Style.com

August 1 2014

styledotcom Tim Blanks throws back to Alexander McQueen's Fall Spring '97 La Poupée collection: stylem.ag/1zzBQx9 @SCENE pic.twitter.com/yKupiwUNYz

Subscribe to Style Magazine
9 posts tagged "Mark Lee"

Master Class

-------

It might have been a balmy after-work Friday evening, but an impressive fashion lot made their way to Washington Square to preview Helmut Lang’s latest show, titled simply Helmut Lang: Sculptures. The power players in the room, including Barneys’ Mark Lee, Ed Filipowski, and Cecilia Dean, were a testament to the designer-turned-artist’s lasting draw. “It’s really a confirmation of Helmut’s style,” said Giambattista Valli, who was in town for the Met gala and was taking in the rubber, foam, sheepskin, and tar stacked sculptures—modern totems of a sort (pictured). Valli, who has never met Lang, admitted he had long been an admirer. “He came into fashion and completely changed the aesthetic,” he said. “It went from the over-the-top eighties to his own clean and spare aesthetic. If you look around, his aesthetic continues to today.”

Lang’s forward-thinking, stark work contrasted particularly nicely with the classic parlor-floor town house space, including vintage moldings. The viewing venue came courtesy of art veteran Mark Fletcher, who co-curated the exhibit with Neville Wakefield. “It’s not easy to make the transition from fashion to art,” Fletcher said. “But when Helmut shredded his fashion archive, I thought ‘This guy is really serious.’ ” Fletcher was also quick to point out, though, that those with vision shouldn’t be restricted. “People like to keep people in specific arenas, whether it’s art, music, film, or fashion,” he said. “But transgressing cultural boundaries is what’s interesting. Look at Tom Ford.”

Helmut Lang: Sculptures, 24 Washington Square North, is on view until June 15.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Around The World With Maiyet

-------

“We literally sat in the back of some man’s house and workshop in Kenya, with Silly Putty, making molds to show the artisans how to make this bracelet,” Maiyet president Kristy Caylor (pictured, right) told Style.com last night at the brand’s fête to celebrate its exclusive launch at Barneys. As she held up a sleek gold cuff, she explained, “The first time the bracelet came back, it looked nothing like this. The second time, it looked nothing like this. By the third time it was close, and by the fourth time it was beautiful. They came out with this huge smile on their faces when they knew they had finally achieved what we had asked for.”

Caylor, along with the brand’s co-founder Paul van Zyl (pictured, left) and creative director Gabriella Zanzani, shared similarly endearing stories about the making of Maiyet and their partnership with artisans in South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, India, and more throughout the dinner portion of the night. Among those seated at the Fred’s feast, prepared by chef Floyd Cardoz, was Christina Ricci (pictured, center), this year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee, Princess Khaliya Aga Khan, and Barneys’ Mark Lee. “I wish I had known who she [Gbowee] was in the elevator—I had no idea I was in the presence of greatness,” one female guest said as she sat down to the table.

Nearby, Ricci, who was dressed in head-to-toe Maiyet, told Style.com, “At first, I just looked at the designs and thought they were beautiful, and then hearing the concept behind the whole company, I thought it was really amazing.” Meanwhile, at the other end of the lucite table, wine glasses were breaking left and right as they fell into the water-filled moat running down the middle. “It’s still early in the night and people are already throwing glasses around,” joked van Zyl. “Well, as long as Lori Goldstein is OK, the evening can proceed,” he told the group as he looked at Goldstein, who was sitting directly to his right. Though Ricci had to head out after a few bites of her banana leaf-wrapped halibut (early-morning rehearsals for her off-Broadway performance in A Midsummer Night’s Dream called), the rest of the guests continued on through the Indian vanilla bean kulfi (well, assuming they didn’t lose their dessert silverware to the moat).

Photo: Joe Schildhorn / BFAnyc.com

Brooks Departs From Barneys

-------

Amanda Brooks, who joined Barneys New York early last year, has resigned from her post as the retailer’s vice president and fashion director. She has announced she will be moving to England with her family: “I have had the pleasure of working with an incredibly talented team but have resigned to temporarily relocate to England with my husband [Christopher Brooks] and children in the interest of further pursuing other opportunities. It is a personal decision and I will miss working with the Barneys team,” Brooks tells WWD.

Brooks, who was previously at William Morris Endeavor Entertainment as director of fashion, was brought onto the Barneys team as part of CEO Mark Lee’s overhaul of the creative leadership for the retailer. WWD reports that the Barneys is not planning to replace Brooks immediately.

Photo: David X. Prutting / BFAnyc.com

Barneys Goes “Backstage” For Its Ads,
And Big For Its Renovations

-------


Barneys New York’s Spring ad campaign, the first under CEO Mark Lee’s tenure, breaks in The New York Times this Sunday. Dubbed “Backstage,” it was shot at the Spring fashion shows in New York, Milan, and Paris by the likes of Nan Goldin (who shot at the Balmain show, above), William Klein (who shot at the Lanvin show, below), and Juergen Teller. “We were seeing tons of black and white in the collections, and we thought, let’s build on that,” Lee said of the black-and-white imagery at a breakfast this morning. (The ads will also feature QR codes, which, when scanned by camera phones, will take users directly to the pictured looks on the stores Web site.) Also on the agenda at Fred’s: the changes he’s implemented since he started September 1 and his plans for the retailer’s future. The goal, said Lee, “is to ensure that Barneys remains the greatest specialty store in the world: special, surprising, different, dynamic. We’re never going to say, ‘It’s done.’ “

Sharp observers will have noticed that the awnings on Madison Avenue are now black to match the store’s iconic shopping bags. And speaking of windows, Barneys.com is getting a new microsite: “The Window” launches next week and will update daily with editorial content like designer interviews; Olivier Theyskens, Carven’s Guillaume Henry, and Frédéric Malle are among the talents up first. Eventually the site will get a complete redesign. There are changes in the works inside the store, as well. Prada clothes and handbags have left the building. (Gasping Miuccia-philes, take note: You’ll still be able to get the label’s women’s shoes and menswear.) The spaces that they occupied are currently being renovated for Azzedine Alaïa (it’ll be his biggest space in the U.S.) and Valextra, respectively. By November of this year, Lee said, the men’s Co-Op will move from the fifth floor to the eighth, and the men’s and women’s Co-Ops will be connected. Eventually, every floor that can be structurally connected will be. Lee was joined at Fred’s by his staff: chief merchant Daniella Vitale, creative director Dennis Freedman, and executive vice president and general merchandise manager Tom Kalendarian. Amanda Brooks, who was named women’s fashion director last week, starts Monday. Asked if the store would retain its “taste, luxury, humor” tagline, Lee said, “taste, yes; luxury, yes; humor? I prefer wit. Barneys was at its best when it was witty.” Continue Reading “Barneys Goes “Backstage” For Its Ads,
And Big For Its Renovations” »