Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
21 posts tagged "Nate Lowman"

Jason Wu Curates for a Cause

-------

Bruce Weber

On June 11, Jason Wu will merge good art with a good cause when he hosts the Second Annual Young Friends of ACRIA Summer Soirée. But his involvement with the AIDS research and education foundation goes far beyond turning up at the benefit and smiling for Billy Farrell. “I want to help pave the way for my generation to get involved,” said Wu, who sits on ACRIA’s board. “I love what ACRIA does, and it’s great for me to be able to work with people I admire, like Francisco Costa and Donna Karan.”

In order to help raise funds for the organization, the designer has put together an extensive auction of photographs (fashion and otherwise), the proceeds from which will naturally go to ACRIA. “Last year I collaborated with artist Nate Lowman on T-shirts, and I wanted to continue the art-and-fashion element,” said Wu. “So I thought it would be nice to curate a collection of photographs by young and established photographers that I admire.”

Inez & Vinoodh; Herb Ritts

Open for bidding now on paddle8.com, the auction includes Inez & Vinoodh’s Guinevere Descending a Staircase; Herb Ritts’ 1991 portrait of a pensive Karl Lagerfeld; and Bruce Weber’s erotic snap Gregory and Sacha, Nantucket, Mass, 2012, as well as works by up-and-comers, like Kevin Tachman’s moody shot from Rick Owens’ Fall ’13 show, Kelly Klein’s punk-tinged image, and Gregory Harris’ uplifting 2008 photograph New Hope.

Rick Owens“I’d like the younger generation of creative people to be able to afford and have these things,” offered Wu. To wit, starting bids range from $400 (for Simon Burstall’s grayscale image) to $6,000 (for a Weber or Steven Meisel). Sure, it’s no small investment, but these are pretty appealing prices when it comes to big-name photographers. “This is a great way for people who are really interested in collecting to get an incredible work that most people in their 20s and 30s wouldn’t be able to buy.” A collector as well as a philanthropist (his latest acquisition was an Inez & Vinoodh-lensed print of his Spring ’14 campaign with Karen Elson), Wu places himself in this category. “I’ll definitely be bidding on everything!” he laughed. Why not join him?

Photos: Bruce Weber, Inez & Vinoodh, Herb Ritts; Kevin Tachman; all courtesy of paddle8.com

Andrew Richardson: Downtown and Dirty

-------

Richardson

Sex and streetwear aren’t the most obvious bedfellows, but editor, stylist, and all-around provocateur Andrew Richardson has united them in his new store, Richardson. “I don’t know if there is a logical connection between sex and streetwear, but I always thought that streetwear was sexy and cool,” he mused between puffs on a cigarette. “There’s always an attitude, and I think that’s sexy—sexy confidence.” That may be so, but his shop, which opens this Friday at 325 Broome Street in New York, sells swag that’s arguably more perverse than confidence-boosting hoodies.

Best known for his cerebral, self-titled sex magazine, also called Richardson, Andrew is well versed in the streetwear subculture—he’s even done a bevy of projects with cult label (or, as some would argue, lifestyle) Supreme. In his store, Andrew presents his liberated take on sex and bondage via clever T-shirts, bomber jackets, swim trunks, caps, and towels—many of which were created in collaboration with such artists as Christopher Wool, Bjarne Melgaard, and Aaron Bondaroff. Some highlights include a melting snowman shirt by Nate Lowman; a tee printed with a car that reads “Blow Jobs”; totes scribed with the store’s ethos, “Work hard, play nice, communicate”; and a sweatsuit by artist Mark Gonzales. Embellished with images of lady parts and a cowboy flaunting his impressive member, the latter is guaranteed to inspire stares.

Olympia le Tan

The shop goes beyond threads, though. For instance, good pal Olympia Le-Tan designed a signature patch for Richardson’s club car jacket—more intriguing, though, is her capsule of erotic minaudières (think bags embroidered with busty femmes and titles like Fanny Hill, Cutter Girl, Carnal Cargo, or Sweet and 20.) Above the clutches’ case hang drawings by Japanese artist Hauro Namaikawa that depict couples in compromising, albeit comical, positions. And, across the room, shelves are lined with an A-to-Z collection of erotic tomes, which was curated by Idea Books, London. Richardson is, of course, on sale, too. “There are going to be guys who are my age who are going to come in and spend $1,800 on an original drawing, and I think we’ll have 25-year-old skaters who want to wear fucked-up T-shirts to scare their parents,” said Andrew of his clientele. “There’ll be a range.”

When the editor—whose résumé, it should be noted, includes working on Madonna’s Sex book, as well as shoots with heavyweights like Terry Richardson, Steven Meisel, and Ellen von Unwerth—was asked about the thinking behind his sex-themed products, he told us, “I was always into that idea of idolizing women through sexual provocation…and I’m trying to find that fine line between palatability and provocation. If you’re too provocative, you end the debate.” Ultimately, his patrons will be the ones to decide whether he’s found that balance; however, no matter how explicit or ridiculous Richardson’s offerings may be, everything is done with a wink, a smile, and a streetwise attitude. And somehow, that makes it seem all the sexier.

Richardson

Photos: Michael Aghy

Big Shots: Jason Wu and Nate Lowman Team Up for ACRIA

-------

Jason Wu x Nate Lowman's T-shirt

Last year, ACRIA—the pioneering HIV/AIDS research foundation with a strong foothold in the design world—founded its Young Friends section, a branch conceived to engage and attract new supporters from the fields of art, fashion, film, et al. On June 13, member Jason Wu is set to sponsor and host the initiative’s first official event here in New York. And as a prelude to the soiree, he tapped artist and pal Nate Lowman for a limited-edition collaboration. The result? A unisex T-shirt, screened with one of Lowman’s infamous, shot-through-the-middle air fresheners.

“It was originally an aluminum silkscreened piece that was actually quite large,” Wu told Style.com. “Nate’s signature is reappropriating everyday things.” The print is instantly recognizable—a pared-down little pine tree shadowed and patterned with a blown-up Xerox effect. No stranger to link-ups with visual artists, Wu offered, “I’ve always loved working with such creative individuals—I remember working with KAWS.” (Together they created prints for Spring/Summer 2012.) As for Lowman’s signature bullet hole, Wu is a fan. “It made for an iconic motif,” he said.

The Jason Wu x Nate Lowman T-shirt is available for $175 from today at www.jasonwustudio.com (proceeds will go to the foundation). For tickets to the Young Friends of ACRIA’s Summer Soiree, contact give@acria.org.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Lots To See, Just One Eye

-------

Just One Eye is not your typical e-tailer. For starters, their brick-and-mortar flagship stands in the mazelike Hollywood compound where Howard Hughes used to live, work, and seduce movie stars. But really, it’s their product selection that makes them so extraordinary. Where else could you find a Warhol-signed Rolling Stones necktie tee, some Carlo Bugatti chairs, and a range of antique fine jewelry alongside looks from Rodarte, Proenza Schouler, Olympia Le-Tan, and Maiyet? Since opening the store last spring, co-founder Paola Russo (formerly of Maxfield) has focused on mixing fashion and art. And we mean big-time art. Ed Ruscha has been collaborating in various ways since the shop’s launch. Work by Murakami, among others, hangs on the walls at headquarters. And today, the shop is launching the first in an ongoing series of artist/designer collaborations, debuting a limited-edition range of Damien Hirst-decorated backpacks from The Row.

According to Russo, Just One Eye’s interest in commissioning these projects comes from the store’s mandate to create “specialness.” “Our vision,” she explains, “is to make and sell things that will last. We don’t want to be involved with mass-produced fads,” she says. “Real luxury is something that is timeless and exceptional.” Naturally, true luxury comes with a hair-raising price tag. Or, in the case of the backpacks, which ring in at a cool $55,000, a gasp-worthy one. But it helps to know that some of that cash will go to a good cause. A portion of the proceeds from the bags will be donated to UNICEF; ditto Just One Eye’s next, more cost-democratic collaboration, which will see Nate Lowman teaming up with Converse. “He’s painting 25 pairs,” says Russo. “So the question for the people who buy these shoes will be, you know, do you wear them, or keep them as art?” A question many of us have posed about our shoes. But not typically of our sneakers.

Visit Just One Eye at justoneeye.com.

Buying Brooklyn: The Art Edition

-------

For the style set that insists on local food, local booze, and locally sourced designs, here’s local art. The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) kicks off its eighth annual BAMart Silent Auction tomorrow, and honorary curator Beth Rudin DeWoody selected pieces made by artists either based in Brooklyn or who have previously collaborated with BAM. They include Nate Lowman, Richard Prince, and Terence Koh. Polaroid portraits of Dolly Parton, Keith Haring, and Bianca Jagger may go quickly, but we’re told that a few other artists’ works are set to be the big-ticket items here. Among them, a piece (pictured) by Mickalene Thomas (whose portrait of Michelle Obama was the first painting of the First Lady to be acquired by the National Portrait Gallery), an ink and graphite work by Matthew Ritchie, and an etching (Plate Distortion II) by Tauba Auerbach. The works are currently on display at the Dorothy W. Levitt Lobby of the Peter Jay Sharp Building at BAM and viewable online. The auction, supporting BAM initiatives, launches tomorrow on Paddle8.com and runs through April 22.

Art: Mickalene Thomas