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April 21 2014

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7 posts tagged "Pamela Golbin"

Welcome to the ANDAM Family

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Ellen Von UnwerthThe 25th annual ANDAM Fashion Award ceremony will take place on July 3, and today it was announced that seven new judges will be joining the expert panel. John Demsey (group president, Estée Lauder Companies Inc.), Caroline de Maigret (music producer and model), Stefano Martinetto (CEO, Tomorrow London Ltd.), François-Henri Pinault (CEO, Kering), Xavier Romatet (CEO, Condé Nast France), Anne-Sophie Von Clear (Le Figaro), and Ellen von Unwerth (photographer, pictured left) will determine who will win the grand prize of 250,000 euros and far-reaching global recognition. The new team joins such returning judges as curator Pamela Golbin, Colette’s Sarah Andelman, and Style.com’s Nicole Phelps.

Photo: Leandro Justen/BFANYC.com 

Hélène Nepomiatzi Is in the Money

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Hélène Nepomiatzi

You probably don’t know Hélène Nepomiatzi, but you’ve certainly seen her work: She was the hand behind Céline’s Boogie Bag back in the Michael Kors era. She’s also worked with Balmain. But it was Karl Lagerfeld who gave the designer her first break. “He asked me to make a hat out of a handbag for a show [of his eponymous line],” Nepomiatzi recalled yesterday over a coffee in Paris. “I had no idea how I was going to do that, but I said yes.” Other Lagerfeld projects, including a flower bouquet bag and a dog carrier, followed. The art world took note, too: A telescoped python bag Nepomiatzi crafted under her former brand, 31 Février, was snapped up by Pamela Golbin for the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. And the rigid one-off with an inside light she did with Ron Arad for Notify jeans in 2008 touched down at both the MoMA and the Centre Pompidou.

If there’s something a bit otherworldly about Nepomiatzi’s signature style, there’s a good reason for it. The designer happens to know a thing or two about dream interpretation, and symbols tied to money are common currency for her namesake brand. “In France, money is kind of taboo—sort of the way sex is in the U.S.,” she observed wryly. “I thought it would be fun to play with that [notion] in a humorous, provocative way.”

For fall, she’s turned out her now-classic Fort Knox model with tricolor strips of leather anchored by bolt clasps, an homage to her grandfather, who fashioned such hardware.

On a more surreal note, there’s her matchbook purse, as well as a clutch made to look as though it’s dripping in blood. But if that’s a bit strong, there’s another that’s drizzled with gold.

Speaking of coin: Argent, the French word for money, also means silver. In a neat piece of symmetry, the silversmith Christofle recently tapped Nepomiatzi to craft a little passport cover in mirrored leather. Come September, you’ll be able to see how she’s spun that bright idea into the house’s first collection of leather goods.

For more information, visit helenenepomiatzi.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

NYC, Meet DVN

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“Good evening, I’m Iris Apfel, geriatric starlet,” announced said starlet last night at New York’s French Institute/Alliance Française. She was on hand to introduce the speaker for the last of this season’s Fashion Talks, organized by Musée des Arts Décoratifs director Pamela Golbin. Apfel was introducing a designer with whom she’d fallen in love at first sight, a fellow textile obsessive: Dries Van Noten. After they met at a dinner given by Bergdorf Goodman, “I felt that we were transatlantically joined at the hip by an ever-changing bolt of fabric. His clothes are ageless,” she said. “Thank God.”

Van Noten then took the stage for a conversation with Golbin, who was wearing one of the nightscape-printed dresses from the designer’s Spring ’12 collection, which he revealed was one of the most difficult patterns he’s ever had made, given its digital print. He spoke of first finding fashion thanks to his grandfather and father, both retailers, and joining his parents on buying trips to Milan, Paris, and Düsseldorf in the seventies. While his father had hoped that he’d take over the family business, the son found his calling to be more in design than in sales and enrolled at Antwerp’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts. It was the era of rules, when propriety reigned and Chanel was thought the ultimate designer, when an imperious professor could opine, as Van Noten remembered, “Knees are the ugliest part of a woman; never show knees. Long hair is untidy. Jeans are for poor people.” Meanwhile, punk was fomenting in the streets. A group of promising young students, later branded the Antwerp Six (because, Van Noten said, of their unpronounceable names), banded together to show their collection in London in the only show space they could afford: As he told it, it turned out to be a back room behind a phalanx of enormous wedding dresses, so secluded the designers had to take to the streets with flyers to attract a crowd. It’s hard to imagine Van Noten or fellow Six-ers like Ann Demeulemeester and Walter Van Beirendonck having that problem today.

Van Noten spoke of his process (“I always start with the story,” never the muse, which would be too restricting), his studio (in which patternmakers sit on the same open floor as designers), and the importance, for designers like himself who are punctilious about controlling every detail, of having uncontrollable elements in their lives—in his case, his garden and his dog. In an age when many designers are doing fast-fashion collaborations, he insisted he never would. He described seeing one zippered jacket in a fast-fashion retailer selling for less than the cost of the zippers he’d use to make it. And while retailers clamor for more collections each year and business types for more accessories to bolster the bottom line, Van Noten defended his decision to produce only two collections each year, Spring and Fall, to be able to oversee every detail personally. “Making a collection,” he said, “you have to stay awake till the last moment,” adapting all along the way. “Accessories,” he added, “for me should stay accessory. I don’t want to be a designer whose main business is accessories.”

He fielded questions on opening a New York store (it all depends on finding a space), launching a fragrance (wouldn’t rule it out), and licenses (not worth it to him, in most cases). Golbin was thanking the audience for attending when a shout went up from a woman with a buzz cut and earrings the size of tea saucers. “One more question!” she yelled out, before excusing herself with, “Sorry, I’m Italian.” It turned out not to be a question at all, but a message addressed to the designer: “Thank you for existing.”

Photo: Junenoire Mitchell

Where Marc Jacobs And Louis Vuitton Meet

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This year, Marc Jacobs celebrates 15 years as the creative director of Louis Vuitton. And today in Paris, Louis Vuitton—Marc Jacobs, a comprehensive exhibition that explores two innovators and their roles in Vuitton’s 143-year history, opens to the public at the Louvre’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs. (If you can’t make it to Paris before the September 16 closing date, Rizzoli’s accompanying tome, with historical and critical essays by curator Pamela Golbin and Jo-Ann Furniss, a look back through the collections organized by Jacobs and Katie Grand, and more, arrives in April; it can be preordered here.)

“When we were talking through the project, what came out was we really wanted to portray Louis almost like a black and white picture, whereas Marc is like a Technicolor film,” said curator Pamela Golbin, a celebrated author, fashion historian, and the Chief Curator of Fashion and Textiles at Les Arts Décoratifs. The exhibition is divided between a historical view of founder Louis Vuitton himself and a contemporary view of Jacobs’ creation of the house’s ready-to-wear, which he founded in 1997 and has stewarded since. Here, Style.com talks to Golbin about creating the exhibition and the history of the influential house.

What does this exhibition say about the development of Marc’s career at Vuitton?

First of all, what’s so interesting about this exhibition is that it follows two men, so it’s about Louis and he has a whole floor, and then also a second floor is dedicated to Marc. When it came to Marc, it was important for him to be very involved in the project. I did not want this to be a retrospective; it’s more a celebration of what Marc has done in the last 15 years at Vuitton. And it’s incredible that it has already been 15 years. The exhibition is more about the vision that he created for the brand than anything else. And that vision is quite large. It’s not just about designing clothes. Obviously accessories are important, but so is advertising, his artistic collaborations, and just his overall cultural vision. So Marc’s floor begins with Marc’s World. We essentially opened up his head and we did a self-portrait of Marc through all of the cultural influences that he’s had and that he uses for his design process. So it’s like a giant Tumblr page with still images and video images of everything and anything that has influenced him over the years. It’s not at all chronological. It’s thematic. And he even came up with the titles for each of the cases.

Why did you want to steer away from doing a retrospective?
The idea was by no means to say, “OK, in 1997 he did this and he did that.” His story is not chronological. His story is really about an energy and an attitude. He turned Louis Vuitton from a brand into a house. And so what we tried to get across were the steps that he took to get there and important moments. And more importantly, just really his fashion vision for Louis Vuitton that, when he arrived, was already 143 years old. He really created a fashion entity within a luxury brand. Continue Reading “Where Marc Jacobs And Louis Vuitton Meet” »

Milan Vukmirovic: “Fashion’s Like The Titanic”

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On Tuesday, the troika behind the Webster in Miami—Frederic Dechnik, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, and Milan Vukmirovic (pictured)—took over the private salons of the Maison Baccarat to introduce selected friends to the Louis XIII Rare Cask by Rémy Martin. Dressed in a plunging, lace-up black dress by Joseph Altuzarra, Dubreuil noted that despite the fashionable guest list—which included Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Pierre Hardy, Charlotte Dellal, Pamela Golbin, the Traina sisters, and Gabriele Corto Moltedo—this was really just a family affair. (After all, Dubreuil’s family owns Rémy Martin.)

Through dinner, the talk turned to art and architecture. Dellal, the designer behind Charlotte Olympia shoes, described the restoration process on the ironwork in her new London boutique, set to open in early May. “It’s a nineteenth-century shop, so I am restoring it to what I think it must have been then, by way of the forties,” she said. Dubreuil’s boyfriend, artist Aaron Young, regaled guests with tales of his as-yet-untitled work in progress, a gold-plated modern chariot to be impaled atop one of Augustus’ columns at Rome’s Teatro di Marcello at the end of May, around the opening of his solo show at the city’s MACRO museum. That takes care of the high art; a few attendees were as invested in what’s coming up from below. “Fashion’s like the Titanic,” observed the multitasking creative director Vukmirovic, who also designs Trussardi 1911. “The band plays on, but the era of big designer egos is over. Ready-to-wear is becoming what couture used to be. Fashion is direct and the future reality is that everyone is a star, whether or not they have a fashion culture or even means [to buy it]. The only question that matters is, do they like it?” Some like the booze, at least-reports indicate that the Louis XIII, a few bottles of which will make their way to the U.S. in May, has almost entirely pre-sold at €10,000 a pop.

Photo: Stephane Feugère