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September 3 2014

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70 posts tagged "Nicolas Ghesquiere"

Ushering in a New Era of The Fashion Book

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The Fashion Book

Fifteen years ago, Phaidon published The Fashion Book. As its title suggests, the book quickly became the definitive resource for the fashion curious and industry mainstay alike—an A-to-Z guide to the field’s central influencers, with pages devoted to everyone from Vivienne Westwood and Helmut Newton to Oscar Wilde. Last night at Topshop in Soho, Phaidon celebrated the release of an updated version of The Fashion Book. The tome features seventy-two fresh entries (Style.com among them), and boasts pages devoted to individuals such as Nicolas Ghesquière, Tilda Swinton, and others.

The fete’s main event was a panel discussion moderated by Parsons the New School for Design’s dean, Simon Collins. It included Vera Wang, Iris Apfel, and our very own Dirk Standen. The group focused on what it means to be iconic (“Being an icon implies a very distinct point of view, which is rather rare today,” said Apfel), the figures who inspire them (“It’s people who never really sold out, someone like Peter Saville,” said Standen), and, in reference to Rick Owens’ recent statement-making show, what it means for an icon to change and evolve. On that topic, Wang offered, “Mr. Lagerfeld said to me once, ‘Vera, if you really can’t change and you can’t go with the times and you can’t realize how the world is becoming a different place, then it’s time for you to leave.’ So it’s somewhere between that fine line of adapting every decade and sticking to what you believe in and furthering your craft.” It was an honest and up-front dialogue about the connotations of holding influence in the industry today—a fitting prelude to The Fashion Book of the millennial era.

The Fashion Book New Edition, $59.95, will be available from Phaidon beginning October 14.

Photo: Courtesy of Phaidon Press

Ghesquière To Vuitton? Don’t Believe Everything You Hear—Yet

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Nicolas GhesquiereEasy there, rumor mill. After a series of reports—all seeming to stem from an Asian site called Luxury Society, but picked up by outlets ranging from The Cut to StyleCaster that Nicolas Ghesquière had been confirmed as Marc Jacobs’ successor at Louis Vuitton, a source at the French house told Style.com that it’s not so. The representative stated that Vuitton has no comment as to whether it’s considering Ghesquière for the creative director gig, and could not confirm when the identity of the new designer will be released. That being said, whispers about talks between Ghesquière and LVMH have been circulating for some time…and look at how last year’s rumor that Alexander Wang might get appointed to Balenciaga turned out. All we can say for now is: Stay tuned.

Photo: Alasdair McLellan / Style.com/PRINT

Phaidon’s The Fashion Book Gets an Update

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The Fashion Book New Edition

It’s no secret that Phaidon’s epic The Fashion Book, first released in 1998, is an authoritative resource for industry insiders and fans alike. Now the coffee-table tome has been given new life with a definitive updated addition. Among the seventy-two new entries are Style.com and sartorial luminaries like Bill Cunningham, Nicolas Ghesquière, and Tilda Swinton. To fete the book’s release, Phaidon will be hosting a panel discussion at Topshop’s Soho outpost on Thursday, October 10, at 6 p.m. Iris Apfel, Vera Wang, and Style.com’s own Dirk Standen will be on hand to talk fashion history and the new guard of style alongside moderator Simon Collins, dean of fashion at Parsons the New School for Design. Need another reason to turn out? You’ll have a chance to pick up the new book (as well as a limited edition tote bag and a signed print by cover illustrator Mats Gustafson) four days in advance of its official release.

The Fashion Book New Edition, $59.95, will be available from Phaidon beginning October 14.

Photo: Courtesy of Phaidon Press

Marc Jacobs Bids Adieu to Louis Vuitton

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Marc Jacobs, taking his final bow at Louis Vuitton after the Spring '14 showLVMH announced today that, after sixteen years at the helm at Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs will be stepping down from his post in order to focus on his namesake brand, which WWD reports he’s taking public. The news broke following Jacobs’ Spring ’14 show for Vuitton, and while rumors that Nicolas Ghesquière will replace Jacobs have been circulating, LVMH has yet to name a successor.

Before Jacobs was appointed as the brand’s first creative director in 1997, the house was all about its iconic, monogrammed handbags and travel trunks. There was no Louis Vuitton ready-to-wear—no epic Paris fashion week sets, no Kate Moss cameos, no clothes. Jacobs’ debut Fall 1998 collection, which he showed sans music in Paris, was sheer minimalism, and a far cry from the opulent affairs he’s turned out in recent years. However, now, almost two decades later, Jacobs has transformed Vuitton from an old-world purveyor of superluxury travel goods to an international house at the forefront of fashion. Who could forget his artist collaborations, which he began with Stephen Sprouse’s graffitied handbags in Spring 2001? Or that time in 2010 when he dared to celebrate supermodels’ cleavage? And what would we talk about post-PFW if it weren’t for his outrageous runways (Fall 2012′s LV locomotive, anyone?)? Just in case your memory’s a little hazy, we’ve revisited Jacobs’ most unforgettable moments—sartorial and otherwise—from his time at Louis Vuitton. Click through our slideshow to see all his greatest hits.

Photo: Fabio Iona/InDigitalImages.com

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »