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July 31 2014

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16 posts tagged "Moda Operandi"

Marina’s Must-Haves: Monogrammed Ancient Greek Sandals

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Ancient Greek

Simple sandals for the summer are a must, and Ancient Greek Sandals makes some of the best ones around. Whenever I’m at their showroom, I’m mesmerized by the variety of options. The collection is huge, and the simple kicks come in numerous styles and colors. You can see their entire collection here. For the beach, I’m investing in these slides in natural with my personal monogram, ML. The customization will be available on Moda Operandi starting June 1, so you can have your personal seal added, too. The best part? The initials are on the house.

Ancient Greek Sandals’ monogramed Thais, $240. Available for preorder on modaoperandi.com starting June 1.

Photo: Ancient Greek Sandals

Marco de Vincenzo Talks LVMH, Independence, and Commercial Success

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Marco de Vincenzo

Marco de Vincenzo: If you don’t know his name, you’d better learn it fast. The Italian up-and-comer, who has worked with Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi on the Fendi collection since 2000, recently secured financial backing from LVMH. LVMH has proven to be a strong supporter of fashion’s new guard—what with the creation its Young Fashion Designer Prize as well as its investment in Nicholas Kirkwood and J.W. Anderson—and bought a minority stake of De Vincenzo’s eponymous brand last month. Ever quick to the draw, Moda Operandi’s Indre Rockefeller has already scooped up the designer’s tactile, kaleidoscopic Fall ’14, and is offering it for pre-sale via an online trunk show, which runs through March 20. “I think he is an innovator,” Rockefeller told Style.com. “There are a number of designers who are doing beautiful things, but whenever I see Marco’s collections, it feels like he’s marching to the beat of his own drum,” she explained. “When you look at his use of color, texture, and print, it almost feels like he’s operating in another dimension. His Fall collection popped right off the runway, and for our purposes, it will pop right off the page as well.” That’s some high praise from a major retailer. “This was a very special season for me,” relayed De Vincenzo, who describes his woman as daring, classical, and hypnotic. “The timetable for a trunk show of this level is perfect because it’s so close to the show—the energy is still there,” he said of the Moda Operandi event. Here, De Vincenzo speaks with Style.com about LVMH, working with Silvia and Karl, and his plans for the future.

How has your role at Fendi influenced your design aesthetic? And what have you learned from Silvia and Karl?

When I started working at Fendi, I was a young boy. I owe all I know about this job to the opportunity I’ve had to observe and work with those two very important people—Silvia and Karl. I learned what it means to be free and to constantly want to reach my own goals and to create new ones. Working on bags together with Silvia gave me the opportunity to completely understand the balance that transforms a beautiful object into a big commercial success. I consider myself very lucky to have built my knowledge in such a context.

Did your role as a consultant at Fendi help facilitate LVMH’s investment in your brand?

Of course. Through Fendi, LVMH has had the time and opportunity to get to know me both as a creative and as a person. I love my job more than anything, and because of that, I dedicate most of my time to it. I believe that this dedication has been understood and appreciated.

Why did you feel it was the right move to sell a minority stake of your business to LVMH?

Being an independent designer is not easy. You can be noticed and arouse interest in people, but there’s a moment when you can’t satisfy what the fashion industry expects from season to season by yourself. You need to create and experiment, and you need money to do so. Furthermore, if you don’t have enough resources and a good team working with you, it’s hard to guarantee high quality concerning production and distribution. LVMH is giving me the possibility to grow.

Marco de Vincenzo

We’ve seen big fashion companies investing in several emerging and independent designers in the last couple of years. What are your thoughts on this? And how do you think it will affect the fashion industry and help it evolve?

I think that all this can facilitate a real generational turnover—not only via hiring talented designers to reshape established brands, but also by helping new names. It’s very natural to invest in the future of fashion because nothing lasts forever, and innovation is essential in every creative field.

What are your plans now that LVMH has invested?

From now on the game will become more serious. This does not mean that my last years of work were a game, but it’s true that more resources, together with a strong, pure, and creative vision, can make miracles. My business is becoming more definite.

Can you tell us about your aesthetic? What excites and inspires you?

I leave instinct to guide me without any limits. My aesthetic varies—it’s a harmony between very different themes. Optical illusions, kinetic art, and visual and tactile 3-D concepts are some of my starting points, together with the idea of being well dressed, and typically Italian.

What would you like to see change in the fashion industry?

Unfortunately, I know a lot of very talented designers who had to give up their projects because they were alone and were not accepted by the fashion industry. This must be avoided. A substantial project always needs a group of different [supporters and creatives] to be built. In my opinion, it’s very important to have a good team working together.

Photo: Getty Images; Courtesy of Moda Operandi

Lingerie in the Fast Lane

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Morgan Lane

Morgan Curtis spent several years as a painter and illustrator in addition to helping her mother, Jill Stuart, as an associate designer and all-around consultant. This season, however, she decided to branch out on her own with a lingerie line dubbed Morgan Lane. “My mom has always had a very feminine aesthetic that is often inspired by vintage lingerie, and that’s where I came to appreciate it. She started when she was so young and did everything all by herself. So I told her, ‘If you can do it, I can do it,’ and she’s been my biggest cheerleader,” Curtis told Style.com. She had previously been working on a series of oil paintings that referenced thirties Kewpie dolls and decided to incorporate those into her brand as a muse and mascot named Lanie, who appears on novelty pieces like satin panties, bloomers, an embroidered eye mask, and even the packaging. Curtis explained, “Lanie is kind of mischievous and a bit of a vixen. She’s named after my youngest sister, who’s always been a bit of a troublemaker. Featuring her helped keep things cute and playful instead of getting too dominatrix-y and over-the-top sexy.” These underpinnings may be sweet, but they still have plenty of allure. Highlights from the debut range include shapely mesh bras with hand-cut silk floral appliqués and matching knickers (a pair of high-waisted briefs with subtle side cutouts modernize a retro style), as well as versatile bodysuits and lacy sleepwear rompers. Every piece is carefully considered, down to details like silk-covered hooks and a flattering fit. “I found an amazing patternmaker who gets things right off the first sample,” Curtis said. “She has the same name as my grandma, which I thought was a good luck charm.”

Morgan Lane’s debut collection ($48 to $328) is currently sold at Matchesfashion.com and will be available beginning February 2014 on Modaoperandi.com.

Morgan Lane

Photos: Courtesy of Morgan Lane

Omoyemi Akerele Puts Nigerian Fashion In The Spotlight

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Omoyemi Akerele

Lagos, Nigeria—an oil-rich port city with an estimated population of 21 million people—is globally recognized as a fast-growing financial hub. However, it’s emerging as a cultural hotbed, too, with fashion at its forefront. Much of that is thanks to Omoyemi Akerele, founder of Style House Files—an on-site agency founded to “tirelessly position Lagos and Nigeria on the international fashion map.” In an exclusive interview, Akerele offered, “Nigerian fashion stands out. It tells a story of a diverse and dynamic culture, of historical references, and ultimately, commercial viability. It’s about trade, not aid.” Ahead of the city’s third annual Fashion and Design week, which begins on Wednesday, Akerele speaks to Style.com about the challenges facing local designers, the region’s immense untapped market, and what it means to not only advance but define Nigerian creativity as the country inches toward its remarkable potential.

How did you become Nigerian fashion’s mouthpiece?
My career in fashion started about eleven years ago, in styling and image consulting. Over time, I realized that there was room for a platform to act as a catalyst on the scene, to spearhead change and work toward positioning fashion as business in Nigeria—this is how Style House Files was born. We see our role as agents of change determined to make an impact, change the mind-set of people, and create opportunities where there might seem to be none.

Why might one think that opportunities aren’t present or viable?
Well, in a country with an estimated 150 to 160 million people, it surprises me to no end that no entrepreneur has seen the need to invest in a garment manufacturing company that can cater not just to fashion designers, but create opportunities for creating our own bigger retail brands in Nigeria. The traders and business scions in Aba—a local garment district in the southeast of the country—remain at the forefront of benefiting from this industry, but there’s got to be a re-engineering of people’s outlooks: for people to design and manufacture garments by us for our consumption. Continue Reading “Omoyemi Akerele Puts Nigerian Fashion In The Spotlight” »

Can Moda Operandi Fix Karlie’s Fashion Heartbreak?

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“It changed the way that I started dressing,” reveals Karlie Kloss. The supermodel du jour is referring to a Steven Meisel photograph from the nineties, featuring supes of yore in decade-appropriate matching Chanel tweed miniskirts, jackets, and hats. For Kloss, it was the look that “got away.”

Debuting exclusively above, The One That Got Away is a video series produced by online luxury retailer Moda Operandi, in partnership with St. Regis Hotels & Resorts, detailing fashion heartbreak—that one runway or editorial outfit that you just had to have but could never locate—and how the site can mend your sartorial melancholy.

In addition to the beauty from St. Louis, Moda Operandi has tapped an impressive roster of industry tastemakers to lend their own testimonials, including Anna Dello Russo, Caroline Issa, and Poppy Delevingne (you can also shop the ladies’ latest fashion obsessions). Although, for these women, we’d imagine that the coveted and the wait-listed are never too far out of reach.