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April 19 2014

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5 posts tagged "Miranda July"

You’ve Got Mail From Miranda July

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Miranda JulyWriter, filmmaker, and performance artist Miranda July has never shied away from inviting the public into her world. Childhood injuries, sexual proclivities, insecurities about aging—no detail or eccentricity is off limits. Oftentimes, July encourages the audience to take part in the (over?)-exposure. For instance, her seven-year Web project, “Learning to Love You More,” culminated with more than 8,000 people submitting responses to online assignments like: “Take a picture of your parents kissing.”

In fact, much of July’s work hinges on interrogating the outer limits of breaking down the boundaries between “me” and “you,” and what it means to be close to someone in the Internet era. Her latest work, “We Think Alone,” adds a new angle to the intimacy project. Here, she invites such friends as Lena Dunham and Sheila Heti, as well as newfound acquaintances Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Lee Smolin, among others, to contribute a series of their personal e-mails to be read—without context—by whoever would like to receive them each week.

“I made a list of 20 different kinds of e-mails— an e-mail about money, an angry e-mail, one to your mom. Then I sent the list to 10 different notable people whom I admire,” explained July of her process. “I was quite nervous—just asking people to do it seemed sort of presumptuous—but the first person to send hers to me, the artist Catherine Opie, sent all 20 at once and filled me with confidence. It was a lot more nuanced than I had imagined.” Continue Reading “You’ve Got Mail From Miranda July” »

Band Of Beginners

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“There’s death, it’s not all gumdrops and rainbows, but I walked out of the movie theater in this perfectly melancholy state,” Band of Outsiders creative director Scott Sternberg says of Beginners, the new film by his friend Mike Mills, starring Ewan McGregor, Christopher Plummer, and Mélanie Laurent. Sternberg hosted a screening of the new flick in Los Angeles last night, for pals like Miranda July and Liz Goldwyn, the first of what he hopes will be many Band movie nights to come. Next week in New York, Opening Ceremony will oblige with an East Coast screening, too.

Beginners is based in part on Mills’ life; McGregor, Mills says, plays a character who “shares some things with me: We both do graphic design, we both often figure out what we’re thinking by drawing, we both have dogs, and we both did record covers for a very real band named The Sads.” (They also both also wear a lot of Band of Outsiders. Sternberg provided the character’s wardrobe for the film.) In Beginners, McGregor’s character, Oliver, finds love just as his world is rocked by his father’s announcement that he is gay and has terminal cancer. “It’s really a life-affirming movie—it’s about how you start over and how do you forget your bad habits,” Sternberg tells Style.com.

Mills, for his part, is no beginner. He’s directed music videos for Blonde Redhead and Sonic Youth, lensed the previous feature film Thumbsucker with Tilda Swinton and Keanu Reeves, created the brand identity for Kim Gordon’s much-loved fashion line X-Girl, and developed textile designs for Marc Jacobs. In addition to the movie, he’s also releasing a book, Drawings From the Film Beginners, of his illustrations (which appear as the work of “Oliver” in the film), launching next week at Opening Ceremony.

Photos: Courtesy of Band of Outsiders

Good Or Bad, They’re Bringing Sexy Back

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Nobody forgets their first time. But not everybody feels compelled to recall it in print. Credit where credit’s due, then, to the contributors to the latest issue of Dossier, Skye Parrott and Katherine Krause’s glossy biannual, which rounded up a cast of characters—from Alexis Bittar and Cynthia Rowley to Miranda July and arty nouveau-pornographer Richard Kern—to muse, in pictures and text, on their first forays in the bedroom. (One brave soul even conducted a phone interview with his deflowerer, who estimated that they’d last spoken their junior year of college.) Was anything too raw to see the light of day? “We have a policy of printing everything we like,” Parrott said with a laugh at the packed launch party last night, which drew Rogan Gregory, Monique Péan, Timo Weiland, and Suno’s Max Osterweis to the New Museum.

Cobbled together in updated-zine style—with help from Buero’s Alex Wiederin, the magazine’s recently appointed creative consultant, who co-founded Another Magazine and revamped Ten and Vogue Hommes International—it’s a testament of sorts to letting it all hang out. And letting it all hang out is exactly what Andrej Pejic does in an editorial shot by Collier Schorr (who, Parrott says, is planning to use some of the images in an upcoming show). The androgynous beauty, shot in various states of undress, is in good company among the magazine’s cover girls. The previous issues have featured Freja Beha Erichsen and Daria Werbowy, and while the three aren’t the strangest of bedfellows, Pejic is definitely a departure of sorts. “We had Freja and Daria,” Parrott said of the decision. “As far as models go, how could you go bigger than that?” As any of the issue’s contributors could tell you, there’s a first time for everything.

Photo: Courtesy of Dossier

This Twin Is One of a Kind

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Even in this era of media shutterings, there’s a magazine—to update the old saying—born every minute. But Twin, which launches in London this week, hopes to stand out from the crowd. “With the instant communication of blogs and the Web,” says features editor Aimée Farrell, Twin “feels a little more simple, considered, and less throwaway. It’s an object to keep and covet.” Top three reasons to get your hands on the hardcover biannual’s premiere issue:

• Editorial pedigree: Farrell works by day at British Vogue (and by night as a founding member of the Voguettes, the title’s roving DJ squad); editor in chief Becky Smith was the founder and former creative director of the cult mag Lula; and art editor Francesca Gavin does double duty at Dazed & Confused and Elle U.K.

• Boldface contribs: The debut issue features articles by Miranda July, Garance Doré, and poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy, and fashion spreads by Dazed alumnae Mari Sarai and Carlotta Manaigo.

• Kim Noorda: The Dutch model has never looked lovelier than she does in this shoot by Ben Weller and stylist Naomi Miller. Lounging in bed reading Hemingway and spinning Neil Young records, she’s a laid-back apostle of Americana. www.twinfactory.co.uk.

Photo: Courtesy of TWIN

In Conversation With The Journal‘s Michael Nevin

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When Michael Nevin launched The Journal ten years ago, the magazine was a skinny black-and-white zine dedicated to all things skate and snowboard. A decade later, the issue of The Journal that comes out tomorrow comprises, among other features, new work by Jonathan Meese in memorial to Dash Snow, semi-destroyed photographs of Kate Moss and Mario Sorrenti taken from photographer Glen Luchford’s archives, a lengthy interview with Walter Pfeiffer, and a supplement dedicated to William Eggleston. The Journal is glossy now, and hard-bound, and printed in color; there’s a gallery in Williamsburg attached to it, too. Contributions from the likes of Juergen Teller, Helmut Lang, Mark Gonzales, and Miranda July fill The Journal archives. Not bad for a magazine first stapled together at a highway-side Kinko’s in New England by a kid who was all of 19. Now, more transformations are afoot. The tenth anniversary issue of The Journal is physically larger than the previous one, it’s been given an engaging redesign by Peter Miles, and it includes the magazine’s first-ever fashion spread, starring Jamie Bochert. And yet, for all that, The Journal has changed less than it might appear. “The magazine has always been—and I hope will always be—an honest reflection of my interests,” explains Nevin. “It’s just that those interests have shifted over time.” Here, Nevin talks to Style.com about dialing up the Internet, cold-calling art stars, and texting Rodarte.

This is going to sound like a snotty question, but—why launch a magazine? This is the digital age, or hadn’t you heard?
When I first started The Journal, “online” wasn’t really a thing yet. I mean, I can remember signing up for my first e-mail account after I published the first issue of The Journal. I just wasn’t looking for the things that interested me on the Web. At the time, I was looking at magazines. Really looking—I mean, I grew up in Vermont, and there weren’t too many progressive publications around, so I’d have to work to cobble together bits and pieces of what interested me from the mainstream stuff I had access to. I’d spend hours in the bookstore, poring over magazines. And there was nothing out there covering this whole creative universe that derives from skateboarding and snowboarding. I wanted to read about that, and having just come off a year entering pro contests as a snowboarder, I felt like starting a magazine was a way to continue being a part of something I’d loved.

In other words, magazine-ness—print—runs deep in you.
Yeah, it does. But for reasons that are more than sentimental. I think they’re more than sentimental, anyway. I love the printed image, I love being able to open up the magazine and flip through the pages, I love being able to give a copy to somebody, I love seeing it in stores. I love what it represents. It’s essentially my curation in those pages, and to send the magazine overseas, and know that what I’ve worked on is being looked at, in the same material way, is really fantastic.

Continue Reading “In Conversation With The Journal‘s Michael Nevin” »