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September 1 2014

styledotcom Just in time for fashion week, @Barbie's wardrobe gets a designer update: stylem.ag/1tU7x1K pic.twitter.com/395jVSWYpk

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38 posts tagged "Nike"

Nike Goes Denim for Latest Liberty of London Collab

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What happens when an American sportswear powerhouse collaborates with a U.K. prints legend? We are talking about Nike and Liberty of London, who, yes, have collaborated since 2007, but for summer 2014, the two have done something extra special.

“Nike was clear from the beginning they were interested in denim looks,” explains Anna Buruma, Liberty archivist. “So we chose a number of fabrics from our archives which we felt best matched that description.”

Fabric and prints geeks out there, take note: From the vast and legendary Liberty archive, Nike chose “Anoosha,” a 1930s blossom and bell print; “Lora,” a take on a 1970s version of William Morris’ “Willow” pattern; and “Crown,” a paisley block print from deep in the archives.

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The patterns were printed on denim and remixed for some of Nike’s best-loved shoes, including the Air Max 1, Air Max 90, Roshe Run, Internationalist, Blazer, and Dunk Sky Hi. Magnhild Disington, Nike footwear designer, explains her choice: “These prints caught our eye right away, but rather than jump on it at the moment, we stepped away from it all and thought about it. If the prints came back to us a few days later, we knew they were the ones. They became something out of the moment, and became something more enduring—which for us led to a more authentic, honest collection.”

“From the dozens, if not hundreds, of prints we presented to Nike, their selection of prints for us was fascinating,” says Buruma. “The way they combined it was not only delightful for us, but I think will be for our customers.” Given the empty Nike shelves in Liberty a day after launch, it seems she was correct about that.

EXCLUSIVE: A.P.C. + Nike Is Back for Spring

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This Thursday, A.P.C. will release its latest collaboration with Nike, an Air Max 1 done up in an all-navy combo of suede, mesh, and leather, with a white midsole and gum outsole. You’re seeing them first, exclusively on Style.com. The kicks are simple and clean, keeping true to A.P.C.’s understated aesthetic. Available for both men and women in-stores and online for $120.

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Adidas x Raf Simons Returns for Spring

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Adidas x Raf SimonsNot to be outdone by the Nike + R.T. Air Force 1 Riccardo Tisci collab, Adidas is unleashing another round of Raf Simons kicks for spring.

Building on the initial Fall 2013 collection that included just three styles of performance runners, this drop includes a whole slew of new unisex models—eight to be exact, each in up to four different colorways. Blending classic three-stripe silhouettes like on the Stan Smith with new tech and exaggerated shapes, bright colors and flashy patterns, the lineup looks like a footwear collection designed for a gang of very fashionable superheroes.

The brand is establishing itself as the go-to for designers looking to experiment with sneakers, and Simons is in good company at Adidas, where Rick Owens, Jeremy Scott, and Mark McNairy also have ongoing collections. Based on what we saw during fashion season—both Chanel and Dior had trainers on their couture runways—the trend will only continue to gain momentum.

Adidas x Raf Simons prices range from $440 to $570. The collection arrives soon at Adidas Originals concept stores, boutiques, and retailers carrying RAF.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Can’t Kick the Swoosh: A One-on-One With Nike CEO Mark Parker

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Clad in his signature blazer, light blue shirt, dark jeans, and black sneakers embellished with gleaming white swooshes, Nike CEO Mark Parker took the stage in Barcelona last week like the Steve Jobs of sports gear. A crowd including just about every soccer journalist in the world, along with a smattering of international fashion and lifestyle media, had gathered in the Spanish city, where football is worshiped with religious fanaticism, to see Parker introduce Nike’s latest project: the Magista football boot. (That’s a soccer cleat to you, Yankees.) The new shoes will be worn by more than seventy players during the World Cup in Brazil this June.

The Magista’s radical design features a knit upper with a collar that covers the ankle. Not the most exciting footwear development for those who aren’t concerned with ball control, but as with any Nike announcement, it offered an occasion to consider how the sportswear giant will continue to keep a foothold in style.

Many Nike innovations—Free, Flyknit, Lunar—find a second life in the fashion world. For Parker, who got his start at Nike in 1979 working as a footwear designer, that’s an unintended side effect of the process. Even so, it was impossible to escape the swoosh during the Fall ’14 shows, as everyone from Susie Bubble to My Theresa’s Veronika Heilbrunner mixed Nikes with their high-styled fashion week looks. And then, of course, there’s Riccardo Tisci, whose admiration for the brand has manifested in a much-buzzed-about range of collaborative kicks. Here, Parker talks to Style.com about authenticity, the sport-fashion crossover, and what it means to be an innovator.

“Innovation” is a word that gets thrown around a lot when you talk to people at Nike. From a design perspective, what does the word mean to you?
Well, it is a word that I think, just in the general vernacular, gets thrown around too much and abused. I’m not speaking about Nike necessarily—just in general.

For us it actually means creating a product that is truly new and better, so it’s about improving. We’re a performance-based company; we strive to help athletes get better and realize their potential. But “better” is a key word.

We take input from everyone, so the innovation process at Nike is driven by being incredibly observant; by the relationship we have with athletes; and by the deep, personal connections we have. We don’t just think about what athletes need to perform but what they need as individuals, as people with opinions. It’s not just about performance but aesthetics, too. So all of that gets factored in along with the latest in technologies, materials, components, and processes to improve.

You mentioned aesthetics. Often the big Nike innovations trickle down into the Nike Sportswear line, or they wind up being used by people who aren’t just concerned about performance but about fashion and style. At what point does that enter the equation?
Along the way. In many cases, after the fact. We don’t set out to try to be fashionable. That’s a by-product or a result. That’s fine. But we’re driven by trying to solve problems, and those problems are primarily functional problems.

We do, as I said, take into account the aesthetic, because that’s really important as an athlete—how do you look? When you look at yourself in the mirror, you want to look like you’re fast, you want to look like you’re strong, you want to look like you’re expressive, you have your own personal style. That’s part of the process, but it’s not like we’re sitting there saying, “We need to create something that is driven by trying to be fashionable.”

I think the authenticity and the uniqueness that comes from solving problems—the form that follows the function—is what makes us interesting from a fashion standpoint. Continue Reading “Can’t Kick the Swoosh: A One-on-One With Nike CEO Mark Parker” »

Shop the Look: Sport Authority

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Shop the Look: Sports Authority

Although we wouldn’t exactly classify ourselves as sports nuts, lately we’ve felt inspired to embrace our inner athletes. Between the 2014 Olympic Games and the Super Bowl XLVIII in New York, February is looking like a very sporty month indeed (and we can’t pretend that Karl Lagerfeld’s couture trainers didn’t inspire us). To dress the part, channel the elevated gym-meets-streetwear we saw on the Gucci, Tom Ford, and Alexander Wang Spring ’14 runways: color-blocked sweatshirts, racing-stripe pants and, of course, the season’s must-have bag – a luxe backpack. Rose gold sneakers and a silver Nike+ FuelBand add a flash of shine. You’ll be more than ready to take on those endless viewing parties in style – and, as luck would have it, comfort, too. Shop our favorite sporty-chic pieces by Fendi, Dion Lee, Lanvin, and more, below.

1. Mary Katrantzou printed stretch-cotton sweatshirt, $770, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Dion Lee striped stretch-crepe skinny pants, $640, available at net-a-porter.com

3. Lanvin rose tone low-top sneakers, $695, available at ssense.com

4. The Row leather backpack, $3,900, available at net-a-porter.com

5. Nike+ Fuelband SE Silver, $169, available at nike.com

Photos: Courtesy Photos