Style.com

April 21 2014

styledotcom The hotel goodies you'll definitely want to hoard: stylem.ag/1kS65JI

Subscribe to Style Magazine
46 posts tagged "Mario Testino"

Bottoms Up: Kate Moss’ (Mostly) Liquid Birthday Lunch

-------

Kate Moss Anyone who follows fashion news was well aware that yesterday was Kate Moss’ 40th birthday. Naturally, the super was sent a garden’s worth of flowers, hoards of neatly wrapped packages from all her favorite designers, and an alleged 1970s Porsche from Topshop’s Sir Philip Green. As for her party, that took the form of a boozy, two-hour lunch at London’s posh 34 restaurant. And while guests like Naomi Campbell, John Galliano, Mario Testino, and Stella McCartney supposedly racked up a casual 5,000-pound bill, the Telegraph writes that the crew ordered nothing but appetizers, champagne, and cocktails. Considering they were feting the woman responsible for the phrase, “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels,” we’re not terribly surprised by the menu. What’s more is Moss’ latest reported sound bite: Post-party, she’s said to have quipped, “I may be 40, but I still know how to party.”

Photo: FilmMagic via Getty Images

Moss and Co. Go Out To Lunch

-------

Kate Moss & Jamie Hince If this is 40, things are looking pretty good—at least for Kate Moss. The iconic supe feted her fourth decade today with a swanky luncheon at London’s 34 restaurant. With wrapped presents in hand, the likes of John Galliano, Stella McCartney, Mario Testino, and husband Jamie Hince came out to dine or, perhaps, share a drink with the model. Not on the guest list? Console yourselves with our Moss birthday tribute gallery.

Photo: FilmMagic via Getty Images

i-D Ups Its Online Game

-------

i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch

Mario Testino Goes Back To His Roots

-------

Mario Testino's Alta Moda

In past interviews, Mario Testino has alluded that his childhood in Peru was that of a misfit. He was the fashion-crazed oddball in a traditional Catholic family, and by his early twenties, he had left his native Lima for London. So it would seem a touch ironic that Testino returned to Peru to shoot what are arguably some of the most fantastical fashions of his career. Alta Moda, on view at Manhattan’s Queen Sofia Spanish Institute, is the culmination of five years’ work photographing traditional costumes worn by the people of the mountain city of Cusco. All twenty-seven images on view are a window into a lush world rarely seen—particularly by Testino’s usual audiences. The opulent outfits were shot against a traditional painted backdrop from the archives of Martin Chambi, Peru’s seminal indigenous photographer. Below, Testino talks to Style.com about the couture-caliber costumes, his fascination with tradition, and the show’s notable departure from his usual oeuvre.

The name of the show is Alta Moda. What similarities did you see between these costumes and traditional haute couture?
I am known more for shooting a dress like a couture dress, so I thought the game of words was interesting: on one side it’s called Alta Moda because [the costumes com from] the highest region of Peru and “alta” means “high.” The other reason was because these dresses have been made with the same care and the same attention with which a couture dress is made, and it’s lasted for hundreds of years. They repeat the same tradition of embroidery, of the stitching, of the weaving, and couture is like that. There’s a parallel to it, so I thought it made a lot of sense to use that name.

In terms of a jumping-off point with the costumes you were shooting, was it more of an aesthetic connection initially, or a cultural connection?
I think it is a mixture of cultural and aesthetic. This is something I have always been interested in. When you look at my career, in a funny way, I’ve always been doing things related to tradition. I do the royal families, I go to Seville for the holy week and the fair of Seville, when all Sevillians go out into the streets dressed in flamenco dresses, on their horses. I’ve done the same thing with the Catholic church. I did a little exhibition called Disciples, and I went to Rome and photographed all the bishops and the cardinals dressed in their costumes. So the whole resurgence of costumes is something that has always fascinated me, and I’m always being drawn back to it. I guess it’s a mixture between culture and beauty, and aesthetics.

Mario Testino Alta ModaAs someone who doesn’t do many exhibitions, what made you want to show these images?

I opened a cultural institute in Peru called MATE, and I have to come up with exhibitions for them constantly. That’s what originally made me do this exhibition, because I thought it would be interesting for Peruvians to see something they have that maybe they don’t look at normally. It’s like everything: when you have it down your doorstep, you don’t look at it, and maybe you take it for granted. I went to do a job for British Vogue in this region, Cusco, which is the highest in Peru. The thing that brought me to discover this archive of treasures was that I asked for some costumes for some of my fashion pictures for the magazine, and when I saw the whole collection, I thought, “I have to document this.”

You used archival backdrops from the collection of Martin Chambi. What was your intention in doing that? Was it an homage?
I was very influenced when I saw an exhibition at the Photographers’ Gallery in London of Martin Chambi in the early eighties, because being Peruvian, I didn’t know about this work, and when I discovered it, I was quite surprised, really, that somebody had documented so well a region that we were all a bit ignorant about. When I arrived in England, I taught myself everything about Europe by looking at photographers like Cecil Beaton, or August Sander, who documented their society, their country, their history, and when I saw this exhibition of Martin Chambi, his portraits were particularly amazing in front of these backdrops. But the thing that caught my attention the most was going to Peru and finding these costumes, it reminded me that I had seen once a picture of Irving Penn’s, from when he had gone to Peru and photographed children against these backdrops. I thought it was an interesting way to bring all the photos together, and to really concentrate on the clothes. Continue Reading “Mario Testino Goes Back To His Roots” »

Mario Testino Takes to Instagram

-------

Mario Testino has photographed everyone from Joan Smalls and Gisele Bündchen to Jay Z and Jennifer Lawrence—plus, he’s lensed countless covers and editorials, for everyone (and we mean everyone) from V Magazine to Vanity Fair. The legendary Peruvian photographer was not, however, on Instagram—until now, that is. We well know that if there’s any place to leak behind-the-scenes footage, it’s on the Internet. And with his esteemed roster of collaborators, who knows what filtered finds Testino’s account might bring. Needless to say, he deserves a “Follow.”