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July 29 2014

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7 posts tagged "Meadham Kirchoff"

Insta-Gratification: #LFW Edition

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #LFW. See below for today’s picks

Tuesday, February 18

Bad girls’ club.

Casual.

Behind the veil at Meadham Kirchhoff.

Tony the Tiger takes on the tote.

Next stop? Milano, baby. #itsmilanobaby Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #LFW Edition” »

LVMH Fashion Prize Finalists Announced

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Suno, Craig Green, Hood by Air

Back in November, we broke the news of LVMH’s new 300,000-euro LVMH Prize for Young Designers. According to WWD, 1,211 talents applied, and today the short list of thirty semifinalists, who will go on to present their collections to an esteemed panel of experts during Paris fashion week, were announced. CG by Chris Gelinas, Tim Coppens, Suno by Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis, Shayne Oliver’s Hood by Air, and Creatures of the Wind by Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters are among the New York-based brands that made the cut. Notable international names include London’s Craig Green, Simone Rocha, Thomas Tait, Meadham Kirchhoff (designed by Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchhoff), and Marques’Almeida (designed by Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida); Paris’ Jacquemus (by Simon Porte Jacquemus) and Atto (by Julien Dossena); Rome’s Stella Jean; and more.

Following the Paris presentations, judges will select ten hopefuls from the group of thirty, and these finalists will continue on to compete for the big prize. The decision, which will be made by a group including Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Humberto Leon, Carol Lim, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, will be announced in May.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com 

Throwing Some Shade

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Spring's Wild Sunglasses

Is it us, or do sunglasses just keep getting freakier? Thanks to a bevy of designers this Spring ’14 season, it appears that statement making will soon trump solar protection—but for results this OTT, we’re willing to endure a bit of a glare.

In New York, Jeremy Scott offered cat-eyes striped in “We’re experiencing technical difficulties” color-blocks. Prabal Gurung put his own spin on vibrant cat-eye shades, trimming them with asymmetrical shapes. Over in London, Meadham Kirchhoff showed a gilded, bat-wing pair—part The Matrix, part baroque Transylvania. Meanwhile, the XL shields that hid models’ peepers at KTZ could very well double as ski goggles. Across the Channel were, perhaps, the cheekiest iterations of all: Jean-Charles de Castelbajac sent hilarious pursed-lip specs and frames shaped to read “Glamour” down his Paris runway. No doubt, the look-at-me street-style set will be optically satiated come spring.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Pinkie Toes

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Pink shoes from Saint Laurent, Walter Van Beirendonck, and Meadham KirchhoffPerhaps it was The Great Gatsby‘s influence, but there was a lot of pink on the Spring ’14 menswear catwalks. However, while Jay Gatsby favored rosebud three-piece suits, designers this season employed the hue for their footwear.

In London, Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchhoff showed Crayola-pink rain boots in their eponymous collection. The boys added some of their signature kitsch by printing grinning Cheshire cat-like faces on the toes. Similarly, Tom Ford paired one of his bright, slim, dandyish looks with magenta tiger-striped slippers.

Further down the circuit, Raf Simons used pink banding across boots at his own label, while Hedi Slimane whipped up pointy-toed rockabilly booties in Barbie blush at Saint Laurent. Antwerpen provocateur Walter Van Beirendonck rounds out the bunch, having embellished his folk-inspired wingtips with roseate phalli. The kicks lent new credence to the term “foot fetish.”

Photos: Yannis Vlamos/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Saint Laurent); Filippo Fior/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Walter Van Beirendonck); Courtesy of Meadham Kirchhoff

We See Through You

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Sheer looks from Meadham Kirchhoff, Sass & Bide, Christopher Shannon, and 3.1 Phillip Lim

Sheers were regulars on the trend circuit long before Beyoncé appeared at the 2012 Met Gala wearing a diaphanous Givenchy gown. The look’s staying power comes from its versatility. “Unlike other fabrics,” explained fashion consultant Yasmin Sewell, “a single layer allows a designer to explore possibilities in depth and illusion.”

A quiet translucence has taken effect on the womenswear front. Sass & Bide (above, center) showed a Resort ’14 collection with long, sheer panels over simple skirts. Vera Wang traded minimalism for romance by piling on the sheer layers. In one instance, a delicate dot-pattern shift appeared underneath another shift embroidered with matte paillettes. Known for his cool and straightforward aesthetic, Phillip Lim (above, right) produced sheer shorts in white and blue for his latest play-while-you-work collection.

When it came to sheers in menswear, London-based designers were among the first to experiment. The various incarnations were far more structured, referencing traditional tailoring. Meadham Kirchhoff (above, left) offered a lineup of translucent jackets crafted from yellow-tinged and cloudy green rubber. Benjamin Kirchhoff denied any sort of deeper meaning in its use, but he did confess to being moved by the fabric’s texture. Christopher Shannon (above, center) went so far as to wet sheer nylon in an effort to capture an out-all-night-clubbing vibe. “I’d never want it to look too soft, so we used some really fine nylons as layers this season,” Shannon told Style.com. “It’s something that felt modern and sporty but had fluidity.”

Photos: Courtesy of Meadham Kirchhoff; Courtesy of Sass & Bide; Filippo Fior/ InDigital/ GoRunway (Christopher Shannon); Courtesy of 3.1 Phillip Lim