Style.com

August 30 2014

styledotcom In honor of the #USOpen, 19 of the greatest tennis fashion moments: stylem.ag/1rEJAxM pic.twitter.com/zmmoRkICZb

Subscribe to Style Magazine
5 posts tagged "Obedient Sons & Daughters"

Charming, Thy Name Is Hutson

-------

Last week we reported on husband-and-wife team Swaim and Christina Hutson’s decision to cancel their runway show (their lines Obedient Sons and Daughters shuttered early this year, for those of you who don’t have your economic-crisis scorecards handy) and, in lieu of any runway outing, officially announce the name of their new clothing venture with a limited-edition engraved key. Not your normal business proposal, but we were definitely intrigued. Style.com editors received their keys this evening, and the duo’s name for its latest collaboration—Hutson—is about as basic as gets. Sure, something out-there or enigmatic might have piqued our interest a bit more, but classics are what the Hutsons do best, so it seems fitting they chose such an unfussy moniker. It’s still unclear what the key goes to—maybe we’ll find out at our appointment to preview their debut collection early next week. Would a closet full of brand-new Hutson duds be too much to ask for?

Photo: Nicola Kast

The Hutsons Swap The Runway For Appointments, Keys

-------

Last night when we got the news about Sari Gueron canceling her show at the last minute, we mused to the blogosphere about whether our schedules were soon to get even lighter as the countdown to fashion week continued. Well, guess what? Swaim and Christina Hutson, who closed Obedient Sons and Daughters earlier this year but promised to debut a new incarnation for Fall 2009, have now given up their slot of Saturday, February 14, at 9 p.m. Instead, they’ll be doing private press and sales appointments from February 16 to 18. In their charming way, the Hutsons also plan to deliver 25 engraved keys to editors and retailers bearing the name of their new label. We will, of course, let you know the minute we sign the messenger’s log.

Obedient Sons & Daughters Shutters

-------

More bad news on the fashion front: Obedient Sons & Daughters is closing its doors, but the recession isn’t necessarily to blame. Swaim and Christina Hutson’s profile has been on a fast-moving upward trajectory since they launched their label over two years ago: They were CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund finalists last year. Unfortunately, their investor hasn’t provided sufficient capital to support the brand’s growth. “For the last year, we have continuously fought to maintain daily operations and have exhausted all alternatives and at this point we need to move on,” said Swaim. There’s good news for fans of the husband and wife team’s edgy-charming tailoring, however. The Hutsons are currently designing a new collection, the name of which will be revealed when the invitations go out for their debut show scheduled for February 14. “This is a huge risk for us, but we feel that it takes us in the right direction,” said Christina. “We are extremely passionate about what we do and truly look forward to our new focus.” We’re looking forward to seeing their new endeavor, as well.

Five Questions For Swaim and Christina Hutson

-------

When Swaim Hutson launched Obedient Sons in 2002, he never anticipated that some of the most loyal fans of his new menswear line would turn out to be women. Together with wife Christina, Hutson made Obedient Sons into both a closet standby for well-dressed men, and a brand that inspires selective nicking by wives and girlfriends. It was only a matter of time before they began designing expressly for the latter: Daughters debuted for Fall 2008 with womenswear that hewed closely to the elegant so-old-fashioned-it’s-modern menswear aesthetic of Sons. All told, the Hutsons appear to be cornering the market on a highly refined look they describe as “romantic preppy.” Think young aristos in impeccable tailoring garden-partying behind a Brooklyn brownstone. This year, Obedient Sons and Daughters was tapped as a finalist for the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award. The winner of the 2008 prize will be announced November 17; in the meantime, Swaim and Christina Hutson answer Style.com’s questions about life in the top ten.

What made you both want to be designers?
Swaim Hutson: Tennis. I don’t want to be egotistical or anything, but I was a pretty good junior player when I was growing up. Back then, I remember looking at Mats Wilander and Vitus Gerulaitis and just thinking, Man, they’re so cool. Mats in his washed-out jeans and T-shirt and leather jacket, all Swedish, and then Vitus, who was the total party guy. He could have been a better tennis player if he’d partied less, but he looked great.

Christina Hutson: For me, it was movies. I was raised in the country, so I never had any sense that fashion was an option. But I had a few favorite films, like Lolita and Heavenly Creatures, that I’d watch again and again. I feel like something about the ambiance of those movies got me here.

Continue Reading “Five Questions For Swaim and Christina Hutson” »

the internet with texture

-------

When Matthew Siskin started designing Web sites for designer friends under the name designedmemory, it was a way to pay the rent so he could focus on his music career. That was back in 2002. Fast-forward six years and he’s responsible for some of the fashion industry’s most inspired online presences, including the Web sites of his pal Chris Benz, Bensoni, Wren, and CFDA finalists Swaim and Christina Hutson of Obedient Sons & Daughters (up next: Lorick). As the name suggests, designedmemory aims to create emotional connections via the Internet, an approach to site building that involves filling the screen with images of the flotsam and jetsam that Siskin finds in designers’ studios—for example, in the case of the Hutsons, he zeroed in on the jars of candy, assorted vintage harmonicas, and old family photos from the fifties that were hanging around. “My goal is to have the audience forget they’re on the Internet by using more video, more of the screen, more textures, less clicking, and continuous fluid movement. Instead of using photos to show texture, [I say] scan the jacket, lend me the shirt, and I’ll get the real buttons—I want the user to get a visceral sense of everything,” he says.