Luchford’s archives, a lengthy interview with Walter Pfeiffer, and a supplement dedicated to William Eggleston. The Journal is glossy now, and hard-bound, and printed in color; there’s a gallery in Williamsburg attached to it, too. Contributions from the likes of Juergen Teller, Helmut Lang, Mark Gonzales, and Miranda July fill The Journal archives. Not bad for a magazine first stapled together at a highway-side Kinko’s in New England by a kid who was all of 19. Now, more transformations are afoot. The tenth anniversary issue of The Journal is physically larger than the previous one, it’s been given an engaging redesign by Peter Miles, and it includes the magazine’s first-ever fashion spread, starring Jamie Bochert. And yet, for all that, The Journal has changed less than it might appear. “The magazine has always been—and I hope will always be—an honest reflection of my interests,” explains Nevin. “It’s just that those interests have shifted over time.” Here, Nevin talks to Style.com about dialing up the Internet, cold-calling art stars, and texting Rodarte.

This is going to sound like a snotty question, but—why launch a magazine? This is the digital age, or hadn’t you heard?
When I first started The Journal, “online” wasn’t really a thing yet. I mean, I can remember signing up for my first e-mail account after I published the first issue of The Journal. I just wasn’t looking for the things that interested me on the Web. At the time, I was looking at magazines. Really looking—I mean, I grew up in Vermont, and there weren’t too many progressive publications around, so I’d have to work to cobble together bits and pieces of what interested me from the mainstream stuff I had access to. I’d spend hours in the bookstore, poring over magazines. And there was nothing out there covering this whole creative universe that derives from skateboarding and snowboarding. I wanted to read about that, and having just come off a year entering pro contests as a snowboarder, I felt like starting a magazine was a way to continue being a part of something I’d loved.

In other words, magazine-ness—print—runs deep in you.
Yeah, it does. But for reasons that are more than sentimental. I think they’re more than sentimental, anyway. I love the printed image, I love being able to open up the magazine and flip through the pages, I love being able to give a copy to somebody, I love seeing it in stores. I love what it represents. It’s essentially my curation in those pages, and to send the magazine overseas, and know that what I’ve worked on is being looked at, in the same material way, is really fantastic.

Continue Reading “In Conversation With The Journal‘s Michael Nevin” »

Teen Jagger, Lily’s Lucky Charms, And More…

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Meet Georgia May: The youngest of Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall’s progeny is the new face of Hudson Jeans, the only company that seems to have any money these days. And, as if one insanely famous name weren’t enough, the ads were shot by Mario Sorrenti and styled by Camilla Nickerson. See what we mean about the money? [WWD]

If Sean Avery is to be believed, Alexandra Richards is an impressive multitasker. The hockey star espied the model-slash-DJ getting a pedicure while spinning at Surf Lodge in Montauk. [Page Six]

Lily Allen’s new jewelry lines features pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. OK, not exactly, but it does have poodles. [Vogue U.K.]

Photo: Jonathan Hordle / Rex USA

Photo: Jim Dyson / Getty Images

Latin Dance

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Mango has executed a neat do-si-do, replacing longtime brand ambassador Penélope Cruz with her Vicky Cristina Barcelona co-star Scarlett Johansson. The actress seems to be channelling Marilyn Monroe via Grease‘s Sandy in this exclusive sneak-peek photo from the Mario Sorrenti-shot Fall ’09 campaign.

Photo: Courtesy of Mango

Getting Connected With Jefferson Hack

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AnOther Fashion Book, a greatest hits compilation of the fashion photography that has been featured in AnOther Magazine and AnOther Man over the past eight years, makes its stateside debut today—and we have Karl Lagerfeld to thank for it. Well, not entirely. “It was actually Karl who came up with the idea of doing a book,” explains AnOther founder and editor in chief Jefferson Hack, who edited the collection. “I was at the atelier in Rue Cambon, and he said to me, you know, you have this amazing archive, you should compile something that can be available and accessible to people as a resource. And,” Hack adds, “he said he’d publish it.” Needless to say, that was a pitch Hack was eager to run with. The first in a series of three book to be published by Lagerfeld’s imprint 7L and distributed via Steidl, AnOther Fashion Book features work by photographers such as Terry Richardson, Craig McDean, Mario Sorrenti, and Nick Knight. A book of portraits from the magazines will follow this fall, and a collection of AnOther and AnOther Man interviews will round out the trilogy next year. Here, Hack talks to Style.com about stripping out, slowing down, hanging Kate Moss, and dancing.

 

One of the things that intrigues me about this book is that you’ve let the images stand on their own. There’s no layout, no dates, no captions—no suggestion, really, that they were ever published in a magazine.

That was one of the first decisions we made when we began working on the book—to strip the magazine element out. This isn’t a book about AnOther Magazine. It’s a book about photography, and we wanted it to feel timeless. So we’ve taken the most stirring images and laid them out simply and created a running order that’s non-chronological, nonlinear. And not even entire spreads, often—just selections. My hope is that people who have never seen a copy of AnOther will come to this book and find it compelling.

Continue Reading “Getting Connected With Jefferson Hack” »