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April 16 2014

styledotcom New technology aims to make the clothes you see on the street instantly shoppable. Too far? stylem.ag/1jIQKdb

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12 posts tagged "Pierre Cardin"

Maison Michel’s Head Space

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Maison Michel's Paris Pop Up

One of fashion’s most beloved milliners, Maison Michel, whose black felt Virginie fedora is a perennial favorite, finally has a place to, well, hang its hats. Founded in 1936, Maison Michel catered to houses like Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, and Christian Lacroix before permanently joining the Chanel galaxy sixty years later. Thanks to the ministrations of Laetitia Crahay, the house now channels Parisian chic through all manner of headgear, from headbands with veils and sassy little rabbit ears to paint-splattered straw boaters and one-off exclusives in croc or full-on feathers. These are now artfully arranged in an intimate and colorful pop-up “apartment” that quietly opened last month just down the street from the mother ship on the Rue Cambon. Here, Maison Michel is also offering a demi-mesure service for customized pieces, and already its success has been such that the closing date, originally set for March, has been pushed back until late June. More permanent digs are said to be in the works for later this year.

Maison Michel, 19 Rue Cambon, 75001 Paris. www.michel-paris.com

Photo: Courtesy of Maison Michel

Drawing the Bold and the Beautiful

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An Illustration by Tony Viramontes

In September, just before Milan fashion week, 10 Corso Como’s Galleria Carla Sozzani will pay tribute to Tony Viramontes, one of the most revered fashion illustrators of the seventies and eighties. Hailing from Los Angeles, Viramontes worked with everyone from Givenchy, Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, and the House of Dior to Donna Summer, Duran Duran, Janet Jackson, and Paloma Picasso. His high-impact drawings—a product of what the artist, who died of AIDS in 1988, once described as “a state of creative anxiety and insecurity”—stood out for their sassy, sensual punch, and his images’ vivid palettes, moody shading, and extreme expressions seamlessly captured the glamour of the era. Titled “Tony Viramontes: Bold, Beautiful, and Damned,” the exhibition will run from September 6 to November 3, 2013.

Photo: Tony Viramontes, courtesy of Galleria Carla Sozzani

French Castle, American Story

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2013 marks the fortieth anniversary of Le Grand Divertissement è Versailles, the runway battle royal that took place in 1973 between French fashion houses (Givenchy, Dior, Ungaro, Yves Saint Laurent, and Pierre Cardin) and American designers (Halston, Oscar de la Renta, Anne Klein, Stephen Burrows, and Bill Blass). Held as a fundraiser to restore the palace, the evening was attended by everyone from Andy Warhol to Princess Grace of Monaco, and, in addition to a bevy of couture, featured performances by the likes of Liza Minnelli and Josephine Baker (above).

But aside from being, perhaps, the most epic runway spectacle to date, Versailles marked the first time African-American models took a prominent place on the European fashion stage. Last night, in honor of the anniversary, and in celebration of Women’s History Month, the Fashion Institute of Technology hosted a screening of Deborah Riley Draper’s 2012 documentary, Versailles '73: American Runway Revolution. And the historic event’s stars, like Pat Cleveland (below, right), Billie Blair, Norma Jean Darden, and Bethann Hardison, among others, turned out for the film and a lively panel discussion. Continue Reading “French Castle, American Story” »

Plugged In: High Tech Fashion at The Museum at FIT

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When side by side, the words fashion and technology oft conjure images of barely wearable ensembles destined for Lady Gaga. But at the Museum at FIT’s latest exhibition, Fashion and Technology, which opened yesterday, co-curators Ariele Elia and Emma McClendon reveal that technology is a crucial part of our ordinary wares. Spanning 250 years of innovation, the show covers such everyday inventions as the washing machine, rayon, and the zipper. But that’s not to say it’s without sci-fi novelties. For instance, there are jazzy space race-era looks by the likes of Pierre Cardin and Emilio Pucci. Also on display are garments by André Courrèges, who, convinced that space would soon become a hot holiday destination, developed an entire intergalactic wardrobe, complete with a sleek PVC helmet and moon boots.

However, as Diane von Furstenberg notes in a video playing at the exhibition, “Things we thought would be sci-fi exist.” Case in point, von Furstenberg’s Spring ’13 collaboration with Google Glass. Of course, she’s not the only Internet-savvy designer. In 1996, Jean Paul Gaultier created a cyberspace-inspired jumpsuit (pictured above). And don’t even get us started on social media’s fashion influence. Remember the frenzy Burberry caused when it released its Spring ’12 collection on Twitter before it hit the runway?

Perhaps most high-tech is the exhibition’s tiny LilyPad Arduino circuit board, which, when sewn into clothing, is pretty much a wearable computer. “You first see things like wearable electronics in places like athletic wear and the military,” said McClendon, explaining that it’s only later that most designers realize tech-fashion’s artistic potential. A cutting-edge innovation that may take a little longer to catch on? Clothing “grown” from bacteria. Not sure if we’re ready for a “BioCouture” top just yet.

Fashion and Technology is on display at the Museum at FIT from December 4 to May 8.

Photo: Courtesy of The Museum at FIT

The World Of Duro

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“For me, fashion, art, music, textiles, film, etc., it’s all very intertwined. This is basically a collage of things I like, which is what my work is about,” explains London-based designer Duro Olowu of his New York art show and pop-up shop, opening today at Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn’s Salon 94 Freeman Alley gallery.

In the mix, there’s photos by Juergen Teller (Olowu and the photographer have collaborated on various shoots) and art by Laurie Simmons on display, as well as an eclectic selection of books, records, and clothing for sale. “We have limited-edition pieces from my Spring collection, vintage jewelry from Pierre Cardin, textiles from couture fabric makers, and a T-shirt collaboration I did with Tory Burch,” says the designer. Proceeds from the T-shirt (“a mash of prints by both of us,” says Olowu), $75, will go to the charity of their choice. This temporary New York shop is likely to lead to something more permanent in the near future: “I have been looking for a space in New York—this would be exactly the kind of store I would have.”

Duro Olowu‘s pop-up shop is open through March 5 at Salon 94, 1 Freeman Alley, NYC.

Photo: Courtesy Photo