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August 22 2014

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113 posts tagged "Prabal Gurung"

Runway to Red Carpet: Celebs Embrace “Summer Blacks,” and Three New Trendsetters

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080914_Runway_To_Red_Carpet-blogIf you haven’t heard yet, “summer blacks” (©Style.com) are in. Not only has the tried-and-true trend cropped up in the streets, the recent Resort collections, and the Style.com office, but it’s also been making frequent appearances on the red carpet. A glowing Rosamund Pike, who’s pregnant with her second child, chose a black, one-shouldered pleated Prada baby-doll dress for the Berlin premiere of Hector and the Search for Happiness on Tuesday. Heidi Klum rocked a shimmering, form-fitting Roberto Cavalli LBD for Wednesday’s America’s Got Talent postshow event in New York. And the next day, Marion Cotillard took to the red carpet in a black wool Dior dress from the Fall ’14 runway at the London premiere of Two Days, One Night.

While a lot of celebs played it safe this week and stuck to trusty styles that couldn’t fail, a trio of relatively unknown ladies caught our eye. They might not be household names just yet, but these fresh faces piqued our interest with standout styles. On Monday, What If actress Mackenzie Davis stepped out in a look from Nicolas Ghesquiè
re’s Fall ’14 Louis Vuitton collection for the film’s New York premiere. Elsewhere in the city, Charlotte Le Bon posed on the red carpet in a sheer, lace-paneled white frock from red-carpet favorite Elie Saab’s Pre-Fall ’14 lineup at Monday night’s premiere of her new film, The Hundred-Foot Journey. The following evening, Hannah Tointon turned heads in a pale pink satin Spring ’14 Prabal Gurung sheath at the world premiere of The Inbetweeners 2 in London. Needless to say, these Hollywood freshmen are off to a promising start. We’ll be watching, ladies.

Here, all of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Free Agent: How Bankable Is Olivier Theyskens Post-Theory?

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Olivier TheyskensFashion loves a comeback, and since Olivier Theyskens parted ways with Theory, the contemporary American sportswear brand, back in June, industry insiders have been plotting his. Is the 37-year-old Belgian designer being considered for a role at Oscar de la Renta, as has been whispered in New York? Could Milan be an option? Sources say he has taken meetings in the Italian city this summer. Or will he return to Paris, where he enjoyed editorial accolades as the creative director at both Rochas and Nina Ricci?

Tastemakers began falling for Theyskens back in the late ’90s, when he dressed Madonna in haute gothic style for the Oscars. With a reputation burnished by stints at Rochas and Nina Ricci, he was an unlikely fit for Theory, a brand built on stretch pants, but his show quickly became one of New York fashion week’s must-sees. Approval ratings started out strong; there was excitement about scoring clothes with the designer’s famous name on the label without dropping four figures. Over time, however, the reviews became more skeptical. In February, Theyskens presented a Fall ’14 Theory show without his name attached, and four months later the brand and Theyskens severed ties. As it stands now, the designer’s track record is one of ups and downs. Does that jeopardize his prospects? Or could the fact that he has experience across different continents and different markets count as an asset? Now that Theyskens is a free agent, Style.com spoke to fashion influencers about his future.

As he dusts off his résumé, Theyskens is looking at a shifting designer landscape. LVMH and Kering are currently signing on designers both younger and greener than he is. LVMH crowned Jonathan Anderson creative director of Loewe at 29. Christopher Kane and Joseph Altuzarra were 31 and 30, respectively, when Kering made its investment in their burgeoning brands. Yes, Nicolas Ghesquière, at 43 and newly installed at Louis Vuitton, is older than Theyskens, but Ghesquière’s Balenciaga tenure was longer and more successful than Theyskens’ Paris gigs. The other trend he could be contending with: Brands are hiring relative unknowns. See Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, recently hired away from The Row to replace Christophe Lemaire at Hermès, and Julie de Libran, the new woman helming Sonia Rykiel.

Insiders don’t see things quite so dimly and are hopeful that he will find
the right match this time.

“Olivier has a great design sensibility. At a time when many things look like other things, he really stays true to himself—that’s what I respect,” says Ken Downing, fashion director and senior vice president of Neiman Marcus. “I think if there were an opportunity in New York, it would be great for him,” he continues. “It’s not so much about location on the map as it is about a house that will understand his talent.”

Nina Ricci and Rochas

Magali Ginsburg, head of buying & category management for The Corner, which sold Theyskens’ Theory “very well,” sees the designer as “the perfect candidate for a house,” especially because “he [is one of] those designers who when they come on board bring with them a more and more savvy crew of customer followers,” ultimately raising a house’s international reputation.

If not a position at an established house, why not his own label? “I know there are a lot of people who said he wasn’t commercially successful, but I was at Barneys and we sold it,” says Julie Gilhart, now a freelance fashion consultant. “He had a following, and it wasn’t the Nina Ricci or the Rochas customer, it was the Olivier customer,” Gilhart continues. “I’ve always thought that Olivier could do his own thing. When I met him, that’s what he was doing, his own thing. It’s what I want to see for him. He’s one of the great designers.”

As a designer accustomed to the machinery of a big brand behind him, starting out on his own could be daunting. But here in New York, Theyskens has watched other designers—Jason Wu, Prabal Gurung—launch careers by putting red-carpet dresses on the backs of celebrities. And anyone who remembers Irving Penn’s portrait of Nicole Kidman in Rochas knows that Theyskens makes a sublime gown. If he were designing at that level again, Kidman and co. would presumably line up to wear him.

theyskens theory

Still, even with A-list endorsements, it can take a decade for a brand to come into its own, and even then it cannot live on eveningwear alone. Wu has branched out into accessories; Gurung counts knitwear among his biggest developing categories. This is where Theyskens’ experience at Theory could pay off, the thinking being that his design vocabulary is much broader than when he arrived in New York four years ago. And his comfort level with everyday is a lot broader now than it was when he arrived. “It broadened his range,” says Neiman’s Downing. “As we all know, he loves couture and does superlative evening pieces. Theory opened up a new vocabulary about sportswear, and living in New York was good for him to see how people on this side of the pond live, dress, and work. It’s a different sensibility than in Europe.”

Anne Slowey, Elle‘s fashion features director, says, “I like what he did for Theory—there is a place for luxury normcore. But I don’t know if it was right for the brand. Unfortunately, Olivier has been miscast all along the way. He’s either too ahead of his time or too far out in left field. Eventually fashion will catch up with him.”

With the industry firmly behind Theyskens—unlike, say, John Galliano, who, since leaving Dior amid a hate-speech scandal, has received support from some influential corners but has yet to redeem himself in the eyes of American retailers—he’s got a good chance of scoring a new gig. But even if he doesn’t land a job quickly, Theyskens isn’t about to fade from fashion’s collective memory bank anytime soon. An Olivier Saillard-curated exhibition set to open at the Palais de la Porte Dorée in December will feature a dress from one of the designer’s earliest signature collections. For now, there’s the virtual museum that is Instagram. #oliviertheyskens.

Photos: IndigitalImages.com; GoRunway.com

Today’s New York Offers Fewer Drugs, Bigger Dreams

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Karen Elson

Last night in the seventh-floor Living Room at its Times Square location, W Hotels partnered with cultural organization Liberatum to present a “Living New York” panel discussion. Yahoo’s Joe Zee moderated the intimate chat, which included the likes of Karen Elson, Prabal Gurung, architect Karim Rashid, and filmmaker Paul Haggis. The topic of the evening was the impact coming to New York had had on all of their lives.

Although Rashid had a cynical attitude—”New York has changed! There’s a Citibank and a Starbucks on every corner!”—Karen Elson’s comments proved that the model-turned-musician still has rosy eyes for the Big Apple. “Of course New York has changed,” said Elson. “It’s no longer the drug-addled punk days of Giuliani. But that’s what is so amazing. It’s reinventing constantly. In New York, you can be whoever you want to be. In New York, you can dream. That’s the thing for me.”

The conversation took an interesting turn when the digitization of our world—and the impact of none other than Style.com—came into the mix. Said Gurung of media’s effect on the creative class, “It’s a digital age, and I love it. I am so excited where things are going. I even love the narcissism of Instagram. But there’s a group of people who look at Style.com and say, ‘I want to do what everyone else is doing.’ Then there is someone like me who looks at Style.com and says, ‘I want to do something different.’”

Photo: Benjamin Lozovsky/BFAnyc.com 

Diane Kruger Can Be Our Style Teacher Any Day

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Diane KrugerIf you’re going to take style advice from a celebrity, it may as well be Diane Kruger. The actress has topped virtually every best-dressed list known to man, and is friends with such designers as Jason Wu, Prabal Gurung, and even Karl Lagerfeld. Her unique breed of sartorial panache allows her to flawlessly transport shoulder pads into the 21st century, make crop tops look refined, and even demurely work that see-through-shirt trend. The fashion icon, who lives by the style mantra “less is more,” wore a sweet lace bra under her sheer top, allowing her lingerie to take the spotlight. And while we don’t fear the nipplehere at Style.com, not everyone can work it like Rihanna. As Kruger demonstrates, sometimes a coy teaser is saucier than the full reveal.

Via Huffington Post.

Photo: Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images

From Beach To Street, Swimsuits Make the Ready-to-Wear Crossover

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Now TrendingThe lines between swim and ready-to-wear are blurrier than ever these days. This season, we’ve witnessed tastemakers replacing still-happening crop tops with functional yet stylish suits meant to be worn at the beach and off of it. Swapping out your underwear for your bikini isn’t necessarily new—particularly if you’ve ever been a few days behind on laundry—but designers are now emphasizing underpinnings as a key part of the total look. Resort found the likes of Rosetta Getty and Fendi’s Karl Lagerfeld layering triangle tops under silk shirtdresses and mesh vests, while high-waisted briefs turned up at Louis Vuitton, Mary Katrantzou, and Agnona. Sporty bandeaus, meanwhile, proved to be popular among the likes of Alexander Wang, Prabal Gurung, and Preen.

Here, a slideshow of swimsuits making the ready-to-wear crossover.