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August 30 2014

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155 posts tagged "Proenza Schouler"

The Best Looks of the Week, According to Style.com Readers

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061514_Look_Of_The_Day_Roundup_blogIn this week’s Look of the Day polls, we shared which trends are on our minds—then asked you to play favorites. On Monday, we called out the best asymmetrical looks from Resort ’15. Who would have guessed Stella McCartney, Reed Krakoff, and Proenza Schouler (among countless others) would all bring back the slashed hemline? McCartney’s winning look, a floaty cutout dress from her Elizabeth Street garden party, looked especially fresh with mixed prints and sky-high platforms. Later in the week, we dedicated Wednesday’s poll to our model of the moment, Jamie Bochert. No doubt you’re seeing her face everywhere these days, from The Line’s new lookbook to the CFDA Awards red carpet, where she stood out among a sea of ball gowns. Stella McCartney won again on Thursday for her well-executed paisley prints—though Emily Blunt’s vibrant Osman dress was a close second. And on Friday, we wished Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen a happy 28th birthday with a roundup of their best looks of late (which was no easy task). Their understated gowns at this year’s Charles James: Beyond Fashion Met Gala naturally took home first prize. Click here to see all of this week’s results, and be sure to check back every day to vote for our latest discoveries.

Joseph Altuzarra Talks His Forthcoming Target Capsule

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Joseph Altuzarra for Target

News broke this morning that 2014 CFDA Womenswear Award nominee and budding master of sensual style Joseph Altuzarra is the latest designer to team up on a capsule with Target. He follows in the footsteps of brands like Proenza Schouler, Prabal Gurung, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and, most recently, Peter Pilotto. “It just felt like the right moment,” offered Altuzarra when asked why he signed on to create the almost fifty-piece collection of ready-to-wear, lingerie, and accessories, which will hit Target stores, the retailer’s website, and Net-a-Porter on September 14. “I’m so focused on building the Altuzarra universe in the luxury market, but the opportunity to bring my world to a larger audience is really exciting,” added the designer, who secured an investment from Kering last year.

Don’t expect the forthcoming capsule to be a greatest-hits range—Altuzarra thinks that would be downright rude. “I didn’t want this collection to just feel like a rehash of things that we’ve done before. That wouldn’t be fair to the Target customer—almost like I didn’t put any effort into it. And it wouldn’t be fair to the Altuzarra customer who might want to buy something new and interesting that we’re not doing for our own line.” Inspired by a world traveler jetting off to far-flung destinations like Paris, Morocco, Tokyo, and Mongolia, the range will include hyper-tailored peplum jackets, pencil skirts, and trenchcoats, all with special details, like embroidery. “I didn’t want to assume that because we were doing a collection with Target that it suddenly had to be a much less interesting product. The collection has to stand on its own, and it is details, volume, and tailoring that make a piece feel rich and special.” The fabrics, too, will lend a luxury feel to the lineup—satin georgette, Swiss dot, slinky jersey, faux fur and leather, jacquard, velveteen, and stretch twill are used throughout.

Mass-market collaborations have done wonders for many an emerging brand, introducing the labels to an entire new demographic outside of the fashion (and shopping) elite. But still, there is always the question of whether a team-up of this kind can dilute a luxury brand. And though the collection is being produced largely in China, this is not a concern for Altuzarra. “Target contacted us because of what our brand stands for, and they were very encouraging about having us really develop a collection that was respectful of what the Altuzarra brand means,” said the designer. “Now, that doesn’t mean that we didn’t think about who the Target customer is and what she’s looking for, but it was really about bringing that customer into our world. There’s an appreciation for overall good product no matter what market you’re shopping in, and Target and I were on the same page about wanting to produce perfect, uncompromised garments.” Said uncompromised garments will all ring in at less than $100. With that in mind, we bet this collection will appeal to loyal fans and, more important, gain him some new ones.

What Is Proenza Schouler? Watch This Film and Find Out

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Proenza Schouler’s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez are a notoriously private pair. However, this season, they allowed directing duo Harrys to accompany them behind the scenes, and document the making of their Fall ’14 collection. Created in collaboration with Le Bon Marché Rive Gauche, the experimental film, dubbed Proenza Schouler IS, debuts here, and it reveals not only the creative process behind McCollough and Hernandez’s latest outing, but a bit of insight into, well, what, who, and why Proenza Schouler is. While the short offers an artful and informative look at the designers’ lives, our favorite part may or may not have been watching passersby try (and fail) to pronounce the brand’s moniker, which is actually a hybrid of McCollough’s and Hernandez’s mothers’ maiden names. Watch the film here, exclusively on Style.com.

A Midway Fall ’14 Model Report

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Ola Rudnicka and Imaan Hammam

We’ve just passed the midway point of fashion month with the Milan shows well under way, and there have been plenty of memorable modeling moments thus far, particularly for newcomers. In general, the top-tier, A-list catwalkers have been more selective with their schedules, leaving room for fresh faces to ascend the ranks. Perhaps the easiest way to break down our favorite rookies is by hair color. By and large, it’s been the season of the platinum blond, with familiar faces Julia Nobis, Ashleigh Good, Juliana Schurig, Sasha Luss, and Devon Windsor making a strong case for bleached tresses (reminiscent of Khaleesi from Game of Thrones). Several new models have been riding Fall’s peroxide wave, too. First is ethereal Polish beauty Ola Rudnicka, who debuted at Prada’s Spring show and landed a spot in the label’s latest campaign. She’s turned up on just about every major runway in each city so far. Rudnicka kicked things off on a high note in New York, walking Jason Wu, Michael Kors, Proenza Schouler, and Marc Jacobs. She went on to do Burberry and Christopher Kane in London, and continued to take Milan by storm, bookending No. 21 on Tuesday in addition to walking Max Mara and Moschino yesterday. Another noteworthy newcomer rocking a flaxen mane is Harleth Kuusik (who currently stars in Proenza Schouler’s Spring ads). In New York, she did turns at Rag & Bone, Victoria Beckham, and Proenza Schouler, then followed those up with J.W. Anderson and Erdem in London. We plan to see a lot more of both Rudnicka and Kuusik next week.

Waleska Gorczevski and Sophie Touchet

Next up is the fiery-tressed group of redheads led by sophomores such as Lera Tribel and Nika Cole (who can forget her teased-out, lamp-shade ’do from Schiaparelli’s Couture show?). They are joined by Quebec native Sophie Touchet, who made an early impact at Thakoon, 3.1 Phillip Lim, MBMJ (a.k.a. Marc by Marc Jacobs), and Burberry Prorsum, then moved on to open Alberta Ferretti and walk in Fendi yesterday. Finally, we’ve got a mixed bag of brunettes, ranging from Dutch stunner Imaan Hammam (she won the genetic lottery with a Moroccan mother and a father from Egypt, and her exotic looks have helped earn her key spots in top-tier casts including Prada, Proenza Schouler, Narciso Rodriguez, and Fendi) to fierce-looking Ronja Furrer (that strong jawline gave her an edge at Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Christopher Kane, and more). And how about this season’s most buzzed-about newcomer? Waleska Gorczevski has a hell of a name and a hell of a presence. During NYFW, the Brazilian model was the first girl out at Marc Jacobs. She also opened Yigal Azrouël and bookended Victoria Beckham, and has continued to rack up an impressive show list including Calvin Klein Collection, Hugo Boss, Proenza Schouler, Christopher Kane, and Fendi. No doubt Paris will take to her serene, slightly quirky appeal.

Aside from Fall’s freshman class of catwalkers, we’ve witnessed plenty of noteworthy cameos by old-school veterans, too. For example, Alexander Wang’s finale featured the likes of Angela Lindvall, Bridget Hall, Candice Swanepoel, Caroline Trentini, Anne V., Hilary Rhoda, and Jacquetta Wheeler. Meanwhile, Karen Elson has been going at full throttle this year, and she continued to dazzle at Tom Ford, Donna Karan, and Diane von Furstenberg. On the other hand, we’ve got Karolina Kurkova, who surprised us by opening Cushnie et Ochs and turning up at Christopher Kane (where she was easily the most experienced model in the lineup). Other highlights included: Kirsten Owen opening and closing Mary Katrantzou; Mini Anden at Proenza Schouler; Liberty Ross and Stella Tennant at Tom Ford; and the triple threat of Carolyn Murphy, Frankie Rayder, and Liisa Winkler at Michael Kors. Last but not least was the brilliant cast at Burberry Prorsum, which featured Edie Campbell in addition to her two younger sisters, Olympia and Jean. Mark our words, those Campbell girls are stars in the making. And speaking of stars, you can’t deny that Kendall Jenner was a total natural on the runways at Marc Jacobs and Giles.

Photos: Indigitalimages.com

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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JEREMY SCOTT Fall 2014 Fashion Show

In the end, perhaps fashion isn’t so complicated. It boils down to this: How do I find my signature and how do I develop it over time? Three things that people have said to me on this subject have stuck in my mind:

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele (stylist): “I get inspiration from Mr. Alaïa, Mr. Lagerfeld. They know, you know? They know. They are not like all these young designers who change every six months. I think this is strange, because when you have talent inside, you never really change.”

Azzedine Alaïa (designer): “It’s inconceivable to me that someone creative can have a new idea every two months. Because if I have one new idea in a year, I thank heaven.”

Riccardo Tisci (designer), speaking approvingly of Hedi Slimane’s tenure at Saint Laurent: “I think Hedi, he wrote his first chapter [i.e., at Dior Homme] in a capital of fashion, and then he took his time off, and then he started from the same page. It’s like when you go to bed and you’re reading a book: You do the little corner, and then the night after, you start from the same page. And the aesthetic that he does really belongs to him. For sure, it is something that doesn’t look like anybody else, and that’s what I like.”

These thoughts were thrown into particularly sharp relief during a busy day of shows in New York yesterday.

MICHAEL KORS
What’s more remarkable about Kors: the fact that he’s now worth a billion dollars or the fact that, after three decades in business, he isn’t resting on his laurels? With his last two collections, he has brought his vision of American luxury into razor-sharp focus.

JEREMY SCOTT
A very different designer from Kors, of course, but in his own way as American as apple pie or Pop Art. Scott has done what you do if you have your own signature: lived through a few seasons where he enjoyed the support of the faithful—and it’s some faithful; he draws the liveliest crowd in town (hey there, Jared Leto)—but didn’t have the full attention of the fashion press. Thanks to his recent appointment as creative director of Moschino, he’s firmly back in the media spotlight. He didn’t waste the opportunity, delivering a collection that riffed confidently on two great American pastimes: sex and sports.

HUGO BOSS
How do you define the signature of a commercial juggernaut, best known for its menswear, which is now making a serious push into womenswear? That’s Jason Wu’s brief at Hugo Boss. He’s started to do it with the collateral: an Inez and Vinoodh-shot campaign; Gwyneth Paltrow as the face of the fragrance. And his debut collection? As Nicole Phelps said in her review, “Wu’s challenge going forward will be to maintain the Boss polish while figuring out ways to loosen up and have a bit more fun.”

ANNA SUI
I would be remiss not to mention Sui in this recap. She is one of the treasures of the New York calendar. Here’s Tim Blanks on what made her latest collection such a decadent delight.

REED KRAKOFF
Krakoff has been giving this subject a great deal of thought lately. After a few collections that felt the anxiety of European influence, he is now focused on creating his version of American luxury. Read Nicole Phelps’ review here.

PROENZA SCHOULER
Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez were part of a pack of young New York designers who broke through in the last decade. When they celebrated their tenth anniversary a couple of years ago, they decided to drill down on their label’s identity, starting with a powerful but understated new logo. Their aesthetic, now reliably their own, is rooted in the contemporary New York art world. It’s no coincidence that yesterday’s show took place at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, a gallery in the West Village.

IT’S RALPH, THOUGH
As it happens, I’m writing this after seeing Ralph Lauren’s show on this snowy Thursday morning. Lauren showed looks from his Polo line alongside his top-end collection today, and the move invigorated him. These clothes were as clear and direct as a Hemingway sentence. If America didn’t exist, Ralph Lauren would have had to invent it.

Photo: Patrick McMullan Company