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August 2 2014

styledotcom "I would say to to myself, 'One day, you'll be famous.' That was revenge." @YSL stylem.ag/1qQ7fLg pic.twitter.com/Qo9sJzTSie

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78 posts tagged "Naomi Campbell"

i-D Ups Its Online Game

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i-D

Last week, i-D rolled out its eye-popping new Web site, i-d.co. Having launched with a collaborative M.I.A. x Kenzo music video, the iconic magazine’s new online home will offer full-bleed imagery, quirky videos starring personalities such as Rick Owens, Lily McMenamy, Sky Ferreira, and more, and, soon, an interactive social-media component. The Web venture, which was feted at a veritable runway rave in New York last night, is a decidedly high-tech move for the publication, which, founded by Terry Jones in 1980, earned cult status because of its gritty fanzine approach to documenting London’s creative culture. Of course, it also helped that, early in their careers, photographers such as Nick Knight, Mario Testino, and Juergen Teller shot for the publication, and Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell, and even Madonna winked for its covers in their youth.

The site is thanks in part to Vice—the forward-thinking, in-your-face, Brooklyn-based media company that acquired i-D last December. “Vice’s whole push was to take i-D into the digital realm, which it wasn’t. We had a Web site, but it’s nothing like what we have now,” offered i-D editor Holly Shackleton. “Vice has been incredibly respectful. They haven’t been involved in our editorial choices,” she added. “They’ve just given us the digital know-how and business sense to start something new and launch the site.” More developments are on the horizon. i-D will soon open an office here in New York, and Jones, who’s been with the publication for the past thirty-three years, will take a notable step back. “He’ll always be on the masthead as founder,” offered Shackleton, stressing that while he’ll still be somewhat involved, he’s looking to spend more time with his family.

The Web site’s launch party in West Chelsea was a fitting display of fresh, edgy clothes and pioneering technology. In partnership with Samsung, the magazine flew over three of London’s hottest new talents—Ryan LO, Claire Barrow, and Ashley Williams (all Fashion East alums)—and had them present their collections in a holographic show. It was one-part IRL models (including Hanne Gaby Odiele), one-part virtual projections. Audience members (M.I.A. among them) could hardly tell who was real and who was simulated as the catwalkers danced amid computer-generated acid rain and floating gemstones. The crowd bounced and, at some points, fist-pumped to the EDM runway tunes. And even though partygoers were sipping champagne, the event exuded the underground cool that made i-D a force in the first place. “i-D has always been a global fashion community, and we hope the new site will encourage that,” said Shackleton. “We wanted to introduce these young British talents to a New York audience. They’re all future stars, without a doubt.”

Take a look at i-D‘s new online digs at www.i-d.vice.com.

Photo: Laura June Kirsch

House of Versace Is Coming to a TV Screen Near You

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Gina Gershon

Among designers, Donatella Versace’s story is one of the more dramatic ones. Here is a woman who has dealt with family tragedy, betrayal, addiction, and disapproving male authorities, and seems to have come out fabulously on top. You might say her tale has the makings of a Lifetime movie.

Which is exactly what it is now. Last night, the likes of Helena Christensen and Michael Stipe headed to the Museum of Modern Art, where the network screened its new biopic, House of Versace, with the Cinema Society. Like the book on which it’s based—Deborah Ball’s attention-getting 2010 exposé —the telefilm is unauthorized by its subject. The house of Versace didn’t participate in the Lifetime movie and dismissed it in a recent statement as “a work of fiction.”

That said, star Gina Gershon has the designer’s self-presentation down pat: the mannerisms, the sense of humor, the distinctively indistinct approach to English. Gershon smoked “one or two packs a day” to prepare for the role, she explained before last night’s screening, and walked around in higher heels than usual to perfect the gait. To keep her face resembling Versace’s as the years passed, Gershon added, “I tried a little bit of cotton, a little bit of gum. It kept falling out. I ended up using Scotch tape.” Hey, it’s a TV movie.

Director Sara Sugarman attended the same arts school as a child as Naomi Campbell, and considered reaching out. “I wanted to, but they thought it was a bad idea,” she explained. “I think they thought our budget was stretched enough without getting Naomi Campbell to be in one scene.”

House of Versace airs on Lifetime on Saturday, October 5, at 8 p.m.

Photo:Matteo Prandoni/BFAnyc.com

Katie Grand Still Loves Hogan

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If the Fall ’13 campaigns and Spring ’14 runways have left you craving more surprise appearances from nineties supers (Christy Turlington starred in Fall ads for Calvin Klein Underwear, Jason Wu, and Prada; Naomi Campbell strutted her stuff down DVF’s Spring runway; Kate Moss was printed across Giles Deacon’s Spring dresses, etc.), look no further than Katie Grand’s latest Hogan short for your next fix. To showcase her Spring ’14 collaboration with the label (the third installment of the ongoing series), Grand asked Dan Jackson to direct a film featuring Linda Evangelista and Stephanie Seymour, as well as Joan Smalls, Sam Rollinson, Edie Campbell, Georgia May Jagger, Liu Wen, and more, dancing about in the new collection. As for the Spring range, it boasts soft leather jackets and accessories kissed with Grand’s signature Pop aesthetic. The lineup, which Grand describes as “slick, sexy, straight-to-the-point practicality,” includes stark white creepers, polka-dot pouches, slim stilettos, and duffel bags and iPhone cases embellished with the collaboration’s heart motif—a nod to Grand’s Love magazine. See it all in the flick’s exclusive debut, above.

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Talks Image-Making in the Digital Age

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Matin Zad

Stylist Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele knows a thing or two about fashion imagery. You know all those photographs from the late eighties and nineties of supermodels like Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Claudia Schiffer decked out in Versace, Chanel, and piles upon piles of gilded baubles? Well, we have her to thank for those.

De Dudzeele’s reputation for creating vivacious, lasting images is undoubtedly one of the reasons Bottega Veneta tapped her to sit on the judging panel of its 2013 New Exposure Photography Competition (she’s joined by heavy hitters such as Craig McDean, Guido Palau, Andrew Bolton, and Bottega’s own Tomas Maier). Launched last year in an effort to discover and support emerging talents, the competition features five standout finalists this year. And tonight, at New York’s Openhouse Gallery, Collin Kelly, Emma Powell, Masha Sardari, Matin Zad, or Shae DeTar will be announced as the 2013 victor. The finalists’ photographs debut here. And below, in between shoots and shows, de Dudzeele weighs in on photography in the digital age, discusses the overuse of Photoshop, and offers aspiring image-makers some invaluable advice.

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How has the process of image-making changed throughout the course of your career? And what’s remained the same?

Good ones are good ones! The talented people will still stay the same—they have it in their [guts]. What’s changed is that the focus on set has gone from looking at the subject…to looking at a monitor. Nowadays, people sometimes forget to have fun and to have their own point of view. Fashion photography still has, and needs a lot of, original ideas. The digital is just a tool.

What qualities do you feel make a successful image in this digital age?

Energy, capturing a moment, composition, authenticity, creativity!

What traits did you look for while judging the Bottega competition?

I was looking for a personal eye, a unique image, a sensitivity, and honesty… not a reproduction of something done before.

Is there anything you miss about a more classic approach to photography? And, conversely, is there anything you really love about images?

I miss the happy surprise! I miss the focus on the subject and the attention to details. It used to be that nothing could get “removed” or fixed afterwards. When you had it, you knew it. Digital is good to build a story, as you can work on layout and cropping, then. Technology can help a bad photographer get better, but ultimately, good photography does not need to be reworked.

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Is Photoshop used too much today? When do you feel it’s appropriate?

Yes! Moving around the filter and switching heads, hands, arms, everything, this is not the essence of a unique photograph. This is not real talent. Photoshopping is appropriate to enhance a beauty that’s already there—to help the dream come true.

Have your aesthetic values changed since the digital embrace?
My aesthetic has not changed. I love the girls, the fashion, the joy, the energy, and the ideas. Creating fun, iconic images still is the goal.

What advice would you give to emerging image-makers, whether they’re stylists or photographers, today?
Be you! Don’t over-reference. And love it! Sometimes, what people think is bad…is good.

Is there anything you’d like to add?
It’s only fashion!

Photos: Matin Zad, Emma Powell, Collin Kelly, Shat DeTar, Masha Sardari

Jessica Stam Joins the LPD Dream Team

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LPD's Stam Shirt

What does Jessica Stam have in common with Karl Lagerfeld, Miuccia Prada, Riccardo Tisci, and Dries Van Noten? The model can now claim an LPD New York T-shirt boldly emblazoned with her last name and birth year (’86) in black. Last night, Stam and LPD founder Benjamin Fainlight hosted friends including Jennifer Fisher and Athena Calderone at The Jane hotel to celebrate the launch of the new “Team Stam” collaboration jersey that will benefit the catwalker’s charity of choice, Many Hopes, which invests in sustainable community development in Kenya. One hundred percent of the proceeds from each shirt will go to the foundation. “My friend connected me with Stam and thought there was potential to use LPD and her shared platform to give back to a really great cause,” Fainlight told Style.com.

Over the past year, LPD New York’s novelty tees have developed a cult following with the street-style set, and Fainlight recently expanded beyond designers’ names with the Artist Series, which includes Hirst, Pollock, and Warhol styles. Beginning with Team Stam, we think Fainlight is onto something with models—who wouldn’t want to advertise their allegiance to Team Campbell, Team Moss, or Team Smalls? The designer hinted, “Well, I can’t give away too much, but I might just have that same concept coming out with a prevalent online retailer [chances are it's Net-a-Porter] that has been amazing about supporting the brand and giving us a global stage.” Building off of this idea, Stam suggested, “It would be neat if other philanthropic models like Liya Kebede, Christy Turlington Burns for Every Mother Counts, and Karlie Kloss for FEED got involved in another round of shirts.”

A potential model series isn’t the only project in the pipeline for LPD. On Friday evening, the label will stage its first NYFW concept presentation in conjunction with Conflict of Interest (known for its witty fashion T-shirts splashed with puns like “Ballinciaga” or “Ill Slander”). At the Spring ’14 show, Fainlight will debut a full cut-and-sewn collection including tailored outerwear, knitwear, and trousers that reportedly focuses on unorthodox finishings and treatments. “I really wanted to play with the conventions of streetwear and incorporate high-fashion concepts,” Fainlight said. “I think this new direction will show people that we’re a lot more than a T-shirt brand.”

Photo: Courtesy of LPD NYC

Photo: Courtesy of LPD NYC