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70 posts tagged "Nicolas Ghesquiere"

Paco Rabanne Appoints Julien Dossena

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Julien DossenaPaco Rabanne has appointed 30-year-old up-and-coming French designer Julien Dossena as its new creative director today, reports WWD. He will show his first collection for the house during Paris fashion week on September 26. Dossena, who worked under Nicolas Ghesquière at Balenciaga before joining Paco Rabanne to assist its previous creative director, Lydia Maurer, in 2013, also launched his own line, Atto, this year, to much acclaim. “I’m delighted to be joining this house, which boasts a unique heritage,” said Dossena of his new post. Indeed, Paco Rabanne, whose namesake designer helped create the sixties’ sexed-up, metallic, space-age look when he launched the brand in 1966, has a rich history, but since its revival in 2011, the Spanish label has been somewhat of a revolving door. Manish Arora resigned after helming the house for two seasons, as did his successor, Maurer. We’re looking forward to seeing how Dossena interprets Paco Rabanne’s storied aesthetic.

Photo: Patrick Demarchelier

Chunky Necklaces Are at the Top of the Fashion Food Chain

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Chains at ChanelThanks to the tastemaking powers of Nicolas Ghesquière and Gaia Repossi, five-fingered rings and tough ear cuffs have been all the rage for the past year or so. But judging from the recent Resort collections, the new jewelry must-have is a chunky chain. We spied statement-making metal necklaces that were equal parts punk and hip-hop bling at Chanel, Bottega Veneta, Givenchy, and Lanvin, among others. Jenni Kayne, for her part, piled on the gold strands for an extra dose of swag (let’s just say that Jay-Z himself would be jealous), while Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, Bouchra Jarrar, and Hedi Slimane at Saint Laurent incorporated gleaming links as accents on their clothes. In addition to Rihanna, whose Céline ID choker has been in heavy rotation for some time now, cool girls such as Caroline de Maigret have taken a new liking to heavy-duty chokers. We’re betting they’ll be street-style status symbols at the Spring ’14 shows.

Here, a slide show of our favorite chains.

Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week

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Gildo Zegna, Patrizio Bertelli, Cav. Mario Boselli, and Diego Della Valle during the Camera Nazionale Della Moda Italiana press conference in Milan

At 8 a.m. on Sunday morning, the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana held a press conference at which attendance had been all but mandated weeks in advance. The early, un-Italian hour was no doubt meant to indicate the seriousness of the occasion, as was a lineup of speakers that included Patrizio Bertelli, Diego Della Valle, and Gildo Zegna, all of whom have joined the organization’s new board. Essentially, these captains of one of Italy’s most important and cherished industries have banded together to reinvigorate Milan’s increasingly hidebound fashion weeks. “I’ve heard the word boring,” Zegna acknowledged, though he insisted that wasn’t the case. The speeches were heavy on sweeping statements and light on concrete details, which provoked the assembly of sleep-deprived journalists into a volley of probing questions. Bertelli had earlier compared his fellow board members to “senators of fashion,” and he might have been thinking, Et tu, Suzy? as the International New York Times‘ Suzy Menkes led a round of interrogation into everything from Milan’s inhospitality to young designers to its perceived shortcomings on the digital front. Bertelli is no pushover, and he gave as good as he got. When a French journalist asked why we were only hearing from old men (Angela Missoni was a mostly silent presence on the board today), the Prada CEO told him he’d be a dangerous old man himself if he didn’t change his attitude, and then unexpectedly pointed out that Italy was the first country to abolish slavery, in the 1300s. By the end, one attendee was muttering, “Business as usual,” but if the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem, then today’s announcement should be welcomed as a positive development. Certainly there is enough firepower and entrepreneurial know-how on this new board to solve world peace, let alone bring new energy to a fashion week. Zegna stressed that the process would be a dialogue and said suggestions would be encouraged. In that spirit, here are seven modest proposals for improving Milan fashion week.

1. Lure young, international designers to Milan.
Menkes wondered how Milan would be replacing Burberry and Alexander McQueen, two brands that have recently decamped back to their native London. But the city’s relatively uncrowded schedule could be one of its biggest assets. Given how ridiculously packed the New York and, increasingly, London and Paris schedules have become, you would think any number of hot young brands could be persuaded to believe that they’d have a better chance of standing out in Milan. If access to Italy’s unparalleled production expertise were thrown in as part of the deal, who could resist?

2. Take the show on the road.
The British Fashion Council and, to some extent, the U.S.-based CFDA have done a good job of promoting their designers abroad. As part of the London Showrooms events, a dozen young U.K. talents have even careened around Hong Kong together on a bus. While there are barely enough young Milan-based designers to fill a Smart car let alone a minibus, and its more established designers are already well known internationally, it shouldn’t be too hard to come up with the right kind of touring exhibition. Picture a mix of up-and-comers such as Umit Benan, Andrea Pompilio, and Fausto Puglisi; some cult brands like MP Massimo Piombo and Aspesi; and a couple of designer offshoots like Versace’s Versus line and Lapo Elkann’s highly covetable new made-to-measure collaboration with Gucci—all introduced by a charming, high-profile figure (yes, we’re talking to you, Lapo). That would go some way to showing the rest of the world the extent of Italy’s ambitions. Continue Reading “Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week” »

Ghesquière is Back on the Map

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Or the cover, at least. The designer kept a low profile after departing Balenciaga in November (save his much-buzzed-about emergence in the twittersphere in December). But earlier this month, he was revealed as the star of System magazine’s debut issue, and today WWD reports that along with his muse Charlotte Gainsbourg, Ghesquière will cover the latest edition of German magazine 032c. “I may be putting myself in danger, but that’s what I want these days,” the designer told 032c when discussing his future plans—which are still unconfirmed but are rumored to involve an eponymous range. “I enjoyed years of extreme comfort at Balenciaga. It’s fantastic to harvest that status to explore in new ways, rather than sticking to a routine, even if it was the most comfortable and incredible, I couldn’t be in a better position.” 032c hits newsstands on Tuesday.

Photo: via 032c

Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far

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With the London shows wrapping today, and editors and models jetting off to Milan, it’s time to reflect on the catwalking highlights from the past two weeks. More so than any in recent memory, this season has been dominated by fresh faces. Nearly every new girl on our top-ten list from Spring, like Marine Deleeuw, Irina Kravchenko, Manon Leloup, and Esther Heesch, had majorly successful sophomore outings. But the Fall shows have brought in an additional crop of noteworthy rookies in demand.

Let’s begin with the handful of former Balenciaga exclusives, whose takeoffs were all but inevitable. Sam Rollinson (above, top left), who starred in a Burberry ad back in 2010 and was handpicked by Nicolas Ghesquière last season, had a strong NYFW. (She opened Reed Krakoff and walked Jason Wu, Alexander Wang, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Narciso Rodriguez, among others.) With a hometown advantage, the British brunette—whose cheekbones could cut glass—kept it up across the pond, scoring spots at Christopher Kane, Jonathan Saunders, and Giles. Two other Balenciaga favorites—Kremi Otashliyska and Chiharu Okunugi (above, lower right)—are also becoming runway regulars. The former hit catwalks at 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs, while the Japanese stunner took turns at Rag & Bone, Rodarte, and Marc Jacobs in New York, and Erdem and Giles in London.

Opening the Alexander Wang show is usually a surefire way to go straight to the top, but this season, the second girl out—Tess Hellfeuer (above, top right)—is getting all the buzz. The model finished New York by closing Marc Jacobs, then emerged as a clear favorite of Michelle Lee in London, where she opened Jonathan Saunders and walked in Christopher Kane. Mijo Mihaljcic has also been making all the right appearances in London. Her tomboy appeal landed her spots at Burberry Prorsum, Jonathan Saunders, and Richard Nicoll. Continue Reading “Modelizing Fall ’13 Thus Far” »