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July 31 2014

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33 posts tagged "Pringle of Scotland"

Pringle’s People: Alison Nix And Jake Shortall

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Creative director Alistair Carr recently showed off his final efforts for Pringle of Scotland, his Resort 2013 collection, after taking the reins at the label just a little over a year ago. His Fall collection, however, gets its shining moment in the heritage brand’s new ad campaign lensed by photographer Roe Ethridge. He photographed models Jake Shortall and Alison Nix at gallerist Eva Presenhuber’s house in Switzerland (which, as it so happens, was designed by architects Andreas Fuhrimann and Gabrielle Hächler—also the architects behind the new Pringle of Scotland store opening in late 2012). Here, catch an exclusive behind-the-scenes glimpse (pictured, below) of the shooting of the campaign, which features traditional-style portraits of the models overlaying more risqué, dark images of the duo in Carr’s knitwear.

Photos: Courtesy of Pringle of Scotland

Letter From London:
The Men’s Collections, Day 3

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London’s final day of shows featured outings from J.W. Anderson, Margaret Howell, Pringle of Scotland, and Christopher Raeburn. It also offered a moment to check out the installations from Fashion East, Lulu Kennedy’s young-gun incubator of emerging talent. Tim Blanks took a tour.


Ben Kirchhoff went back to his London roots with Meadham Kirchhoff’s first collection for men (pictured), not only because he started out with menswear in his pre-Meadham days at Saint Martins but also because, when he first arrived in London, he lived in a squat in the general neighborhood of the imposing Georgian mansion where the duo showed their new work. So that glorious vista of green trees and blue sky (yes, the sun shone for a moment) had once been his. And so had the pell-mell, headily fragranced tumble of clothes, boys, flowers, and skip-surfed remnants with which MK filled the eighteenth-century salons. They’re now a fully fledged cult. The cultists were scarcely disappointed, but anyone else who’s been wondering what might be in the pipeline after the suited, booted sartorial conservatism that many of the fashion boys have been working over the past three days might also catch a glimpse of a possible future in MK’s extravagant wrack of the West.

They were sharing the house with the latest crop of designers that Lulu Kennedy was introducing to the world under the Fashion East banner. Downstairs, Duffy showed his silver jewelry with its occult undertones in a room that could have been built for that purpose alone. And Craig Green, fresh out of Saint Martins, showed eerie, homespun clothes—in calico, cheesecloth, cotton knit, and suede screen-printed to a crunchy finish—which suggested ancient rituals in pagan communities cut off from the world. The Wicker Man was an inspiration. No surprises there.

Ritual also infused Tom Lipop’s tailoring with a colorful Mexican twist, or at least the Day of the Dead did, because his models were made up as leering skulls. The boys were packed away on shelves and in drawers, a memorable way to guarantee maximal impact on a minimal budget. Kit Neale managed the same effect by filling his space with a huge fairground snake, which complemented his extravagant prints (particularly liked the lobster ensemble). Idiosyncrasy, playfulness, and obsession rule in the universe of Fashion East. Marten van der Horst’s heavy-metal mutant T-shirts had all that.

Photo: Courtesy of Meadham Kirchoff

Pringle And Alistair Carr Part Ways

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After a little over a year as design director at Pringle of Scotland, Alistair Carr (pictured) will be leaving the house. The departure was “a mutual decision,” according to Pringle CEO Jean Fang, and moving forward, the collection will instead be designed by an in-house team. The house plans to focus on retail development and “roll out smaller stores and emphasize core product, such as luxury cashmere and wool separates with a modern edge.”

For his part, Carr will finish off his Pringle career art-directing the Fall ad campaign, and he will show both his Spring ’12 menswear collection and Resort ’13 collection in June. He’s also going to keep working on the Pringle-sponsored Princess Grace: More Than an Image exhibition at the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco.

Photo: Vincenzo Lombardo / Getty Images

More Details Emerge On London’s Menswear Week

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After cramming a city’s worth of menswear offerings into a single MAN Day for the last few seasons, London is planning to give its standout men’s offerings a bit more room to breathe. The first men’s-only London fashion collections (technically three days, rather than a few weeks) will take place June 15 to 17, with opening programs including a launch event hosted by Prince Charles. In addition to the young London designers who have been showing on MAN DAY—like J.W. Anderson, James Long, Topman, Lou Dalton, and Christopher Shannon—the new opportunity has lured several U.K. brands back to their home turf, including Pringle of Scotland and Nicole Farhi, who have been showing in Milan, and Dunhill. E. Tautz, Hardy Amies, and Richard James will show ready-to-wear collections on Savile Row, and Richard Nicoll (pictured) will debut a menswear collection. The full schedule is now available at www.londoncollections.co.uk.

Photo: John Sciulli / Getty Images

Pringle’s Valley Girls

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For its first time ever, Pringle of Scotland enlisted David Benjamin Sherry, who has shot for the likes of i-D, Dazed & Confused, and Another Man, to photograph its Spring ’12 campaign. Sherry also joined Kati Nescher and Suvi Koponen in front of the lens as one of the models for the menswear campaign. Style.com has exclusive behind-the-scenes footage (above) of the group at work in Switzerland’s Verzasca Valley, with Nescher and Koponen striking a pose against the rocks in Alistair Carr’s asymmetrical-print knits and layered dresses. Images from the campaign, below.

Photos: David Benjamin Sherry