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July 30 2014

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48 posts tagged "Olivier Theyskens"

No More Theory for Theyskens

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The Top of The Standard Hosts The Unofficial CFDA Awards After PartyAfter four years at the helm of Theory, artistic director Olivier Theyskens is out. The Belgian-born designer, who was tapped by the contemporary megabrand’s CEO Andrew Rosen in 2010 and debuted his first Theyskens’ Theory collection for Fall 2011, will show his final designs for the brand for Pre-Spring 2015. While editors fell hard for his perfect flared pants and signature slim blazers, his namesake Theory line was discontinued when it didn’t sell well in stores. This past February, he showed under the main label.

“It has been an amazing opportunity to work with Andrew and to benefit from his knowledge in this dynamic segment of fashion,” Theyskens told WWD. The designer, who served as artistic director for Nina Ricci and creative director at Rochas (and famously first rose to fame when Madonna wore his dress to the Oscars back in the nineties), is reportedly set to work on new design projects. The details on his new endeavors have yet to be revealed.

Photo: Neil Rasmus / BFAnyc.com

Theory Goes Digital With Stella Tennant

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Stella Tennant for Theory
Stella Tennant for Theory

Theory has tapped the legendary Stella Tennant for its serene (and first-ever) digital campaign. Debuting exclusively here on Style.com, the Lachlan Bailey-lensed campaign includes a collection of ten-second videos (below) featuring Tennant as well as male model Clement Chabernaud. Dressed in Theory’s signature, streamlined Spring ’14 wares—like a white silk blouse and tailored blazer—Tennant glows in the black-and-white clips. “Stella is a perfect fit for Theory, as she is an icon of modernity,” Theory designer Olivier Theyskens, who led the creative direction for the ads, told Style.com. The campaign was shot here in New York and coincides with the brand’s recent shift from Theyskens’ Theory to simply Theory, a decision that was made in an attempt to unify the brand. Theory’s new outdoor and digital campaigns will launch in March, and behind-the-scenes content can be found later today on theory.com.

Celebrities Are House-proud, Too

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BCD cover“I am an interiors geek—I have been slightly obsessed with homes since childhood, and that’s why this project just came naturally to me,” said creative director and now author Rob Meyers on the eve of his book launch. The tome in question is Behind Closed Doors, which catalogs images of twenty-five creative people’s homes, with a twist: They were all taken by the creatives themselves.

Olivier Theyskens, Nicola Formichetti, Courtney Love, Marc Quinn, and Gary Card are among those who participated in Meyers’ first book, which was five years in the making. “I worked with all these crazy talented people and I thought, Hey, I wonder what their homes look like,” said Meyers, whose résumé includes stints with Arena Homme+, POP, Wallpaper*, World of Interiors, and Nylon. “I gave them all disposable cameras and asked them to take pictures of their fave bits in their homes,” said the author of his subjects. “And amazingly, they came through. The cameras came back fully loaded.”

Jeremy Scott FINAL
courtney love

Jeremy Scott’s incredible eighties post-Memphis furniture pieces (above, top) and surreal Ronald McDonald collection; Martha Stewart’s bank of fridges, jars of spatulas, and bowls of eggs; and Courtney Love’s assortment of wedding cake figurines (above, bottom), which includes a pic of her own wedding topper with Kurt Cobain, are just a few of the images included in Meyers’ book. But he insists that this is not what you think: “It’s not like these people have been papped or violated in any way. These pictures are not at all intrusive because [the participants] took the pictures of their homes themselves, and showed as much or as little as they wanted. This comes from their hearts.”

Priced at $29.95, Behind Closed Doors will be available from Rizzoli in March 2014.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Bar Naná to Open With a Bang

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Bar Nana's Olivier Theyskens Uniforms

In New York, a promising nightlife venue or two is always opening during fashion week. As buzz building goes, it’s sort of a no-brainer by now. But designers aren’t just party guests at Bar Naná: The server and hostess uniforms have been designed by Olivier Theyskens (left), the bartender looks by Theory. And when Prabal Gurung inaugurates the space—which was designed by architect Jeffrey White—on Saturday with his post-show bash, he’ll be pumping his brand-new fragrance in through the vents.

Both designers are friends of Kyle Hotchkiss Carone, a 26-year-old nightlife whiz kid and understudy of sorts to Manhattan hospitality veteran David Rabin. They teamed up for nearby Cole’s—which opened in mid-January, in time for last fashion week—and for their latest venture have partnered with Jeffrey Jah and too many other names to list here.

At 2,300 square feet, Naná bears a passing resemblance to the original Double Seven, one of Rabin’s more storied clubs. (Rabin is also behind Jimmy, which is hosting this season’s Proenza Schouler after-party.) Yesterday, two days before go time, it was still noisy with circular saws and power drills. The tufted leather banquettes hadn’t yet been installed, but at least they were there. “Seeing furniture makes me feel much better,” Carone said.

Nana rendering

He was preparing to hang the art, forty or so black-and-white illustrations culled from various editions of Nana, Émile Zola’s canonical tale of a fetching Parisian prostitute who rises to the rank of grand cocotte. (She then meets a dreadful end, but never mind that.) Accordingly, the design has accents of Second Empire—and yet the airy vibe of a party den in, say, Punta del Este. French- and Spanish-language erotica will line one wall. Those hadn’t been installed yet either.

More bar than club, with Latin-inspired tapas on the menu and bottle service available but not really advertised, the venue is a very of-the-moment hybrid—”nightlife for grown-ups,” as Rabin put it. We’ll see if that description holds true over the next few days, which also includes after-parties for Public School on Sunday and Theyksens on Monday.

Photo: Olivier Theyskens; Rendering by Bar Naná architect/designer Jeffrey White

Fashion’s Latest Emissary From The Fountain of Youth

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Dairy InstertStyle.com contributing editor and party reporter Darrell Hartman circles the city and, occasionally, the globe in the line of duty. In a regular column, he reports on the topics—whatever they may be at whatever given moment—that are stirring the social set.

Carlos Souza and Dorian Grinspan“Yes, the lad was premature,” goes a line from The Picture of Dorian Gray. “He was gathering his harvest while it was yet spring.”

I doubt I’m the first person who has, upon meeting Dorian Grinspan, thought of Oscar Wilde’s fable about precious youth. This Dorian is real. The 20-year-old founder and editor Out of Order magazine, he’s been sowing his seeds early—and some of the fashion world’s biggest influencers are taking notice.

Grinspan was born in Paris and came to the U.S. to study at Yale. But while an earlier generation might’ve chosen to wait for a diploma before launching into the world, Grinspan didn’t see the point. “I didn’t come [to the U.S.] wanting to do a magazine. I arrived at Yale and I was really, really bored,” he told Women’s Wear Daily. [Full disclosure: this reporter spent four years at Yale, and did not find it boring.] Grinspan will start his senior year in the Fall, majoring in American Studies, but he recently took an apartment in New York, and says that thanks to some Franco-esque schedule jiggering will be spending just three days a week in New Haven.

Youth these days! Grinspan is already a darling of the industry. WWD is only one of several publications to anoint him an up-and-comer, and his biannual is already carried by the likes of Opening Ceremony and Colette, and the second issue, which Grinspan launched last week, boasts the sort of top-shelf contributors of which many start-up outlets dream. Among the photo credits and profile subjects are Larry Clark, Ryan McGinley, and Olivier Theyskens. These are gets worth bragging about, even if Grinspan is modest, or at least PR-savvy, enough not to. “It’s actually funny to see how accessible these people are and how much they want to help,” he told me at last week’s launch party at Fivestory, an uptown boutique. (His fashion-model looks—literally, as in repped by DNA—aren’t the reason, but surely they can’t hurt.) Gus Van Sant, he added, had been “really interested, and we almost shot something,” but the scheduling hadn’t worked out.

Grinspan has plenty more influential supporters, including fellow editors. “Stephen Gan has been amazing to me,” he said. And after meeting Stefano Tonchi at a party in Cannes last year, Grinspan appeared in W this spring. Starting in the fall, he said, he’ll be writing for the magazine’s website. Quick work. For a moment, Grinspan did pay some dues—as an intern for Carine Roitfeld. Among the people met while working there was photographer Michael Avedon, who shot a story for the new issue. (Avedon is just a year older than Grinspan, and the great-grandson of Richard.)

Grinspan holds himself well—and tends to do so in the right company. Cynthia Rowley, who hosted an after-party of sorts for the magazine at her boutique-cum-sweet-shop, Curious, couldn’t exactly remember how she’d first met him. She was pretty sure his boyfriend had interned at her husband’s gallery. In any case, Rowley said, she’d gotten to know him through “the Brant kids.”

How has Grinspan done it, in an industry with fewer and fewer footholds for young talent? “I don’t think there’s a secret. I feel like everything is so circumstantial,” he explained. When pressed, he added, “Both my mom and my dad have a lot of connections in fashion, I guess.” His mother, a graphic designer, got him interested in clothes and style early on. His father, a lawyer, worked “for a long time” with BCBG. And there’s his godmother, Numéro editor–in-chief Babette Djian. “She’s been great,” Grinspan admits. “We go to fashion shows together if we both have an invite. But I would never call her up and say, ‘Please take me to Jean Paul Gaultier!’ That’s not what I want our relationship to be.”

If things keep going the way they’re going, the occasional missing invite won’t be an issue. And why shouldn’t they? Grinspan has a way about him, evident in the manner in which he politely escorted Clark up the stairs at Rowley’s party and posed with him for photos. Clark, like Rowley, couldn’t recall how he and Grinspan had first started talking, but he did remember meeting Grinspan face to face. “He’s very enthusiastic, but not overbearing at all—just a nice young man,” he said. And one more likely to make a splash than all the others.