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5 posts tagged "Michele Lamy"

Byronesque.com Brings Its Vintage Treasures Offline

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Byronesque.com//Offline

Last year, Gill Linton launched Byronesque.com, a comprehensive Web site that, backed by Andrew Rosen and the late Marvin Traub, offers high-end vintage wares and sharp editorials. The online platform boasts a veritable treasure trove of rare, authenticated vintage designs, like an azure Jean Paul Gaultier frock, an asymmetrical Yohji Yamamoto dress, and a bevy of Thierry Mugler and Alaïa. And while it all looks spectacular in one’s browser, Linton felt she should create an IRL experience with the digital destination’s best stock.

Enter the site’s first brick-and-mortar venture, Byronesque.com//Offline, an exhibition and boutique housed in the dilapidated annex of the James A. Farley Post Office in New York City. Offline is complete with video installations, melancholic wall art by Craig Ward, and a vault of approximately forty impeccably dressed mannequins. Yesterday evening, insiders gathered to fete the project, which was punctuated with a live Polaroid photography session by the inimitable Michèle Lamy. “It’s difficult to [decide] what is mainstream or not…but being here feels real, and what they are trying to do is very important,” Lamy said of the site.

Byronesque.com//Offline

“There’s so much potential in vintage fashion,” said Linton. “It’s made better, there’s a story behind it, and there’s a history behind it. The way I merchandise the store is through storytelling—there’s a curve of Vivienne Westwood from Pirate to Seditionaries, for example—but it’s not that it has to be a linear progression. It’s about the energy of stuff.”

The stuff on display includes a 1984 John Galliano men’s kimono coat from his graduate Central Saint Martins collection, Les Incroyables (not for sale); a burlap Alexander McQueen look from F/W ’02; a 1986 Azzedine Alaïa leather zip dress; and a Katharine Hamnett allover marijuana-leaf-print bodysuit.

Glenn O’Brien lent his support by co-hosting the affair. “Everybody mixes vintage in,” he said, “I can’t tell you how long I’ve had this Kilgour, French, & Stanbury coat; it must be twenty years since I bought it at Barneys. Vintage is kind of where the next ideas come from. You can be a step ahead by wearing something that’s so out that it’s just about ready to come back.”

Byronesque.com//Offline will open to the public on December 12 and run through the 15th. Located at the James A. Farley Post Office on Eighth Avenue at West 31st Street, the show will be open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Photos: Courtesy Photos/div>

Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered

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Michele Lamy

“These were some of the first shoes Rick ever made when he was in Hollywood,” said Michele Lamy at the opening of Show and Tell: Calder Jewelry and Mobiles last night. Lamy—the wife and muse of Rick Owens—was referring to a pair of sky-high, heelless black platforms that she wore while effortlessly climbing the spiral staircase of Salon94‘s uptown gallery. Lamy had come into town from Paris to style the exhibition, which showcased the oft-overlooked crowns, earrings, necklaces, and cuffs (most of which are for sale through Salon94) crafted by twentieth-century sculptor and painter Alexander Calder. “I screamed when I first saw the jewelry,” professed Lamy during our interview, pulling her tattoo- and ring-covered fingers to the chest of her Comme des Garçons vest. She flashed a smile, exposing her gold and diamond teeth. “I’m such a fan of his.”

In addition to styling models for the event, Lamy enlisted artist Matthew Stone to snap Polaroids (with Andy Warhol’s camera, no less) of guests donning Calder’s creations. Furthermore, she’s working with artist Youssef Nabil on a Calder-centric photo series, which will star such characters as Debbie Harry, Cindy Sherman, Björk, Joni Mitchell, and Cher.

Although Lamy is most frequently associated with Owens, whom she met in her forties, she’s led an enthralling and utterly eccentric existence all her own. “It’s like she’s had ten lives,” said artist Carson McColl, who flew in from London for the fete with his boyfriend, Gareth Pugh. Considering she’s spent time as a cabaret dancer, an L.A. club kid, a fashion designer, a law-school student, and a stripper, he was hardly exaggerating. Here, Lamy talks to Style.com about Rick Owens’ Spring show, Calder’s work, and her taste in jewelry.

This exhibition celebrates an artist who also made jewelry. Do you think that jewelry and fashion are art?
That’s always the question! Some think art is unique pieces, and the Calder pieces are unique. If you do your own piece, it could be art. It’s very difficult to know the difference. Calder’s pieces were made by hand, and I think that makes it art. Clothing is more difficult because you have to produce more of it.

Do you think what you and Rick create is art?
I hope our life is.

Are your and Rick’s creative visions always in line? Do they ever differ?
They differ, but he always wins. If you don’t have the same aesthetic values, it’s difficult to live with somebody. If you don’t have the same political ideas or whatever, it’s fine. But if somebody says, “Oh, I like this,” you have to know what it is and feel the same way. Because he’s the designer, he’s the one at the front, and then I’m navigating. He’s the captain, but I’m pushing him.

You’re the current.
Yes.

I recently interviewed Nicola Formichetti, and he said that Rick’s Spring show “changed everything” and that he and the other designers who watched it “were all jealous of his genius.” What is your reaction to that, and how did you feel about the show?
It was extraordinary to come [to the States] after the show, because it was around Halloween and there were people who went dressed as Rick Owens steppers! I told him immediately that this was a statement. The show was such a burst of joy and emotion. Those girls rehearsed themselves. It’s what they do, and all their hearts were in it. It was a burst of humanité, générosité, and loving, and everything was fantastic. Rick said that it was so real that he’s not going to try to top this show…of course, we’ll see. You know, in New York there was a discussion about [race on the runway], and then [people said] that Rick did this show and it was the answer. But it was just a spontaneous gesture—wanting to express how you feel about yourself to the world. Continue Reading “Michele Lamy: Adorned and Unfiltered” »

Rick Owens Has It All, Except a Rock-Crystal Toilet

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In the latest issue of WSJ. magazine, Style.com/Print star Rick Owens gives Lynn Yaeger a tour of his unorthodox home on Paris’ Place du Palais Bourbon. Having lain empty for twenty years before Owens and wife, Michèle Lamy, moved in, in 2004, the building, which doubles as an atelier, is the former French Socialist Party headquarters. An embodiment of the rough-hewn looks he sends down the runway, Owens’ abode is quintessentially Rick, complete with raw concrete floors, a wall fresco by his step-daughter Scarlett Rouge, a few pieces from his own furniture line, and a black boom box, which was a gift from Cher. When asked about his interior-design philosophy, Owens replied, “How do we make all things around us beautiful? Every switch plate, every sneaker, I want all the everyday stuff to be great. I would like a rock-crystal toilet!”

Photos: Francois Halard for WSJ

Rick Owens: The Vinyl Countdown

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Rick Owens creates worlds more than fashion. His shows are famous for their otherworldly ambience, from the mise-en-scène (from foam to fire to electrifying light shows) to the soundtrack. For his Fall ’12 women’s show, he played Zebra Katz’s then little-known “Ima Read.” A star was born.

For his follow-up, the Spring ’13 menswear show, Owens paired Matthew Stone, London’s music director-artist-provocateur of choice, with his own wife, Michèle Lamy, to record a track called “How Do You Feel” at the London studio David Bowie used for his early albums. He spun the track at the show, then sent it off to a handful of DJs—including Katz, Mister Tweeks (who mixed the soundtrack for his Spring ’13 women’s show), and Richelle (who will do music for the next men’s outing)—to remix. “This is all about fanboy worship,” Owens says. “I’ve been listening to music from all of these guys for a while, and having Michèle and Matthew do my runway music for the last Spring show gave me the perfect excuse to do something with them all. I was tickled pink with the results.”

“The entire project was just pure indulgence,” the designer explains, and so the results—pressed on vinyl (printed with an Owens shot of Lamy, taken on a deserted island near Venice) and whipped digitally into MP3—are available gratis while they last at Owens’ flagship stores. Says Rick: “First come, first served.”

Photo: Thomas Iannaccone

Diana Vreeland Lights Up Paris Once More

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There are few people who could warrant a breakfast of Champagne and caviar, but Diana Vreeland is one of them. Yesterday, in collaboration with Barneys, Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s (pictured, center) film about her legendary grandmother-in-law, Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has To Travel, made its Paris debut. And given the editor’s relationship with the city (she was born here, after all), it was a significant screening, with the likes of Grace Coddington, L’Wren Scott, Michele Lamy, Olivier Rousteing (pictured, right), and Patrick Demarchelier all turning out to Paris’ Pagoda Theater for the event. “Mrs. Vreeland was such a dramatic personage that if anybody was cinematic, it’s her,” said Valerie Steele, who was seeing the film for the first time. “She totally worshiped Paris and the whole world of Paris fashion. I think she would be delighted to be here. And for all we know, maybe she is.”

Mrs. Vreeland’s presence was felt. “I remember when she was the editor of Vogue in the sixties, she moved the entire offices to adjoining suites at Le Crillon,” Vreeland’s grandson Alex recalled. “They took out all the beds and it looked like something from a James Bond movie because you’d open the door and see all these women running around or typing letters.” After the film had ended, viewers were given red gift boxes cleverly filled with peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and a bottle of scotch. The editor notoriously enjoyed the unorthodox combination for lunch every day. The box also contained a notecard with one of Vreeland’s most famous quotes: “Fashion must be the most intoxicating release from the banality of the world.” Certainly, her words provided a poignant reminder at the end of a very long, albeit intoxicating, fashion month.

Photo: Courtesy Photo