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April 23 2014

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177 posts tagged "Prada"

Fur All Seasons

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Bouchra Jarrar, Liza Minnelli, Atelier Versace

Maybe designers just have Polar Vortex on the brain, but judging by the couture catwalks, it seems that furs are here to stay even for warm weather. For all intents and purposes, the counterintuitive trend was started (as so many are) by Miuccia Prada when she showed colorful fur coats and stoles on both Miu Miu‘s and Prada‘s Spring ’13 catwalks. The furry fad continued for Spring ’14, when Michael Kors, Fendi, Dolce & Gabbana, Tom Ford, and, once again, Mrs. Prada swathed their models in fuzzy tops, scarves, and jackets.

Fast-forward to Spring ’14 Couture, where Donatella Versace proposed a cotton-candy-hued fur stole, as well as a lush violet coat, on her catwalk. Bouchra Jarrar also jumped on board, presenting models wrapped in haircalf and fur vests. “Oh, anything goes on the couture runways,” they’ll say. But hear this: Scorching furs are becoming prime red-carpet fodder, too. Just ask Liza Minnelli. Despite the fact that it was 84 degrees in L.A. on Saturday, the enduring style icon arrived at the SAG Awards in a snuggly fur-trimmed cape. Anyway, we thought we’d start spreading the news…

Photos: Indigitalimages/Patrick McMullan Company

Strike Up the Band

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Fall '14's Banded looks

Almost anything Jennifer Lawrence does gets picked up by the Internet, GIF-ed, reblogged, tweeted, and shared twice over. When the Golden Globe winner showed up on the red carpet last Sunday in all her photo-bombing glory, her black banded Spring ’14 Dior Haute Couture gown garnered so much attention that it evolved into a meme overnight. Dubbed “Lawrencing” (though we’d easily have called it something like “Simonsing”), the meme saw online viewers take to social media to showcase their DIY belted creations fashioned from bed sheets, duvets, and, in instances where cats and dogs were involved, “Lawrenced” towels.

While we typically see garments cinched to accentuate the curves of a female body, the Fall menswear collections are proof that holding it together is no longer just a womenswear tactic. Unconventionally placed belts first showed up at MAN when up-and-coming designer Craig Green sent out leather harness-like apparatuses over his languid wares. And when Miuccia gave vests a similar bi-banded treatment on her Prada menswear runway, we couldn’t resist turning on to this unexpected trend. Rick Owens, too, sent suspendered, strap-detailed tunics down his Paris catwalk yesterday. Will fashion-forward gents jump on the bandwagon when fall rolls around? We’ll be keeping our eyes peeled.

Photos: Getty Images; Indigital Images

Three’s a Trend: Face Time

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facetime

At Prada’s Spring ’14 show, we knew Miuccia was onto something. The giant face murals and face-printed fur coats and dresses sparked a revelation: Who knew the human visage made for such a compelling print? As such, we’re not surprised that the trend is popping up in the Pre-Fall and Fall ’14 menswear collections, but this time around the renderings are more abstract. Guillaume Henry, for instance, sent out sketchy doodles at Carven today. The frenzied black figures drawn on simple, collarless white button-downs seemed a fusion of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Tim Burton. At Stella McCartney’s Pre-Fall fete, the designer said she was inspired by Billy Idol-era punk. McCartney enlisted Gary Hume to draw loopy faces for an ivory crewneck and a black boxy overcoat, truly blurring the line between fashion and art. Finally, at Jean Paul Gaultier, the designer worked a few trends at once, splashing dark, grungy caricatures across a pure-as-snow fur jacket. In addition, his entire lookbook was shot against a cartoonish, hand-drawn backdrop—original art by JPG himself.

Marc Jacobs: Prada Super-fan

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Marc Jacobs in PradaMarc Jacobs loves his Prada. If you’ll recall, in 2011, he posed in the Fall womenswear collection for an Industrie magazine shoot styled by Katie Grand, and he looked decidedly dapper in the flower-print Prada topper he wore to a Great Gatsby screening in April. But last week’s display of affection really takes the cake. While walking his dog in a sunny, 75-degree Saint Barts, Jacobs cuddled up in Miuccia’s covetable Spring ’14 rainbow coat. Sure, it was a little toasty for fur, but hey: If you got it, flaunt it.

Photo: via The Telegraph

World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore

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The many different edifices—many designed by Rei Kawakubo—of Dover Street Market New YorkTomorrow, Dover Street Market in New York opens its doors to the public (including that very committed member of the public who has been camped out in a pup tent on the corner, reportedly for days, waiting). The multibrand store, owned by Comme des Garçons, stocks both the full range of Comme des Garçons labels (which are many), and lines that Rei Kawakubo and her team select and buy for the store—with the sphinx-like Kawakubo often doing the buys herself.

The concept of shop-in-shops at multibrand retailers is nothing new, and many department stores have concessions piloted by individual designers and labels. But few give so much freedom to so many as Dover Street Market. (“We don’t go in for brainstorming,” CdG CEO Adrian Joffe put it dryly to Style.com last year) The result is that walking through the seven stories of New York’s Dover Street Market—or riding up in the glass elevator that was commissioned for the space—is a varied, eye-popping, and often surreal experience. Brands are grouped together in unlikely arrangements, decided by Kawakubo. On the seventh floor, Prada sits next to the skate brand Supreme, the Japanese line Visvim, and near André Walker, the cult designer coaxed out of semi-retirement to design a new collection for the store. And because most if not all of the labels are given license to design their own spaces and fixtures, going from one to the next, even over a distance of only a few feet, can feel like traveling between dimensions or falling down the proverbial rabbit hole. (This is not even to take into account the stairway, designed by the architects Arakawa and Gins, which somewhat resembles a birth canal and is reputed, according to a Comme representative, “to reverse your destiny.”) And this is before you account for the artworks commissioned from the space, including three artist-designed pillars that evolve as they cut through the seven floors, a sound art installation, a mural and more.

The result is a store that is completely unlike all of the existing shopping experiences in New York. But for every person disoriented by the experience, there is likely to be another delighted by the creative chaos. “It’s not overthought. I feel sometime shopping environments can be overcalculated—it’s nearly forced, duty-free luxury,” said Jonathan Anderson, who created the first branded space he’s ever done in the history of his J.W. Anderson label for the store. “I don’t think luxury has to be determined in that way. I think luxury is about the arrangement of ideas, not necessarily the finish.”

Style.com spoke with several designers who created their own spaces—and in many cases, exclusive product—for Dover Street Market New York.

Dover Street Market New York opens tomorrow at 160 Lexington Avenue, NYC.

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's space at Dover Street Market New YorkAnderson, the London-based designer who was recently named creative director of Loewe, was inspired to build his space out of children’s foam-rubber play blocks, all in a shade somewhere between sky and Yves Klein blue. He’d seen children playing with them in a park in Venice, where he’d just returned from his first vacation in seven years when Joffe asked him to do a space on DSMNY’s fifth floor. “They’re from America, weirdly,” he said. “The company did them exclusively in different shapes for us. It was quite fun, actually.”

Dover Street has been a longtime patron of Anderson’s collections, which are also stocked in its London and Ginza, Tokyo, stores. Kawakubo herself selects the pieces to carry which often, thanks to her off-kilter eye, end up being exclusive to DSM. “I always like watching her edit. I love her commitment to fashion, buying from other brands. You have to be on a very different plane to able to do that,” he said. “I think that’s what’s so exciting about the relationship between Dover Street and Comme des Garçons. I think it’s such an interesting exercise, and that’s why there’s no compromise in the buy, there’s no compromise in the store shopping experience.”

Supreme

The Supreme space at Dover Street Market New York

“Supreme is a hard brand for people to categorize,” said founder James Jebbia. “DSM does a great job at taking the best brands in the world and mixing them in their store without categorizing them.”

All that is to say, Dover Street let Supreme be Supreme: graphic, in your face and immediate. Jebbia commissioned Weirdo Dave (né Dave Sandey, but also known as Fuck This Life) to create a large backdrop mural of found images, which has a Tumblr-ish spark. (A few yards away hangs Visvim’s cozy hanging quilts.) How much interaction did Kawakubo have with the space? “Not much, really,” Jebbia said. “Rei let us design the space how we wanted, but she looks at and approves every detail. If she didn’t like something, she certainly would have told us.”

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