Style.com

July 30 2014

styledotcom These are the designers you need to know now: stylem.ag/1zqTVxs pic.twitter.com/tZrYnR7kG3

Subscribe to Style Magazine
7 posts tagged "Mazdack Rassi"

Grads Show Promise at the Annual Parsons Fashion Show

-------

Parsons

“You never leave Parsons,” Simon Collins said from his perch onstage at Wednesday’s fourth annual Parsons Fashion Show. His statement rang true, because yesterday’s show was just as much about the Parsons family as it was about showing off the graduating seniors’ final collections. Editors, photographers, and an endless wave of students crowded into the school’s state-of-the-art University Center at 63 Fifth Avenue, where Milk Studios’ Mazdack Rassi and Parsons alum Chris Benz spoke about their experiences with the school, the importance of having a point of view, and how the brand-new facilities are far superior to the “dump” Parsons used to occupy in Midtown. A series of videos also played in between mini fashion shows, with cameos from Donna Karan, Anna Sui, and Style.com’s Dirk Standen.

“Parsons is all about collaborating,” Collins said. He was referring to the school’s own collaborations, which range from an Allen Edmonds capsule collection to the Parsons/Kering “Empowering Imagination” Competition, which is featured on Style.com this week. “If you’re a brand or you work for a brand, you know you can’t really guarantee being on the homepage of Style.com,” Collins said. “But Parsons can.” You could tell that these BFA students are born collaborators, too. They showed a firm grasp of the current market, sending out boxy coats à la Proenza Schouler; layered knits that called to mind Burberry’s Fall ’14 show; and even Fendi-inspired luxe fur accents, like those on Wenqi Wu’s covetable sheared tunic. We would wear those pieces tomorrow. Each student had a defined point of view—Ximon Lee cites the clothes of Russian street children as his starting point—but at the same time, the show felt cohesive. Not an easy feat. These students spent four years (or more) playing off of each others’ ideas and aesthetics to finish with a range of high-quality, very impressive final projects. You could picture them being an asset to any design team—although many dream of becoming the next Marc Jacobs, Jason Wu, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez, or Anna Sui, all Parsons alums who are still very connected to the school. Following the students’ upcoming graduation, we can see why they won’t want to leave the clan.

Photo: Courtesy of Parsons the New School for Design 

Required Reading: Parsons The New School for Design Releases Its First Book

-------

Mazdack Rassi, Simon CollinsNostalgic Parsons designers rubbed elbows among alumni old and new at Milk Studios last night in celebration of the design school’s first book. One would think that all those featured in The School of Fashion: 30 Parsons Designers were star pupils, but Anna Sui wasn’t one of them. Inside the crowded room, the designer confessed to her less-than-scholarly ways. “Being 18 and living in New York City with no parental guidance, I wasn’t a good student,” confessed Sui. But it was a fun time, she admitted.

Working her way around the room, Behnaz Sarafpour correctly named all of the designers whose sketches hung along the walls—including her own, drawn on a cocktail napkin. Sarafpour later reunited with fellow alum Reed Krakoff who, like her, once interned with Narciso Rodriguez. The two stood in front of a wall of black-and-white portraits opposite Proust questionnaires that asked designers Alexander Wang, Derek Lam, and Jason Wu the following: “What fictional character do you most identify with?” and “Who are your heroes in real life?” For Chris Benz, who was in attendance, the answers included Tom Sawyer and Martha Stewart, respectively.

“When I realized there hadn’t been a book written, I figured it’d be crazy not to,” said Simon Collins, the school’s dean of fashion, who hosted the event along with Milk’s Mazdack Rassi. The new tome includes thirty designer-dedicated chapters with a host of vibrant illustrations, photographs, and introspective quotes taken from exclusive interviews conducted over the past year. Part of the proceeds from sales will benefit scholarships for Parsons students.

While upping the school’s fashion cred ranks high on Collins’ to-do list, the dean was quick to boast that crafting the book was good for all involved. “I mean, the designers loved it,” offered Collins. “They can show their mums.”

The School of Fashion: 30 Parsons Designers is published by Assouline. Available at select bookstores or online at assouline.com.

Photo: Lola Haze/BFAnyc.com 

Exclusive: Made Fashion Week Announces Its Fall ’14 Lineup

-------

Jenné Lombardo, Mazdack Rassi, and Keith Baptista

Since Jenné Lombardo, Mazdack Rassi, and Keith Baptista launched Made fashion week in 2009, the program has helped such stars as Altuzarra, Suno, and Hood by Air gain their footing. And while Lincoln Center’s Fall ’14 schedule is thinning, Made’s lineup is robust as ever. Of course, there’s that little fact that the latter picks up the designers’ venue, production, hair, and makeup tabs. But on cool factor alone, if you’re an independent or emerging talent, the initiative’s Milk Studios and Standard Hotel spaces are inarguably the hottest spots to show. Today, Style.com can exclusively reveal Made’s Fall ’14 schedule, and it’s packed with exciting newbies like Azede Jean-Pierre, Charles Harbison, CG by Chris Gelinas (who won the second annual Made for Peroni Young Designer Award), Maria ke Fisherman, Baja East, Highland, and more. “There are a few things that are important to us,” offered Lombardo of the competitive selection process. “There’s obviously the talent side—we want to share beautiful talent with editors and buyers. We also want to make sure that [our designers] have a sense of business, because we invest a lot of money and time into this program,” she said. “We want to ensure that we’re investing in brands that are going to be successful—maybe not even financially, but that are going to at least make an impact on culture.”

Also on the docket for Fall is Australian designer Dion Lee‘s debut Made romp (he showed in New York for the first time last season at Eyebeam Studios in Chelsea), as well as CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award-winning label Public School. After presenting with Made for the past few seasons, the brand’s designers, Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne, will be holding their first bona fide runway show. “Every season I’m excited because I get to see the evolution of these designers’ collections,” said Lombardo. “We really get involved with their processes. The designers know that we’re humans—we’re not just an organization—and that they can always talk to somebody from the Made team.”

Just in case there was any doubt about Made’s cachet, Lombardo told us that the T-shirts for the MFW’s Fall ’14 Parsons interns were designed and donated by artists Daniel Arsham and Chris Stamp. “They’re really great-looking, and they’d be really expensive,” Lombardo chirped. “It’s stuff like this that’s exciting for us—we get people who are part of our culture approaching us and wanting to participate. If we weren’t who we were, we’d have to beg people for stuff like this. It’s just kind of cool.”

Have a read through all twenty-eight designers on Made’s Fall ’14 schedule, below.

MADE FASHION WEEK FALL ’14

Thursday, February 6
Houghton
Costello Tagliapietra
Chromat
Dion Lee Continue Reading “Exclusive: Made Fashion Week Announces Its Fall ’14 Lineup” »

Made Gives Us More To “Like”

-------

Made Fashion Week (originally MAC & Milk) held what could be regarded as a “breakfast of champions” yesterday at Milk Gallery, where bloggers gathered for the unveiling of an innovative mobile app that broadcasts runway images in real time, with available features that make it easy to “like” an individual look, take notes, or e-mail or tweet it, all while the model is walking down the catwalk. “With this app, there’s no more need to hurriedly scribble notes on pen and paper,” Mazdack Rassi, creative director of Milk Group and co-founder of Made, told Style.com as we tested out the app using iPads and smart phones to a video projection of a fashion show.

The downloadable app uses Sonic Notify’s technology to match each image to soundless audio signals that will work exclusively during the Made shows and presentations (taking place at Milk Studios and the Standard Hotel), which include Alexander Wang, Proenza Schouler, Erin Fetherston, Peter Som, and Patrick Ervell. This also means that if you happen to be stuck in a taxi and are unable to attend the show, you can launch the app via the Livestream video broadcast of each show, which syncs to the Made Fashion Week app. Fashion week just got a little bit easier.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Do-Gooding In Technicolor

-------

Art and design go hand in hand with fashion, so no surprise to find plenty of style-world names on the invitation to next week’s Museum of Arts & Design gala and auction. Waris Ahluwalia, Tyson Beckford, and Mazdack Rassi (founder and creative director of Milk Studios) are a few of the evening’s co-chairs, and Mandy Coon, Kevork Kiledjian, Kate Lanphear, and Robert Geller all among the host committee members. This year is the Fluorescent Ball, where all things eye-popping are in, from the artworks in the silent auction (like a neon-bright surfboard by Rogan Gregory to Dan Flavin-esque fluorescent-tube art pieces by Julian Lwin, Tapp Francke, and Lite Brite Neon) to the dress code for the night.

Also lighting up the scene: the just-announced celebrity co-chair of the evening, Community and Mad Men actress Alison Brie (left, with an appropriately fluoro-clad Estelle, at Diane von Furstenberg’s Spring ’11 show). Arts education—the beneficiary of the gala’s proceeds—is close to Brie’s heart. “I’ve always been a fan of arts education—my mother works in education, and that’s always been a big priority in my family,” Brie told Style.com from the set of Five-Year Engagement, the romantic comedy she’s filming with Emily Blunt. (Plus, of course: “Tyson Beckford’s gonna be there so you know it’s going to be a fun time.”) As for her fluorescent outfit for the evening? “The dress I was thinking of wearing is a Lela Rose bright orange one. Her use of color is fantastic,” she says, describing the shade as “neon-ish.” “I’ve definitely been to some neon after-hours parties in L.A. where I’ve really gone all-out. I don’t know if I’m going to go quite as…uh, whimsical.”

For tickets and more information, visit www.thefluorescentball.com.

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com