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August 31 2014

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3 posts tagged "Michael Nevin"

The Jane Hotel Loses A Glass

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There was magic in the air at the Jane Hotel last night, as David Blaine and Juergen Teller teamed up to toast the new issue of The Journal. The hosts—and Journal contributors—were joined by Michael Nevin, founder and editor of the Brooklyn-based pub; Carlos Quirarte and Matt Kliegman, who had a hand in planning the event; and Nate Lowman, who was intermittently deejaying. Lowman wasn’t the only art scenester to swing by—Urs Fischer (right, with Teller) popped in, as did Gavin Brown. And model/photographer Christina Kruse showed up, too, fresh off her appearance on the Alexander Wang catwalk on Saturday and just ahead of debuting her new video at the Threeasfour show tonight.

Noting the crowd building around Blaine, Nevin explained that the illusionist does magic almost obsessively. “I’m sure that’s what’s going on,” Nevin said. “I had him and Juergen over for dinner last night, and he was showing us tricks half the time.” Sure enough, Blaine had his pack of cards out and was wowing a circle of party guests with his maneuvers. At one point, he capped off a trick by grabbing a girl’s cocktail, downing it, and then eating the glass. We’re not sure if that counts as magic, but it was something to see. Without watching, exactly. “Is that blood?” the girl asked, aghast. “Probably,” Blaine said, chewing. For his part, Nevin demurred when asked if he knew any magic tricks. “Making magazines,” he deadpanned. “That’s the only one.”

Photo: Marc Dimov / Patrick McMullan

The Secret To The Creative Life? A Diet Rich In (Pumping) Iron

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Everyone is in Paris or L.A. right now—except, of course, for everyone who isn’t. And pretty much everyone in the latter category turned up to the Bowery Hotel on Friday night to celebrate the new issue of The Journal. Chloë Sevigny, Chrissie Miller, Nate Lowman, Glenn O’Brien—all still in Manhattan! So are Smile guys Carlos Quirarte and Matt Kliegman, who hosted the fête, and so is Journal founder/editor Michael Nevin (pictured, center, with O’Brien, Gina Nanni, and Mary Nevin), who admits that intercontinental travel would probably put a crimp in his workout routine. “That’s how Terry and I bonded, actually—we both go to the same gym, and we’re both kind of obsessed with it,” Nevin explained at the party, speaking of lensman Terry Richardson, whose work appears in the new issue. “The gym seems like the most un-inspiring place in the world,” Nevin added, “but lately it seems to be the place I get all my inspiration. There’s something about the routine, or working your muscles. It sends fresh blood to brain, I guess.”

Photo: Carrie Schatz/PatrickMcMullan.com

In Conversation With The Journal‘s Michael Nevin

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When Michael Nevin launched The Journal ten years ago, the magazine was a skinny black-and-white zine dedicated to all things skate and snowboard. A decade later, the issue of The Journal that comes out tomorrow comprises, among other features, new work by Jonathan Meese in memorial to Dash Snow, semi-destroyed photographs of Kate Moss and Mario Sorrenti taken from photographer Glen Luchford’s archives, a lengthy interview with Walter Pfeiffer, and a supplement dedicated to William Eggleston. The Journal is glossy now, and hard-bound, and printed in color; there’s a gallery in Williamsburg attached to it, too. Contributions from the likes of Juergen Teller, Helmut Lang, Mark Gonzales, and Miranda July fill The Journal archives. Not bad for a magazine first stapled together at a highway-side Kinko’s in New England by a kid who was all of 19. Now, more transformations are afoot. The tenth anniversary issue of The Journal is physically larger than the previous one, it’s been given an engaging redesign by Peter Miles, and it includes the magazine’s first-ever fashion spread, starring Jamie Bochert. And yet, for all that, The Journal has changed less than it might appear. “The magazine has always been—and I hope will always be—an honest reflection of my interests,” explains Nevin. “It’s just that those interests have shifted over time.” Here, Nevin talks to Style.com about dialing up the Internet, cold-calling art stars, and texting Rodarte.

This is going to sound like a snotty question, but—why launch a magazine? This is the digital age, or hadn’t you heard?
When I first started The Journal, “online” wasn’t really a thing yet. I mean, I can remember signing up for my first e-mail account after I published the first issue of The Journal. I just wasn’t looking for the things that interested me on the Web. At the time, I was looking at magazines. Really looking—I mean, I grew up in Vermont, and there weren’t too many progressive publications around, so I’d have to work to cobble together bits and pieces of what interested me from the mainstream stuff I had access to. I’d spend hours in the bookstore, poring over magazines. And there was nothing out there covering this whole creative universe that derives from skateboarding and snowboarding. I wanted to read about that, and having just come off a year entering pro contests as a snowboarder, I felt like starting a magazine was a way to continue being a part of something I’d loved.

In other words, magazine-ness—print—runs deep in you.
Yeah, it does. But for reasons that are more than sentimental. I think they’re more than sentimental, anyway. I love the printed image, I love being able to open up the magazine and flip through the pages, I love being able to give a copy to somebody, I love seeing it in stores. I love what it represents. It’s essentially my curation in those pages, and to send the magazine overseas, and know that what I’ve worked on is being looked at, in the same material way, is really fantastic.

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