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34 posts tagged "Moschino"

Louis Vuitton to Show Resort 2015 in Monaco

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Louis Vuitton

Style.com learned today that Louis Vuitton will be holding its first-ever cruise destination show for the Resort 2015 season. The far-flung locale of choice? Good old glamorous Monaco. The move is indicative of Vuitton’s newfound dedication to ready-to-wear following its appointment of creative director Nicolas Ghesquière, who debuted his first collection for the house earlier this month during Paris fashion week. More generally, this is also proof of the expanding role of runway shows.

Chanel, who’s previously presented its cruise and Metiers d’Art ranges in Versailles, Monaco, Singapore, Dallas, Scotland, and beyond, is headed to Dubai come May; Nicola Formichetti is hosting his first show for Diesel in Venice next month; and Dior jetted guests to Monaco (seeing a trend here?) for its Resort 2014 outing. Moschino, too, jumped on the destination bandwagon and premiered its Resort 2014 collection in Shanghai.

What does all this mean? While it’s no doubt lovely to be an editor at one of these exotic events, houses’ choice to raise their shows’ profiles by holding them in exciting locations proves these runway spectacles are more about advertising, brand image, and engaging the international public than ever before. Not to mention, we’re sensing a little competition between fashion’s heavy hitters. What’s next—catwalking on the moon?

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo/ Indigitalimages.com 

A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig

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Vanessa FriedmanChange is a’comin’. In the last six months, The New York Times’ key fashion critics and journalists—Eric Wilson, Cathy Horyn, and, most recently, Suzy Menkes—have departed the publication. (Wilson decamped to InStyle, Menkes is headed to International Vogue, and Horyn left for personal reasons.) But that’s not to say that the paper—which, thanks to Wilson’s wit, Horyn’s rapier pen, and Menkes’ learned insights, has offered up some of the most entertaining and informed fashion reporting of the last two decades—is losing its clout. Yesterday, the Times confirmed industry suspicions when it appointed Vanessa Friedman, formerly of the Financial Times, as its chief fashion critic and fashion director. Like her NYT predecessors, Friedman, who became the FT‘s first fashion editor in 2002, has a knack for not only critiquing fashion, but for helping us to understand it in a broader historical and cultural context. All one needs to do is read her recent takedown of Jeremy Scott’s first Moschino outing—which opened with the line, “Kiev was burning and in Milan, Jeremy Scott made his debut at Moschino with a series of bad jokes”—to understand what I’m talking about.

Friedman insists, however, that she is her own journalist—not Cathy Horyn, not Suzy Menkes—and when she dives into her new post next month, she plans to stick to her guns and honor her own voice, rather than focus on living up to the reputations of those who came before her. Here, Friedman speaks to Style.com about her new gig; the state of fashion criticism; and why, despite all the Internet’s white noise, readers still crave an expert opinion.

You were just hired for one of fashion journalism’s most prestigious positions. But why, in this day and age, is fashion criticism so important?
I think any kind of criticism is important, whether it’s fashion or another form of cultural analysis. And I think it always has been. There is a lot of talk about the rise of the blogger and social media and how everyone’s ability to become a critic has made formal critics less important. But I think what everyone is finding is that there is room for all sorts of opinions, some of them educated and some of them just literal. And I think the Times is an incredible platform to bring an educated, contextual, impersonal, analytical, historical, multicultural analysis to a forum, whether that’s books or music or movies or fashion.

Some say fashion critics aren’t always treated with the same respect as other reporters. Have you found that to be the case? Does fashion criticism deserve the same amount of respect as other forms of reporting?
Honestly, I haven’t found that to be the case. You know, I currently work at a highly financial-oriented newspaper, and I feel as legitimate and respected here as anybody. I think that if you treat your subject with seriousness and respect, other people tend to treat it the same way. The Times has a history of treating it that way, and I think that’s terrific. What’s interesting about fashion at the moment is that it has become a pervasive element in the general pop cultural conversation because of social media and the rise of visuals as a primary communication device. The first thing everyone talks about, whether they’re talking about film or music or presidents, is what they’re wearing. And that makes fashion a really interesting subject to look at, and one that’s relevant in a very broad context.

Given the power of advertisers these days, do you think it’s possible to be an unfettered critic? Do you feel you’re able to say what you want to say?
I’ve never, ever had an issue with this. It’s never crossed my mind and it’s never been something that’s been brought up to me. My feeling is that if you are a critic, what’s important is to be fair, and people respect that. They may not like it, but they are fine with it. And if you’re not willing to say when something is bad or a mistake, then when you say it’s good it means nothing.

What is your vision for the Times? Are you planning on changing anything?
I think it’s too early to say. I’m really excited to get to the newspaper—which isn’t going to happen for a couple of weeks—and meet everyone. Clearly, I’m a different person, a different writer than Cathy or Suzie or anyone else, so whatever I bring to the table is a specific point of view. But I think I’ll see when I get there.

In that same vein, how do you see yourself fitting into the team and the history of the New York Times in respect to Cathy? She had a reputation for being a spectacular—but often ruthless—critic. Do you aim to be the same?
No. I aim to be me. I would never aim to be the same as Cathy. She was terrific, and I have enormous respect for her and read everything she wrote. I loved sitting next to her at shows, I loved talking to her about lots of things—fashion and beyond. But we’re different people and we’re different writers. What I do will be different.

Your Moschino review was pretty sharp-tongued. What kind of response did you get to that piece?
Some people liked it, people agreed or disagreed. It was mostly via Twitter. I think Jeremy [Scott] tweeted his Facebook likes. But no one said anything, no one called me from Moschino and said, “How could you do that?” There was a reason I said what I said, it wasn’t just gratuitous, and hopefully I expressed that. I really look forward to seeing what he does next. Continue Reading “A Sign of the Times: Vanessa Friedman on the State of Fashion Criticism and Her New Gig” »

Vanessa Friedman Joins the New York Times as Fashion Director and Critic

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Vanessa FriedmanFollowing the departure of Cathy Horyn and Suzy Menkes, Vanessa Friedman, formerly the fashion editor of London’s Financial Times, is joining the New York Times as fashion director and chief fashion critic. She will begin at her new post next month.

Speculation among editors at last month’s shows was that Friedman had been lobbying hard for the Times position, and some even felt that it was no accident that her Moschino takedown in the FT had a certain Horyn-like vigor. Friedman has served as the FT‘s fashion editor since 2002. Prior to her role there, she was a regular contributor to such publications as The New Yorker and Vogue, and was the founding fashion and features director for InStyle UK. No doubt, she’ll make a strong addition to the evolving NY Times fashion team.

Photo: Getty Images

Runway to Red Carpet: Rihanna (Also Other Stars) Steal the Front-Row Spotlight

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Miu Miu

When it came to star sightings, the front rows at the Fall ’14 shows gave the Oscars a run for its money. The celebrity set came out strong this fashion season, supporting the designers who dress them for so many of their red-carpet moments. Lupita Nyong’o, who brought home an Academy Award this past weekend, was spotted in the front rows of Miu Miu and Calvin Klein Collection, both of which helped her top best-dressed lists during her promo tour for 12 Years a Slave, as well as the awards season. At Miu Miu, she turned up in a burgundy jacket with an embellished collar by the label and a light pink miniskirt, while for Calvin Klein Collection, she donned a pale knit dress from Pre-Fall ’14. Jason Wu’s debut at Hugo Boss in New York also brought out a bevy of stars, including Gwyneth Paltrow, Reese Witherspoon, and Diane Kruger, who led the standing ovation at the show’s close.

Notables were also spotted in the front row of Burberry Prorsum‘s London show, a favorite among Hollywood’s elite. Naomie Harris looked on in a long, navy velvet devoré and a green gown. In Milan, Jeremy Scott’s first runway show for Moschino brought out celebs known for their playful fashion choices. Rita Ora and Katy Perry were among the front-row dwellers in looks from the Pre-Fall ’14 lineup.

Despite all of the big names who attended the Paris shows (including Jared Leto, Keira Knightley, and Kanye West), all eyes were on Rihanna. RiRi stole the spotlight, turning up at all of the biggest shows like Chanel, Dior, Givenchy, Miu Miu, Lanvin, and Stella McCartney, just to name a few. While it’s difficult to choose a highlight from her flawless arsenal of looks, we were particularly taken by the Melitta Baumeister, Hyein Seo, and Adam Selman mash-up she wore to Comme des Garçons; her gray peplum jacket and fur shrug at Lanvin; and the sexy LBD she paired with stockings and a cherry Pre-Fall ’14 mink coat at Dior. She was a street-style photographer’s dream from start to finish.

Here, more front-row highlights from the Fall ’14 shows.

Photo: Courtesy of Miu Miu

Rossella Jardini Joins the Missoni Family

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jardiniMoschino seems to be in the headlines more and more often these days. Following Jeremy Scott’s riotous debut collection in Milan last week (would you like fries with that?), WWD reports that the house’s former creative director Rossella Jardini has been tapped by Missoni. Jardini joins her friend Angela Missoni and will be acting as a “consultant” to the Italian house. “She is an experienced and extraordinary designer, expert in merchandising, photography, style, fabrics, and shapes,” Missoni said. She added that Jardini is “like family. I’ve known her for so long.” This will certainly be a dynamic duo to watch when the Spring shows come around.

Photo: IndigitalImages