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July 30 2014

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5 posts tagged "Michelle Dockery"

Runway to Red Carpet: Summer Motifs and Bright Whites

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062114_Runway_To_Red_Carpet_blogStars were in a sunny state of mind this week, with highlights consisting of summery motifs and fresh hues. Kiernan Shipka set the tone in a pale pink peplum Marni dress with jeweled embellishments at the Much Music Video Awards in Toronto on Sunday.

Gowns on Thursday’s Critics’ Choice Television Awards red carpet were literal interpretations of the summertime theme. Lizzy Caplan stepped out in Valentino’s Pre-Fall ’14 gown decked with colorful butterflies, while Diane Kruger chose a floral Elie Saab Spring ’14 Haute Couture number. Chloë Grace Moretz went for a less obvious form of florals, donning a black-and-white frock printed with a wire-frame digital 3-D image of a flower from Christopher Kane’s Resort ’14 science-inspired lineup at Coach’s summer party on Tuesday in New York.

Fresh summer white also seemed to be a theme this week, with several notables choosing the color for a variety of events. Michelle Dockery selected a plunging Antonio Berardi sheath for the Cartier Queen’s Cup polo final in Windsor, U.K., while recent French Open champ Maria Sharapova opted for a croc-stamped, double-breasted sheath from Antonio Berardi’s Spring ’14 runway for the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party in London. Natalie Portman also went for the trend, choosing a silk number with a cotton basque from Dior’s latest Resort ’15 runway for the Miss Dior exhibition opening in Shanghai.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: George Pimentel / WireImage

Hollywood’s A-list Stylists Get a Moment in the Spotlight

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Elle FanningNow that awards season is over and all of the prestigious statues have been doled out, the unsung heroes behind the stars can get some shine of their own. At Soho House in Los Angeles yesterday, The Hollywood Reporter hosted a lunch celebrating its annual Power Stylists issue.

Topping the list of honorees are Elizabeth Stewart, who dressed Cate Blanchett, Sandra Bullock, and Julia Roberts for their countless appearances; Petra Flannery, the mastermind behind Amy Adams’ American Hustle promotional parade; and newbie Micaela Erlanger, who is featured on the cover of the issue alongside clients Michelle Dockery and Lupita Nyong’o.

“It’s really exciting to know that you can have this kind of impact, that you can help shape and coif someone’s image and brand and know that what you’re doing really is powerful beyond just picking out a pretty dress,” Erlanger enthused, calling her work with Nyong’o a true collaboration.

At the luncheon, stars and their stylists arrived in pairs: Olivia Munn with Erlanger, Ashley Greene with Cristina Ehrlich, and Bella Heathcote with Penny Lovell. After Jimmy Choo creative director Sandra Choi addressed guests, Hollywood Reporter writer Merle Ginsberg asked the actresses in the crowd what it felt like to be a plus one. Laughter ensued.

As Lizzy Caplan, stylist Tara Swennen, and Evan Rachel Wood all discussed awards season dressing, Elle Fanning broke down her kindred connection with stylist Samantha McMillen, who also styles her sister, Dakota. “I’m always texting her looks,” Fanning said, referring to the files of Style.com runway images she admits to keeping. And as was echoed by celebs and their stylists throughout the lunch, each look is a team effort. “The details are very important,” she said. “Samantha always makes sure to bring funny socks and things like that to make it me.”

Photos: Courtesy Photo

Eddy Anemian Wins the H&M Design Award

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Eddy Anemian's winning collection at the H&M Awards

The winner of the third annual H&M Design Award was unveiled today at Mercedes-Benz Stockholm Fashion Week. The initiative was founded to support and celebrate fashion at its earliest stages and provide mentorship for young designers. This year’s contestants, who represent thirty-two schools across Europe and America, competed for a 50,000 euro cash prize, the chance to develop a collection for H&M, and the opportunity to show their collection to an audience of international press and buyers. Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative head of design and a member of the jury, offered, “It is a very inspiring process to work with the Design Award. It’s a difficult decision for us, as we have such a strong start field with such great students. To choose just one of them was very hard. You really have to go with your gut and see who gives you the most wow factor.” The jury—also consisting of fashion designer Erdem Moralioglu, fashion editor of Vogue Italia Sara Maino, Downton Abbey actress Michelle Dockery, executive fashion editor of BritishVogue Serena Hood, H&M’s creative advisor Margareta van den Bosch, and style star Michelle Violy Harper—finally chose the 24-year-old Belgian talent Eddy Anemian from La Cambre in Brussels.

Titled, “They Can Cut All Flowers, They Cannot Keep Spring From Coming” Anemian’s collection was inspired by Tilda Swinton’s character in Luca Guadagnino’s film I Am Love, as well as the French painter Ingres. The range was made up of long strips of floral-print upholstery fabrics that were reconstructed and sewn together into elegant and fluid shapes. This was contrasted with waterproof fabrics cut in flounces to give the effect of marble and ceramics. The silhouettes, meanwhile, were elongated with a strong influence of couture. “I am very happy and very excited to be here, and also looking forward to working with H&M’s very professional team in how to develop my designs into garments for the H&M stores,” Anemian told Style.com post-presentation. “We have only started this process, but I think you will see some of the patterns, fabrics, and shapes translated and developed into new pieces.” We’ll be keeping an eye out for his H&M capsule, which is set to hit stores this fall.

Photo: Courtesy of H&M

Runway to Red Carpet: Stars Step It Up for Awards Season

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Sandra BullockWith the Golden Globes only three days away, Awards Season is officially here. And this week, we saw stars aplenty strutting down red carpets at various pre-Globe ceremonies. For instance, Golden Globe Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy, nominee Amy Adams stepped out in a black-and-white polka-dot Juan Carlos Obando Spring ’14 halter gown at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards gala on Saturday, where she and her American Hustle castmates were honored with the Ensemble Performance Award. Cate Blanchett, who is up for a Best Actress Globe in the Drama category, started the season off swinging by winning the Best Actress honor at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards on Monday. The Blue Jasmine star wore a silver brocade gown with a full high-low skirt and matching jacket from Antonio Berardi’s Pre-Fall ’14 lineup to accept her accolade. On Wednesday, many A-listers, including Gravity leading lady and Golden Globe nom Sandra Bullock, headed to the People’s Choice Awards. Bullock, the night’s big winner, stepped out in a green, white, and navy floral Peter Pilotto Resort ’14 frock, and accepted awards for Favorite Movie Actress, Favorite Comedic Movie Actress, Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress, and Favorite Movie Duo alongside Gravity costar George Clooney.

On Thursday evening, W magazine held a pre-Golden Globes fete in L.A., giving the “Best Performance” nominees a chance to celebrate before the big reveal. Best Supporting Actress nom Lupita Nyong’o attended the event in a black satin-back crepe Proenza Schouler dress from the Resort ’14 collection. Downton Abbey star Michelle Dockery made an appearance to celebrate her show’s nomination, turning up in a multichecked frock from Altuzarra’s fresh Pre-Fall ’14 range. With the nominees continually hitting it out of the sartorial ballpark, we can hardly wait to see what they have in store for the main event this weekend. Any predictions? Tune in Sunday night for our complete coverage of the 71st Annual Golden Globes.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: Gregg DeGuire / WireImage

Caroline McCall Talks Dressing Downton Abbey for the 1920s

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The Ladies of Downton Abbey

Who’s ready for a glam-packed trip back to 1922? This Sunday, Downton Abbey—the British series that explores the dramatic lives of the well-to-do Crawley family and their staff—returns for its fourth season on PBS. And as the cast of lords, ladies, cooks, maids, and butlers enters into the 1920s, they experience a bona fide fashion revolution. With the exception of Maggie Smith’s uppity character, Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham, the “upstairs” ladies begin to slip into the loose, beaded, embellished, and sometimes skin-baring designs of the pre-flapper age. Emmy Award-winning costume designer Caroline McCall is responsible for it all.

Many would argue that the elaborate period costumes worn by the show’s aristocratic characters, like the rebellious Lady Edith (who experiences somewhat of a coming of age this season), Lady Mary Crawley (who spends the entire season mourning the loss of her husband, Matthew, and thus exclusively wears frocks in mauve, black, and purple), Cora Crawley, and her mother, Martha Levinson, are one of the series’ biggest draws. “I think the romanticism and the glamour of the show attracts people,” offered McCall of Downton‘s international success. “Of course, the clothing helps with all that. The costumes help you understand who each character is, but would people still enjoy it without the costumes? I think they probably would.” Maybe so, but certainly not as much. Here, McCall talks to Style.com about how icons Jeanne Lanvin, Madeleine Vionnet, and Paul Poiret influenced Downton‘s looks, the perils of working with vintage clothes, and why she chose to dress Maggie Smith in the image of a queen.

Seeing as this season is set in the twenties, the characters are experiencing a fashion revolution. How are the new costumes different from what we’ve seen in the past?
Downton began in 1912, and now we’re in 1922 and 1923. In terms of fashion for women, that’s probably the most change we’ve seen in any single decade. It’s quite extraordinary to see the transformation from how covered-up women were, how uncomfortable and corseted they were, to how completely different they’re dressed in season four. I always tell the actresses that their characters would never have imagined in 1912 that they’d be able to go out like this. We’re not in the flapper period yet, but there are all sorts of designer influences going on in the early twenties. A lot of Lady Mary’s [played by Michelle Dockery] wardrobe is inspired by Vionnet. Lady Rose MacClare [played by Lily James] has a lot of knitwear because the argyle craze was beginning due to the fact that the Royals were starting to wear their knits in day-to-day life, instead of just for sport. Then there’s a lot of Lanvin-influenced dresses. And Edith [played by Laura Carmichael] has all sorts of influences, because of her being in London. She’s a journalist and she’s trying to be more sexy and womanly, so for her, I looked at lots of illustrations by George Barbier. Poiret has also been an influence throughout.

Lady EdithIt sounds like Lady Edith’s wardrobe changes pretty drastically this season.

Yes, it’s really the arc of her story. When you come back in series four, Matthew has been dead for six months, and it feels like the house hasn’t moved on. The whole house has been in darkness since his death, and Edith is desperate to get out. And when she returns to London, boy does she go for it. She’s decided that she’s a new, independent woman of the early twenties, so her wardrobe has changed to reflect all that.

Are any of the characters’ wardrobes inspired by historical figures?

Well, for Violet Crawley—she’s played by Maggie Smith—we looked a lot at Queen Alexandra and what she was wearing. She was the same age as Maggie Smith’s character in the same time period, and she was very glamorous. But she had a particular style. Queen Alexandra was an Edwardian woman, and her wardrobe and her silhouette remained as such during the twenties, but she still had a little pizzazz about her. That’s what I’ve tried to give Maggie. Alexandra always had stunning hats, and she always wore a high collar. Maggie’s silhouette has been more or less the same throughout the whole series—the fabrics and the trims have changed, but the silhouette of her clothing will not. However, a character like Martha Levinson [played by Shirley MacLaine] is desperate to keep up with fashion, even if she’s slightly older in years. She wants to stay young.

How important is historical accuracy when you’re designing these costumes? Do you take any liberties?
We try to create something that’s as true to the time as possible. There are looks this season that people will think are not right, they’ll think they’re ahead of their time, but they’re not. We do a lot of research—I look at books and magazines from the time, and I visit Cosprop, a costume house in London where they have a museum of original clothes. Going through original pieces helps me understand the way things were constructed and the differences, the little nuances, that changed from one year to the next. But obviously you can’t be slavish to the period because you can’t only use original clothes. The fabrics are too fragile. However, when we make new costumes, we make them as closely as possible to what they would have been. Continue Reading “Caroline McCall Talks Dressing Downton Abbey for the 1920s” »