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July 22 2014

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3 posts tagged "Mimi Xu"

Misty Rabbit Talks Spinning Fashion’s Soundtracks

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Misty Rabbit

There’s no shortage of deejays on the fashion scene, with your Misshapes and your Harleys and your Alexas and what have you. But Mimi Xu—who goes by the name of Misty Rabbit when she’s on the decks—has a particularly impressive knack for blending unexpected musical genres (think Berlin’s ambient electro mixed with classical jazz fading into a cool spin of disco-funk) into cohesive and oh-so-catchy sets. She’s an eager bunny, and knows just how to get the party going for the likes of Miu Miu, Prada, Fendi, Acne Studios, and too many others to name. This season, the Shanghai- and Copenhagen-raised but London-based sound designer is as busy as ever. She mixed the soundtracks for Yigal Azrouël, Catherine Malandrino, Tome, and Ostwald Helgason in New York, developed runway music for Topshop, Julien Macdonald, and Emilia Wickstead in London, and dropped a special Fall/Winter mix for Mytheresa.com just last week. Next up? A hotly anticipated party for Moncler’s Pharrell Williams collaboration in Paris this evening, and a personal design project, which will undoubtedly become the requisite accessory for music-loving cool girls come holiday season. Here, Xu talks to Style.com about her Mytheresa.com mix, the difference between playing parties and runways, and her favorite new artists.

You’ve done a lot of shows this season. How does deejaying a fashion show differ from deejaying a party?
Deejaying is about a spontaneous, fun, and playful way of sharing music. It’s about getting the party going. When you do a soundtrack, it’s very nerdy and unglamorous—you’re behind the scenes, you’re really working with the designer, and you’re creating something with the designer to really reflect his collection. It’s not about what I like. Of course, it’s about my influences and my take on music. But I’m there to showcase the collection. I love doing both, but they’re very different. Show soundtracks take a lot longer. It’s a much more technical process—it’s much more creative, and it’s more intellectual. And with soundtracks, everything’s set in stone previously. On the day of the catwalk, you don’t have to do anything besides cuing the show. But when you deejay, things never go to plan. Anything can happen on the dance floor. I can fill up the stage—who knows?

What have designers been asking you to play this season?
There are no specific trends this season. Each designer had their own inspirations. Musically, I went from Mississippi blues to Brazilian seventies experimental Tropicalia movement to psychedelic rave to classical theatrical to French electro. It’s a big range, so you need to be very erudite in your music knowledge. Designers need that.

What are you going to play for the Moncler-and-Pharrell Williams party?
I’ve been thinking today that we’re gonna do something quite hip-hop-y. But I don’t know! You can’t play Pharrell Williams tracks. I’d be embarrassed to play someone’s track when they’re in the room. So I’m not sure yet…. Obviously, I’m gonna have a lot of R&B and hip-hop, but it’s gonna go into disco and a few electronica-sounding tracks, too. I need to get people dancing, so I’ll see tonight how it will go. Continue Reading “Misty Rabbit Talks Spinning Fashion’s Soundtracks” »

Alexa Chung Goes Fan Girl for Mytheresa

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Alexa Chung

Judge a man by the company he keeps, and an e-tail boutique by the shoppers it attracts. That, at least, is the reigning logic at Mytheresa, which this week rolls out a new portrait series of its favorite fans. The collection of snaps begins with English clotheshorse Alexa Chung, who models her favorites of the site’s current wares, from Acne to Valentino. The portraits appear here, on Style.com, along with a look behind the scenes at Chung’s shoot, below. The series will continue in the coming weeks with camera-friendly faces such as Harper’s Bazaar‘s Laura Brown, who’s no stranger to the online video, as the host of Bazaar‘s The Look Web show, and London-based deejay Mimi Xu.

Continue Reading “Alexa Chung Goes Fan Girl for Mytheresa” »

H&M’s Got Other Stories To Tell

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H&M is on a roll these days. In quick succession, there was the recent Becks “bum double” drama (read: mega publicity), the Paris fashion week show, and, for the hat trick, there’s the launch of & Other Stories, the Swedish high-street giant’s new London concept store. Last night, H&M celebrated the opening of the 10,000-square-foot Regent Street space, which is filled with meticulously edited beauty products, jewelry, and fashion. The best part about the whole thing is the knowledge that you won’t have to walk away simpering with desire—even the tightest budgets can afford this stuff. Apart from their in-house designers, who clearly favor architectural shoes and sculpted silhouettes (very Scandi-chic, if we do say), the brand also introduced their “Co-Labs”—temporary collaborations with finger-on-the-pulse talents like The Lake and Stars, Clare Vivier, and Alyson Fox. In other words, the two-story behemoth is the A-to-Z for cool hunters on a budget.

Naturally, the ultrahip store needs some ultrahip ambassadors. “We invited a small group of people—including stylists, DJs, and editors whose style we admire—to our atelier in Stockholm and asked them to put together pieces from our collection,” said Samuel Fernström, who’s head of & Other Stories. Flying the flag last night were Portia Freeman, Valentine Fillol-Cordier, Bat for Lashes (Natasha Khan, left), DJ Misty Rabbit (Mimi Xu), Julia Sarr-Jamois, and Mary Charteris, whose self-styled wares (like an ocean-print suit, a sheer top, a pleat-front skirt, and more) can be seen in the online shop, which launches today. “We chose people who wear things that feel right to them,” added Fernström. Judging by how & Other Stories’ ladies looked at yesterday’s fete, job done.

& Other Stories is located at 256-258 Regent Street in London.

Photo: Courtesy of H&M