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September 1 2014

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113 posts tagged "Prabal Gurung"

Zana Bayne Talks Fall ’14 and the First Lady

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Zana Bayne

Since launching her line in 2010, New York-based designer Zana Bayne has been blurring the lines between clothing, accessories, and bondage-tinged harnesses at warp speed. Fresh off her New York fashion week debut, she jetted to Paris, her home away from home, to present her collection to buyers.

“The whole city is black and gold. When I got back to Paris, I thought, Oh, so that’s where this collection came from,” said the raven-haired designer of her Fall ’14 outing, Ornamentalist. The lineup was inspired by fifties-era images from L’Officiel and featured black and croc-embossed cowhide and gold embellishments.

Belts became bras, or were elongated to look like skirts, sometimes with extreme accentuated waists. Some pieces were adorned with tassels, big buckles, or extra rivets, and a lingerie feel was created via elastic details and garter belts.

While in Paris, Bayne welcomed Rei Kawakubo to her showroom—Bayne’s leathers are currently sold at Comme des Garçons in New York, and she’s preparing for a project with London’s Dover Street Market in the fall. Bayne’s wares, which are priced between $150 and $1,500, are also carried by such stockists as Opening Ceremony, Selfridges in London, and Paris’ Mise en Cage.

Bayne aims to clothe more than just fashion’s edgy avant-garde. In fact, the ambitious 25-year-old, who has crafted pieces for both Prabal Gurung and Lorde, is aiming for sartorial world domination. She is expanding her handbag line and splitting her collection into two: the handcrafted runway range Zana Bayne Collection, and Zana Bayne Originals, which will offer seasonless pieces from the archive.

“It’s not just for the cool kids. There are pieces for all sorts of silhouettes. There are garter belts, full-body pieces, and really delicate items as well,” she explained. “I like to make sure there’s a variety.” Bayne hopes there’s a little something in her collections for everyone—even for her dream client, Michelle Obama.

Photo: Courtesy of Zana Bayne 

Insta-Gratification: #NYFW Edition

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #NYFW. See below for today’s picks

Thursday, February 13

Marc’s models enjoying a moment off their feet.>br/>

Cloudy with a chance of Marc Jacobs.>br/>

Ralph’s pastel parade.

Lupita and Naomi pose with Francisco Costa backstage at Calvin Klein.

Wednesday, February 12

Scott’s caption is almost as good as the picture: “DOES RUNNING DOWN THE CATWALK COUNT AS EXERCISE? I HOPE SO!!! #DESIGNEREXERCISE”

Paid the cost to be the Boss.

Janice Alida giving us Mia Wallace vibes backstage at Anna Sui.

Charlotte’s post-Marchesa cornrows complete the video.

Peace, love, and bass. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #NYFW Edition” »

Prabal Goes to Print

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Prabal Spring '14

Yesterday we were intrigued by Prabal Gurung’s Instagram of a burning rose that mysteriously disappeared from his feed a few hours after it had been posted. The image was a teaser for his Spring ’14 campaign—starring Liya Kebede and lensed by Dan Jackson—which will be his first ads to be featured in print publications. Like many designers this season (if you’ll remember, Versace’s Lady Gaga ads broke via Mert Alas’ Instagram), Gurung whet his fans’ appetites by releasing a stream of tweets that slowly revealed the images. While the snaps’ forthcoming appearance in print marks a milestone for Gurung’s brand, his choice to hint at the campaign via social media further proves the Internet’s clout.

Photos: Dan Jackson

On Our Radar: Zana Bayne’s High-Fashion Harnesses

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Harnesses by Zana Bayne

Bondage seems to have a widespread appeal these days—just ask leatherwear designer Zana Bayne. Based in New York, Bayne is known for her leather harnesses, corsets, and various other hard-edged accoutrements, and the likes of Prabal Gurung and singer Lorde both come to her for S&M-inspired accessories. “Whenever I work with Prabal, it’s really about the collection and how the harness can work as an accessory,” offered Bayne, who, having launched her line in 2010, just finished her fifth collaboration with Gurung—she was responsible for the layered PVC and leather harnesses that accentuate the cutout backs of Gurung’s white and pastel Spring dresses. Lorde, meanwhile, donned a leather halter piece in her recently released “Team” video.

For her own Spring ’14 collection, the lookbook for which debuts exclusively here, Bayne crafted a range of wares inspired by the coiled, arching lines of nature’s flora. “I looked at the shapes made by crawling vines on trellises and trees, and wanted to bring the collection to a softer, more feminine place,” said Bayne. Rosettes add a final, romantic flourish to the intricate face coverings, bustiers, and skirts in nude, black, and aubergine.

Somewhat ironically, the designer avoids creating harnesses that might limit movement. “It’s one of the reasons I tend to stay away from pieces that go onto the legs,” said Bayne. “If you can’t move in it, then I don’t think you should wear it.”

Zana Bayne is currently carried at Opening Ceremony, Oak, Lane Crawford, and Coco de Mer, and will soon be available at Selfridges and New York’s Dover Street Market. Her designs are also available online at www.zanabayne.com. Prices range from $20 to $1,125.

Photo: Courtesy of Zana Bayne

The Life of the Party Throws One of His Own

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Hanuk, in front of his work at his opening at The Line

If it was Monday night and you were in an apartment just like yours, only infinitely nicer and better situated, then you’d found yourself at the opening reception of Paintings by Hanuk (one name only, please). Because Hanuk is an inescapable enthusiast of the New York party scene, you were shoulder to shoulder with half of the people you’d find out on any given night: photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and Vogue editor Sally Singer (cohosts, with art PR Bettina Prentice), designers Prabal Gurung, Eddie Borgo, and Camilla Staerk, TV personality Bevy Smith, W‘s Vanessa Lawrence, and everyone else Hanuk has, by way of his party photos, made a momentary celebrity. (The artist, in fact, was flitting around, grouping portraits and snapping as usual—”It wouldn’t be a party without it,” one guest quipped—despite being the main attraction himself.) Hanuk is so well-known as a party documentarian—his signature shot includes him kissing his subject on the cheek, and he’s bussed everyone from James Franco to Philip Crangi to Mickey Boardman—that it might have been news to a few of the attendees that he paints at all. But there, on a large wall at The Line, Vanessa Traina Snow’s apartment-turned-store, were thirty canvases in not-quite-matching pairs. They are brightly colored flat planes with undulating shapes and dots, a bit like Miró filtered through pop. All around, would-be buyers were calling out the color combinations of their favorites.

Before painting, before photography, Hanuk trained as a fashion designer. (He once won an Ecco Domani Fashion Foundation grant for his collection.) But life wended him away from toiles and toward canvas. “I didn’t want to make clothes anymore,” he said last night. “You know, I love making clothes. But that shit costs, like, $8,000. No one’s going to buy it. So I said, You know what? Painting.”

Those paintings, when sold as pairs, did in fact cost $8,000. But Hanuk loved the idea of them splitting up, having them find new partners and new homes, so they were sold individually, too. He was visibly energized by the prospect of new meetings and new acquaintances being made between them. Which, no coincidence, could also describe his entire social M.O., not to mention his party. (He is forever introducing one partygoer to another as he smashes them together to take a picture.) “Like with a key?” he said mischievously when the idea was presented to him. And with that, and camera held high overhead, he dove into a new crowd for the next photo op.

For information, visit hanuk.com.

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com