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4 posts tagged "Marlene Dietrich"

White Tie: A Very Serious Matter



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Marlene Dietrich Remember last year’s Met ball, when guests took some fairly questionable liberties with their punk ensembles? A few, like Kate Upton, just ignored the subject altogether. (“I don’t think I fully understood the theme,” she told us while standing on the red carpet in an emerald DVF column gown.) Well, there will be no sartorial messing around during Monday’s Charles James: Beyond Fashion gala—at least not where the men are concerned—because the Anna Wintour-imposed “white tie and decorations” dress code is a deeply serious one. “There is no leeway,” men’s fashion expert G. Bruce Boyer told WWD when asked about white tie. “If you say full evening dress, there isn’t any interpretation.” Apparently, this all-important outfit is causing quite a stir among the male guests.

The look, reserved for only the most formal of occasions, comprises a black or midnight blue tailcoat; matching trousers with a strip of satin or a braid down the side seams; a stiff, white pique wing collared shirt; a white vest; white cuff links and studs; white or gray gloves; black stockings; and black patent shoes. A top hat is technically optional (but let’s be serious, it’s not really). Unsurprisingly, these duds don’t come cheap, and will run Gala-goers up to $10,000 for a custom Savile Row iteration.

While some feel the style is overly elaborate and dated, it actually seems pretty straightforward to me. And personally, I’m more concerned with what the women will be wearing. I sincerely hope we won’t see too many starlets in ill-conceived plays on James’ masterful ball gowns. My secret dream, though, is that some brave femme will upstage the gents in her own white-tie suit—à la Marlene Dietrich. Does anyone know if Madonna’s coming this year?

Photo: Getty Images 

Punctuation Meets Punk At Roger Vivier

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Tartan Virgule shoe

Long before there was the red sole, there was the “comma” shoe—also known as Roger Vivier’s Virgule. Launched in 1963, the shoe, famous for its curved heel, is the stuff of fashion lore. Last week, a major Vivier retrospective opened at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Virgule etc.…In the footsteps of Roger Vivier, and yup, the shoe earned top billing out of the immense body of work from the man who considered himself an architect and an inventor first, and a shoemaker by happenstance. Vivier and his Virgule’s world tour stops in London tomorrow at Selfridges Shoe Galleries—the largest shoe department in the world and an undisputed mecca for shoe lovers. It is here where the house will open its first shop in an event hosted by Inès de la Fressange, current creative consultant for Vivier, and designer Bruno Frisoni. It is all part of an international expansion of the brand, which has already seen shops opened this year in Japan and China.

The Vivier house has deep roots in Britain. In 1953, its namesake designer created the royal shoes for HM Queen Elizabeth II’s Coronation. After that, he shoed the Duchess of Windsor—not to mention his laundry list of iconic non-British patrons, like Marlene Dietrich, Elizabeth Taylor, Jeanne Moreau, and Brigitte Bardot. Today, the house’s fan base is made up of the “elegant” types—Cate Blanchett, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, Anne Hathaway, Nicole Kidman—but that doesn’t mean the label can’t have a rebellious edge. For tomorrow’s Selfridges launch, the Virgule will be reissued in a punk-tinged tartan; the updated classic debuts exclusively above. Later that night at Le Baron, a party hosted by pop progeny Atlanta Cadenet-Taylor will introduce a new generation of fans to Vivier’s work, though one wonders if his shoes have ever danced to strains of EDM. In any event, it shows that the house isn’t just living on past glory—it’s looking ahead.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Liya Kebede Hits The Big Screen, Marion Cotillard Stars In The New Lady Dior Campaign, And More…

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Model Liya Kebede is in a new French children’s film, Sur La Piste du Marsupilami (On the Trail of Marsupilami), based upon a Belgian comic book series. In the film, which debuted in Paris last night (officially opening April 4), Kebede plays the beautiful Queen Paya. [Telegraph]

For its first time ever, Tumi has joined forces with an outside designer, Dror Benshetrit, for an ongoing collection. The first round includes 11 pieces ($195 to $895) and hits stores nationwide April 1. [WWD]

Rizzoli is releasing a new tome, entitled Stars in Dior ($65), about the French house’s famous wearers. The book, due out in France in May and in the U.S. in September, includes images of Charlize Theron, Marilyn Monroe, and Marlene Dietrich. [The Hollywood Reporter]

In other Dior news, Marion Cotillard is the face of Dior’s new Lady Dior campaign. In the Peter Lindbergh-lensed ads, due out next month, the actress is carrying one of the label’s crocodile and raffia handbags. [Grazia Daily]

A Film From David Lynch, Bags From Lindsay Lohan, A New Name At Aquascutum, And More…

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David Lynch’s film for Dior, Lady Blue Shanghai, screened at the label’s cruise collection show. If you missed it there and want to see Marion Cotillard fretting (pictured), having a spectral love affair, and reciting a poem, the full 16-minute video is now up at LadyDior.com.

Following the departure of Graeme Fidler and Michael Herz for Bally earlier this year, Aquascutum has tapped English designer Joanna Sykes for its creative director post. Sykes is an alum of Armani, Ferretti, and Matches’ house label. [Vogue U.K.]

March of the mannequins: Industry stalwart Ralph Pucci will create a “catwalk” of his mannequins in Times Square, outfitted by Calvin Klein, DVF, Michael Kors, and more. Great, just what Times Square needs: more people standing stock-still, blocking pedestrian walkways. [WWD]

Lindsay Lohan is expanding her 6126 collection into handbags, apparently La Lohan’s favorite accessory. Style groups include Starlette, Glam A-Go-Go, and Kitten with a Whip. PR executives of the world: Isn’t there one of you out there who can convince her that these names are just not a good idea? [WWD]

And now we know: The tux R&B singer Janelle Monáe often sports is a tribute both to Marlene Dietrich and to her mother (a janitor) and her father (who drove a garbage truck). “It pays homage to how they put on a uniform every day and turned something into nothing.” [NY Mag]

Photo: David Lynch/Courtesy of Dior