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39 posts tagged "Nick Knight"

Kanye’s Complex Close-up

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A still from Kanye West's collaborative film with Nick Knight

The partnership of Nick Knight and Kanye West is one of the must-see unholy alliances of the moment. Their latest joint venture, the video for “Blkkk Skkkn Head,” off of West’s new album, Yeezus, arrived today on KanyeWest.com. Why the Web site-only upload? Only on Kanye’s site does the video have its full functionality, allowing viewers (on some browsers, at least) to speed up or slow down the track and video, and to capture stills from it to upload to their various social media feeds. (The snapshot button is an Instagram icon.) As in-your-face as that share button may be, it’s one of the few ways you still can get some Kanye of your own. The product of West’s other recent unholy alliance, his capsule collection with A.P.C., has already sold out.

Photo: via KanyeWest.com

Bottega Veneta’s Got Art Smarts

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Bottega Veneta's Fall '13 Ads

For the past few years, Bottega Veneta designer Tomas Maier has taken an artistic approach to his campaigns, tapping multidisciplinary photographers such as Nan Goldin, Nick Knight, Annie Leibovitz, Jack Pierson, Peter Lindbergh, and more to bring a dynamic edge to his ads. Dubbed the Art of Collaboration, the project continues this season, with Maier commissioning New York-based artist Ralph Gibson to lens the Fall ’13 campaign. Best known for his eerie images with erotic undertones, Gibson turned out a series of moody snaps for the Italian house. His high-impact shots, which star Fall ’13 show-opener Raquel Zimmermann, debut above, exclusively on Style.com.

Photo: Ralph Gibson

Barbie Goes Abroad

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It would seem that Barbie and co. can’t get enough of the London fashion scene. After receiving a rainbow dye job from East London salon Bleach, as well as a graffitied makeover from Louise Gray, last year, and sending Ken to get some new Gareth Pugh threads in 2009, Barbie has tapped Roksanda Ilincic and Nick Knight’s Showstudio to design her new virtual Dreamhouse. Considering Ilincic, who created a frock for Barbie four years ago in honor of her fiftieth anniversary (left), has a background in architecture, we assume she’s more than qualified for the job. Introduced in 1962, Barbie’s Dreamhouses have, of course, traditionally had a Malibu twist, but the new mini-mansion—set to be revealed later this summer—will pull inspiration from London’s gritty streets. Expect a harder, more subversive edge than the previous plastic abodes, but, knowing Ilincic, no less pink.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Kristen McMenamy Through The Years

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As the self-proclaimed “first weird-looking model,” Kristen McMenamy has broken just about every rule there is during her thirty years (and counting) in fashion, which exactly is why we chose to profile her in the new issue of Style.com/Print. Throughout her career, the irreverent icon became renowned for her androgynous appeal, eccentric personality, madwoman-on-a-mission runway walk, and willingness to sacrifice life and limb in pursuit of the elusive perfect picture.

McMenamy was a fixture in the glossies during her nineties heyday (back then, her cropped hair, shaved eyebrows, unconventional features, and sinewy frame made her an ideal poster girl for the grunge movement); she has shot with the likes of Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Juergen Teller, and Nick Knight, who took the pared-down portraits of her that run in Style.com/Print. Along the way, she has cultivated a support system of designers. “If fashion is her family, then Donatella Versace is her big sister,” writes Jo-Ann Furniss in her profile. That makes Karl Lagerfeld McMenamy’s proverbial father. Lagerfeld did, after all, walk her down the aisle at her ’99 wedding to photographer Miles Aldridge, in addition to casting her in a multitude of campaigns and runway shows.

See them all in our slideshow roundup of McMenamy’s career highlights >

Daphne Guinness Sings the Blues

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Artist, producer, muse—all words that describe Daphne Guinness. But soprano? Well, there’s a bolt from the blue. Last night, Guinness unveiled her first single (on vinyl, no less), “Fatal Flaw,” at Nick Knight’s SHOWstudio in London’s Belgravia neighborhood—a fitting setting for the reveal, as Knight actually filmed and live-streamed Guinness singing opera last year. (The shoot resulted in five short films that were played in the windows of the French department store Printemps.) Yesterday evening’s event also served as the opening of SHOWcabinet, an intensely personal display case within the SHOWstudio gallery (consider it like an old-time curiosity cabinet) where artists present objects that have mattered throughout their lives.

Guinness is the first to take a turn in Knight’s SHOWcabinet, and the pieces on view indeed tell the story of her life: an ornate armored glove that she created over the span of five years in collaboration with Shaun Leane, a beloved Gareth Pugh leather cage jacket, and some works from Percy Bysshe Shelley and Shakespeare—her constant companions over the years.

Here, in an exclusive interview, Guinness and Knight speak with Style.com about why she decided to bare her soul—and her vocal chords.

Daphne, who knew you were a singer, and a soprano no less. Did you have any formal training?
Daphne Guinness: I wasn’t trained at all—I just made the song up, by mistake actually. If anything, I probably trained myself by listening over the years. I have a four-and-a-half-, nearly five-octave range. I probably should have had extra lessons as a child, as I am certain my family heard my potential, but I didn’t. I was in the choir as a schoolgirl, but really, it is all self-taught.

Why music now?
DG: After children, I had a break in my top range, as my diaphragm dropped because it naturally stretched out. I couldn’t make that jump to singing smoothly. Holding a note is a very difficult thing—you have to use your whole body to achieve a perfect pitch. So my singing languished a bit, but it has always been there. I know it sounds ridiculous when I say I am not a fashion person, because of course I am, but music has a complete effect on me, and the time was ripe to reacquaint myself with it. I suppose I am known for being very visual, but I realized that, for me, it’s all about sound.

Nick Knight: What is interesting is that very few people know that music and sound are really a fundamental part of you. But I do think there is a lot of crossover in the senses, especially with sound and sight. For instance, when I am creating an image, I am actually subliminally looking for a tone or sound, which I don’t hear, but see. So when I get a great picture, in fact I am hearing this perfectly harmonious sound. It’s almost like I am tuning one of my pictures like an instrument. So there is a lot of swap-over between the senses. Unfortunately, we are so conditioned to use one sense for one thing, when actually it is a whole mixture of senses at play in an artistic process. Continue Reading “Daphne Guinness Sings the Blues” »