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August 28 2014

styledotcom Why did Band of Outsiders cancel its fashion show? Scott Sternberg spills: stylem.ag/1C5UL50 pic.twitter.com/KRVfVuIyOf

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189 posts tagged "Prada"

At Cannes, More Feathers Than Fuss

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Feathers at Cannes

Cannes’ red carpet has yet to disappoint. From Lea Seydoux’s jeweled Prada gown to Riley Keough’s refreshing Valentino ensemble, this year’s sartorial oeuvre has been equal parts timeless French glamour and 21st-century chic. One trend that’s caught our eye is feathers. It may not even be fair to refer to it as a “trend,” seeing as feathers are among the most traditional of embellishments (see 18th-century feather boas and twenties-era flapper dresses), but today’s iterations have a thoroughly modern spin. Laetitia Casta’s feminine number stood out at the opening ceremony. In a sea of silk and satin, the fluffy white plumes felt classic yet a bit unexpected, given fashion’s love affair with minimalism. Carole Bouquet donned a slinky feathered Chanel dress, and later in the week, Freida Pinto, Heike Makatsch, and Julianne Moore joined in on the fun.

Perhaps we have Chanel’s Spring ’14 Couture show to thank for the recent feather revival—after all, Bouquet and Moore’s gowns were both plucked from the collection (although the stars nixed the spiky hairdos). Pinto’s full-skirted Michael Kors creation had a slightly beachy vibe, and Makatsch’s off-the-shoulder frock looked especially of-the-moment. With a whole five days of Cannes’ red carpets left, we’re interested to see who else joins the flock.

Sonia Rykiel Taps Julie de Libran

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Julie de LibranUnexpected news comes from the house of Sonia Rykiel today. The brand announced that Julie de Libran has been appointed as artistic director, replacing Geraldo da Conceicao, who spent only five seasons at the helm of the label. Like Da Conceicao, De Libran comes from Louis Vuitton, where she essentially served as Marc Jacobs’ right-hand woman during her five years as the house’s studio director of women’s ready-to-wear. She also headed up Vuitton’s Resort and Pre-Fall collections. De Libran, who did stints at Prada, Versace, Gianfranco Ferré, and Jean-Charles de Castelbajac before her Vuitton tenure, departed LV after Nicolas Ghesquière took the reins. Her first collection for Sonia Rykiel—a house best known for its Parisian irreverence and gorgeous but wearable knits—will debut in Paris during the Spring ’15 shows.

So why the sudden switch? For starters, De Libran has more experience—and industry clout—than Da Conceicao. She was more or less the face of Vuitton’s pre-collections and is familiar with speaking to the press, and designing in line with a particular style or vision. It’s worth noting that the house and First Heritage Brands, which acquired an 80 percent stake in Sonia Rykiel in February 2012, have expressed via a release that De Libran’s hire is part of a “relaunch strategy and accelerated international development.” One might argue that given her name recognition and design track record, De Libran is more qualified than her predecessor to “develop” the label. Furthermore, as Sonia Rykiel’s daughter Nathalie states, De Libran is “a woman, a Frenchwoman. An international woman and a talented one. A woman who enjoys dressing herself and designing for other women.” While one could, I suppose, make a case for reverse sexism here, the fact that De Libran is a femme française who adores fashion (just take a look at the street-style blogs or her Instagram account for proof) and manages to juggle a career and a family allows her to understand the Sonia Rykiel ethos better than a male designer might. Whatever the reason for her appointment, I look forward to seeing what the designer brings to Rykiel in September.

Photo: Courtesy Sonia Rykiel 

Dressing for Fame: Elizabeth Stewart Talks Styling the Stars

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If celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Elizabeth Stewart

Elizabeth StewartIf this past awards season is any indication, Elizabeth Stewart is a practiced pro who shows no signs of slowing down. The woman behind Cate Blanchett’s awe-inducing array of Armani, Sandra Bullock’s colorful body-con dressing, and Julia Roberts’ delightful menswear flourishes, Stewart continues to keep her clients at the top of best-dressed lists while sticking to their individual styles with impressive ease. Having worked at W, WWD, and The New York Times Magazine before entering styling, Stewart’s editor’s eye brings a studied approach to the pull. Here, she talks exclusively to Style.com about how the industry has changed, the role of social media, and why she likes working closely with designers.

How do you think your experience as an editor has shaped your styling career?
It really, really helped me to work in the Paris office of WWD. Spending so much time in ateliers in Paris helped me understand what goes into making a dress.

When did you know you wanted to start styling?
It happened by accident…I was writing for WWD and they needed someone to style the covers of W Europe.

Your first client was famously Calista Flockhart during her Ally McBeal run. How do you feel styling has changed since then?
I still work with Calista. Red-carpet styling is a real job now! It’s become much more of a “thing,” with so much interest in it—and much more of a business.

Does the increasing role of social media ever affect your sartorial decisions?
Social media adds a crazy and kind of fun element to what we do. It does not affect decisions usually, although we refer to it a lot in the room, especially when making a choice we know won’t be popular. I think because I’ve been a fashion editor my whole life, and fashion editors are not only opinionated but think they’re always right, the court of public opinion is not a problem for me. If the world likes a choice, I think everyone is right! And if they don’t, it’s the opposite!

When you’re working with an actress like Cate Blanchett, who is closely aligned with Armani, do you find the brand affiliation constricting? Or does it allow for more options?
It’s actually quite interesting to work so closely with a designer. I love knowing the whole design team and discovering all the resources that they have available. It’s a depth of knowledge I wouldn’t have about them if Cate didn’t have the relationship.

If you were dressing yourself for an awards show, which designers would fill your “try on” racks?
I wear a lot of Proenza Schouler and Prada dresses. So maybe I’d start with them!

Do you have an infamous fashion blunder or red-carpet mishap that has affected your process?
Not really. I always have a backup dress, which I am convinced is why I never need one. My one funny story is that Amanda Seyfried and I decided we liked a certain minidress better backward. I said, “No problem, just make sure you mention it on the red carpet so people know we did it on purpose.” She did, but the press ignored that fact and just wrote about how she had put her dress on backward!

What’s your biggest awards season indulgence?
Indulgence and awards season…oxymoron. Although this last awards season I stopped e-mailing at midnight rather than 1 a.m. And OK, I was eating chocolates the whole time. There’s the indulgence!

How do you honor the various aesthetics of different clients while still staying true to your styling ethos?
I love all kinds of fashion and love the opportunity to work with different aesthetics. That is what is great about dressing other people—I’m not limited to what just works on me. I really like to channel a client and filter her likes.

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com 

Prada Reintroduces Spring ’08 at Dover Street Market NY

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PradaDSM

If you didn’t catch Prada’s Spring ’08 collection (this reporter was still in high school), you now have a second chance at those botanical prints, metallic leaf dresses, and sheer parkas. Dover Street Market has teamed up with Prada for another exclusive women’s capsule, this time reintroducing twelve key styles and prints inspired by that vibrant and memorable season.In true DSM fashion, these aren’t just copies of past designs; each piece is hand-painted and thus one-of-a-kind for a thoroughly modern spin. A first look at the lineup, which hits DSMNY tomorrow, May 8, debuts exclusively here on Style.com.

“I am so delighted to be receiving this second very special collection by Prada for Dover Street Market,” Adrian Joffe, CEO of Comme des Garçons (the parent company of DSM), told Style.com. “Their willingness to create these unique capsule collections for us fills me with endless pride and proves how much they understand what we are trying to do. I think it is fair to say that our mutual admiration and respect knows no bounds.”

The collection is just one element of a wider project that DSMNY is opening in celebration of New York’s forthcoming cultural events and art fairs, including Frieze. Palace Skate’s installation from Tate Britain, Comme des Garçons’ giant Kewpie, and a special exhibit of archive hats by Stephen Jones (which coincides with the launch of his new Wisteria Hysteria perfume) will be unveiled at an open house tomorrow.

The second Prada x DSMNY collection will be available exclusively at Dover Street Market New York, 160 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016.

Regarding Marc Jacobs’ Prada Obsession

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FREE ARTS NYC 15th Annual Art Auction with MARC JACOBS  & SCOTT CAMPBELLMarc Jacobs has a weakness for Prada. Specifically, Marc Jacobs has a weakness for women’s Prada overcoats that feature various embellishments. It’s a look that he’s been cultivating for some time.

Consider, for instance, the black, Japanese blossom-adorned number from Spring 2013 he wore to The Great Gatsby premiere last April. (Anna Wintour—coincidentally? —showed up in an identical garb.) Or take his twinsie moment with Love magazine editrix Katie Grand, in which the pair sported matching rainbow fur coats from Miuccia’s Spring 2014 collection. (Grand also styled him in drag for a spread in Industrie a few years back.)

Jacobs continued his streak at last night’s 15th annual Free Arts NYC Art Auction, which honored artist Scott Campbell. His topper of choice? A blue, monochromatic—and decidedly fur-less—bejeweled number from Spring 2014. Superfan, indeed.