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July 22 2014

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3 posts tagged "Michael Avedon"

Lottie Moss Follows in Her Sister’s Footsteps as the New Face of Calvin Klein

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lottie-mossNothing comes between Calvin Klein and the Moss clan. Kate Moss famously posed for the label’s ad campaigns, alongside Mark Wahlberg, back in the nineties. Now her younger sister Lottie Moss is taking a turn as the face of the iconic American sportswear label. For its new Re-Issue Project with MyTheresa, Calvin Klein Jeans asked the 16-year-old to sport updated versions of its nine most classic pieces. The campaign was lensed by photographer Michael Avedon, who is also a legacy with the brand—his grandfather Richard Avedon photographed Brooke Shields for CK.

The capsule incudes original high-waisted skinny jeans and tapered jeans (popularized by none other than Kate), as well as denim jackets and shirts. The collection launches on MyTheresa on July 16, with prices ranging from $105 to $415. Here, a first look at the campaign.

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Photos: Courtesy of Calvin Klein Jeans x MyTheresa / Michael Avedon

Versace and the Haas Brothers Strike Gold

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Nikolai Haas and Simon Haas

“I was shaking,” said Simon Haas of the first time he met Donatella Versace. Clearly, he and brother Nikolai have gotten over their initial nerves, because last night at Versace’s Soho store, the designers celebrated their second capsule for the house. Displayed in all its gilded glory, the range of homewares and fashion objects (available starting today) was no doubt worthy of the Versace name. A golden honeycomb and Medusa iPhone cover was a hit among guests (the brothers made matching compact mirrors, cigarette cases, and lighter holders, too), and the black and gold shackle cuffs, clutches, and belts; Medusa-pendant chains; and clever tie clips looked as though they could walk down Donatella’s runway. On the objet d’ art front, there were leopard statuettes in exotic colors, and rounding out the offering was an assortment of printed T-shirts covered in a mélange of Versace iconography. “The [black and gold] one was actually just the cover of our presentation,” said Simon, “but Donatella loved it so much that she told us it had to be a T-shirt. She’s the most supportive, visionary person ever.”

After the cocktail party, the likes of Waris Ahluwalia, Michael Avedon, Patrick Li, and Maria Cornejo headed to the Mercer Kitchen for an intimate dinner. And considering guests are always late to fashion fetes, it was somewhat surprising that nearly all the invitees turned up promptly at 8:30. “Of course, everyone’s on time,” said Cornejo, laughing, who just returned from an emotional trip to her native Chile. “They’re on time because there’s food!”

Photo: Getty Images

Fashion’s Latest Emissary From The Fountain of Youth

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Dairy InstertStyle.com contributing editor and party reporter Darrell Hartman circles the city and, occasionally, the globe in the line of duty. In a regular column, he reports on the topics—whatever they may be at whatever given moment—that are stirring the social set.

Carlos Souza and Dorian Grinspan“Yes, the lad was premature,” goes a line from The Picture of Dorian Gray. “He was gathering his harvest while it was yet spring.”

I doubt I’m the first person who has, upon meeting Dorian Grinspan, thought of Oscar Wilde’s fable about precious youth. This Dorian is real. The 20-year-old founder and editor Out of Order magazine, he’s been sowing his seeds early—and some of the fashion world’s biggest influencers are taking notice.

Grinspan was born in Paris and came to the U.S. to study at Yale. But while an earlier generation might’ve chosen to wait for a diploma before launching into the world, Grinspan didn’t see the point. “I didn’t come [to the U.S.] wanting to do a magazine. I arrived at Yale and I was really, really bored,” he told Women’s Wear Daily. [Full disclosure: this reporter spent four years at Yale, and did not find it boring.] Grinspan will start his senior year in the Fall, majoring in American Studies, but he recently took an apartment in New York, and says that thanks to some Franco-esque schedule jiggering will be spending just three days a week in New Haven.

Youth these days! Grinspan is already a darling of the industry. WWD is only one of several publications to anoint him an up-and-comer, and his biannual is already carried by the likes of Opening Ceremony and Colette, and the second issue, which Grinspan launched last week, boasts the sort of top-shelf contributors of which many start-up outlets dream. Among the photo credits and profile subjects are Larry Clark, Ryan McGinley, and Olivier Theyskens. These are gets worth bragging about, even if Grinspan is modest, or at least PR-savvy, enough not to. “It’s actually funny to see how accessible these people are and how much they want to help,” he told me at last week’s launch party at Fivestory, an uptown boutique. (His fashion-model looks—literally, as in repped by DNA—aren’t the reason, but surely they can’t hurt.) Gus Van Sant, he added, had been “really interested, and we almost shot something,” but the scheduling hadn’t worked out.

Grinspan has plenty more influential supporters, including fellow editors. “Stephen Gan has been amazing to me,” he said. And after meeting Stefano Tonchi at a party in Cannes last year, Grinspan appeared in W this spring. Starting in the fall, he said, he’ll be writing for the magazine’s website. Quick work. For a moment, Grinspan did pay some dues—as an intern for Carine Roitfeld. Among the people met while working there was photographer Michael Avedon, who shot a story for the new issue. (Avedon is just a year older than Grinspan, and the great-grandson of Richard.)

Grinspan holds himself well—and tends to do so in the right company. Cynthia Rowley, who hosted an after-party of sorts for the magazine at her boutique-cum-sweet-shop, Curious, couldn’t exactly remember how she’d first met him. She was pretty sure his boyfriend had interned at her husband’s gallery. In any case, Rowley said, she’d gotten to know him through “the Brant kids.”

How has Grinspan done it, in an industry with fewer and fewer footholds for young talent? “I don’t think there’s a secret. I feel like everything is so circumstantial,” he explained. When pressed, he added, “Both my mom and my dad have a lot of connections in fashion, I guess.” His mother, a graphic designer, got him interested in clothes and style early on. His father, a lawyer, worked “for a long time” with BCBG. And there’s his godmother, Numéro editor–in-chief Babette Djian. “She’s been great,” Grinspan admits. “We go to fashion shows together if we both have an invite. But I would never call her up and say, ‘Please take me to Jean Paul Gaultier!’ That’s not what I want our relationship to be.”

If things keep going the way they’re going, the occasional missing invite won’t be an issue. And why shouldn’t they? Grinspan has a way about him, evident in the manner in which he politely escorted Clark up the stairs at Rowley’s party and posed with him for photos. Clark, like Rowley, couldn’t recall how he and Grinspan had first started talking, but he did remember meeting Grinspan face to face. “He’s very enthusiastic, but not overbearing at all—just a nice young man,” he said. And one more likely to make a splash than all the others.