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April 19 2014

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31 posts tagged "Moschino"

Kate Middleton: Fashion Maven or Bright Banana?

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kate middleton and prince williamContinuing her ongoing royal tour, Kate Middleton donned a vivid yellow Spring ’14 Roksanda Ilincic dress during an appearance at Sydney’s Royal Opera House today. While addressing a crowd, Middleton revealed that Prince William told her the dress makes her look like “a banana.” Poor form, Wills. A few days ago, he also reportedly criticized the Duchess’s emerald Erdem coat for being “too bright.” Considering that Prince William has basically worn a variation of the same tired navy-suit-and-red-tie ensemble every day throughout the tour, he should probably lay off. And seeing as Kate was recently dubbed “normcore,” I also think that, if only for the purpose of being cheeky (or even better, stylistically exciting), Kate should test the waters with a few wild getups. How about some Fall ’14 Moschino? Or, if she wanted to embrace the Brits, Meadham Kirchhoff’s latest looks would be a bold choice. Do it to it, Kate, and show the Prince who’s boss—sartorially speaking.

Photo: Getty Images 

Viva Moschino! The Chance to Buy a Piece of Fashion History

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Moschino at Decades

Hot on the heels of Jeremy Scott’s schismatic Moschino debut, the house is poised to clock some more time in the spotlight. L.A. vintage vanguard Decades recently snapped up more than two hundred iconic pieces from the private collection of Lynda Yost, a longtime devotee of the brand, all of which are up for grabs as of this morning. An exclusive first look at the offering debuts here. Decades co-owner Cameron Silver scored with Yost’s cache, which is exhaustive enough to turn many a museum curator emerald with envy. In fact, he dubs it, “The definitive Moschino collection on the planet.”

Long before Alexander Wang’s parental advisories, there were Franco Moschino’s designs, brimming over with logos and slogans, from the cheeky (“Better a happy hippie than a yukky yuppie”) to the more earnest (“Opposites must coexist!”). Yost, who was raised Amish, was first drawn to the fabled label thanks to a simple principle: Opposites attract. Moschino’s designs, equal parts kitsch and wit, were appealingly alien. Her first Moschino purchase? An appropriately exuberant pair of color-blocked harem pants. She’s also quick to note a curious 21st-century echo of that initial attraction. “I was interested in Jeremy Scott’s appointment because he’s also a farm boy, and there has just got to be something about the humor and the subtle tweaking of society that you’re not allowed to do when you’re a hardworking farm person.”

Moschnio at Decades

Yost and Silver are optimistic when it comes to Scott taking the reins, and about his potential when it comes to expanding the brand’s audience. “He is [appealing to] the right demographic, which is very young—younger than the old Moschino [catered to],” Yost says. “Moschino in his day would have made fun of Romeo Gigli and Chanel, and you had to be a fashionista to understand the humor. But with Jeremy making fun of McDonald’s, he’s speaking to a broader brushstroke audience and a younger one.” It’s a far cry from the industry’s lately more staid leanings (“normcore,” if you like). “I think we’ve lived in a long period of time where fashion has morphed away from fun and humorous, and Moschino always injected the frivolity into fashion,” Silver offers. It’s a noble mission, to bring the fun back to fashion, and both Yost and Silver are doing their part to make it as attainable as possible. As she puts it, “We’re very keen on the Moschino dictate, which is everybody should be fashionable. It isn’t just for the wealthy.” Items on offer range in price from a $25 pair of socks to a loftier $10,000 jacket. While Decades’ initial release is hardly scant, the duo hint that there may be more to come down the line. As Silver tells it, “Lynda has enough to dress an army!”

Photos: Courtesy Photos 

Louis Vuitton to Show Resort 2015 in Monaco

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Louis Vuitton

Style.com learned today that Louis Vuitton will be holding its first-ever cruise destination show for the Resort 2015 season. The far-flung locale of choice? Good old glamorous Monaco. The move is indicative of Vuitton’s newfound dedication to ready-to-wear following its appointment of creative director Nicolas Ghesquière, who debuted his first collection for the house earlier this month during Paris fashion week. More generally, this is also proof of the expanding role of runway shows.

Chanel, who’s previously presented its cruise and Metiers d’Art ranges in Versailles, Monaco, Singapore, Dallas, Scotland, and beyond, is headed to Dubai come May; Nicola Formichetti is hosting his first show for Diesel in Venice next month; and Dior jetted guests to Monaco (seeing a trend here?) for its Resort 2014 outing. Moschino, too, jumped on the destination bandwagon and premiered its Resort 2014 collection in Shanghai.

What does all this mean? While it’s no doubt lovely to be an editor at one of these exotic events, houses’ choice to raise their shows’ profiles by holding them in exciting locations proves these runway spectacles are more about advertising, brand image, and engaging the international public than ever before. Not to mention, we’re sensing a little competition between fashion’s heavy hitters. What’s next—catwalking on the moon?

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo/ Indigitalimages.com 

A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig

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Vanessa FriedmanChange is a’comin’. In the last six months, The New York Times’ key fashion critics and journalists—Eric Wilson, Cathy Horyn, and, most recently, Suzy Menkes—have departed the publication. (Wilson decamped to InStyle, Menkes is headed to International Vogue, and Horyn left for personal reasons.) But that’s not to say that the paper—which, thanks to Wilson’s wit, Horyn’s rapier pen, and Menkes’ learned insights, has offered up some of the most entertaining and informed fashion reporting of the last two decades—is losing its clout. Yesterday, the Times confirmed industry suspicions when it appointed Vanessa Friedman, formerly of the Financial Times, as its chief fashion critic and fashion director. Like her NYT predecessors, Friedman, who became the FT‘s first fashion editor in 2002, has a knack for not only critiquing fashion, but for helping us to understand it in a broader historical and cultural context. All one needs to do is read her recent takedown of Jeremy Scott’s first Moschino outing—which opened with the line, “Kiev was burning and in Milan, Jeremy Scott made his debut at Moschino with a series of bad jokes”—to understand what I’m talking about.

Friedman insists, however, that she is her own journalist—not Cathy Horyn, not Suzy Menkes—and when she dives into her new post next month, she plans to stick to her guns and honor her own voice, rather than focus on living up to the reputations of those who came before her. Here, Friedman speaks to Style.com about her new gig; the state of fashion criticism; and why, despite all the Internet’s white noise, readers still crave an expert opinion.

You were just hired for one of fashion journalism’s most prestigious positions. But why, in this day and age, is fashion criticism so important?
I think any kind of criticism is important, whether it’s fashion or another form of cultural analysis. And I think it always has been. There is a lot of talk about the rise of the blogger and social media and how everyone’s ability to become a critic has made formal critics less important. But I think what everyone is finding is that there is room for all sorts of opinions, some of them educated and some of them just literal. And I think the Times is an incredible platform to bring an educated, contextual, impersonal, analytical, historical, multicultural analysis to a forum, whether that’s books or music or movies or fashion.

Some say fashion critics aren’t always treated with the same respect as other reporters. Have you found that to be the case? Does fashion criticism deserve the same amount of respect as other forms of reporting?
Honestly, I haven’t found that to be the case. You know, I currently work at a highly financial-oriented newspaper, and I feel as legitimate and respected here as anybody. I think that if you treat your subject with seriousness and respect, other people tend to treat it the same way. The Times has a history of treating it that way, and I think that’s terrific. What’s interesting about fashion at the moment is that it has become a pervasive element in the general pop cultural conversation because of social media and the rise of visuals as a primary communication device. The first thing everyone talks about, whether they’re talking about film or music or presidents, is what they’re wearing. And that makes fashion a really interesting subject to look at, and one that’s relevant in a very broad context.

Given the power of advertisers these days, do you think it’s possible to be an unfettered critic? Do you feel you’re able to say what you want to say?
I’ve never, ever had an issue with this. It’s never crossed my mind and it’s never been something that’s been brought up to me. My feeling is that if you are a critic, what’s important is to be fair, and people respect that. They may not like it, but they are fine with it. And if you’re not willing to say when something is bad or a mistake, then when you say it’s good it means nothing.

What is your vision for the Times? Are you planning on changing anything?
I think it’s too early to say. I’m really excited to get to the newspaper—which isn’t going to happen for a couple of weeks—and meet everyone. Clearly, I’m a different person, a different writer than Cathy or Suzie or anyone else, so whatever I bring to the table is a specific point of view. But I think I’ll see when I get there.

In that same vein, how do you see yourself fitting into the team and the history of the New York Times in respect to Cathy? She had a reputation for being a spectacular—but often ruthless—critic. Do you aim to be the same?
No. I aim to be me. I would never aim to be the same as Cathy. She was terrific, and I have enormous respect for her and read everything she wrote. I loved sitting next to her at shows, I loved talking to her about lots of things—fashion and beyond. But we’re different people and we’re different writers. What I do will be different.

Your Moschino review was pretty sharp-tongued. What kind of response did you get to that piece?
Some people liked it, people agreed or disagreed. It was mostly via Twitter. I think Jeremy [Scott] tweeted his Facebook likes. But no one said anything, no one called me from Moschino and said, “How could you do that?” There was a reason I said what I said, it wasn’t just gratuitous, and hopefully I expressed that. I really look forward to seeing what he does next. Continue Reading “A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig” »

Vanessa Friedman Joins the New York Times as Fashion Director and Critic

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Vanessa FriedmanFollowing the departure of Cathy Horyn and Suzy Menkes, Vanessa Friedman, formerly the fashion editor of London’s Financial Times, is joining the New York Times as fashion director and chief fashion critic. She will begin at her new post next month.

Speculation among editors at last month’s shows was that Friedman had been lobbying hard for the Times position, and some even felt that it was no accident that her Moschino takedown in the FT had a certain Horyn-like vigor. Friedman has served as the FT‘s fashion editor since 2002. Prior to her role there, she was a regular contributor to such publications as The New Yorker and Vogue, and was the founding fashion and features director for InStyle UK. No doubt, she’ll make a strong addition to the evolving NY Times fashion team.

Photo: Getty Images