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6 posts tagged "Prova"

Prova, Now A Pant Pro

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Design what you know. Prova’s Irini Arakas learned that lesson covering up-and-coming talents as an editor at Vogue, and she’s put it to use in her own six-year-old collection. When the scarf and jewelry maker expanded into ready-to-wear for Fall ’11, she started with dresses because that’s what she wore. Fast-forward to Spring 2013, though, and her closet is looking different. “The fact that I’ve designed a pant is pretty surprising to me, considering that I didn’t wear trousers of any kind (including denim) for over a decade,” Arakas told Style.com. The shift began slowly. First came a palazzo pant by Suno, then a black cashmere sweatpant by James Perse, followed by two pairs of vintage high-waisted jeans gifted to her by a vintage dealer friend. “When I finally decided to design a pant,” she continued, “I knew I wanted to make something street-inspired and sporty, the kind of trouser you can slip in and out of when doing dawn patrol at Ditch Plains, so comfortable you want to spend the entire weekend in them.” From the look of this colorful pair in floral-print silk with racing stripes, we’d say she nailed it. For more info, visit www.provanewyork.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Prova

On Our Radar: Prova Scarves

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I fell for one of Irini Arakas’ Prova scarves a year ago. Something about the oversize red and navy houndstooth and its densely beaded black and white fringe made it go with everything. Since launching her brand in 2006, the Vogue editor-turned-designer has added jewelry and dresses to her repertoire. But it’s her new-for-Fall 2011 Prova loops, which combine silk in what she’s rather accurately described as “Vikings on acid in the Arctic Circle” prints with 100 percent merino wool, that I’m finding hard to resist. They come in three styles: a split cowl neck with beaded fringe on both sides, an infinity loop with fringe on just one side, and a very large loop that comes with a zipper; unzipped it’s an even larger scarf. Just the thing for the snow showers they’re predicting for day one of New York fashion week. The loops will range from $465 to $695; interested buyers should contact the Greg Mills Showroom, www.gregmillsltd.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Prova

Fenton/Fallon: The Music Video

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The Harper’s Bazaar-sponsored Accessories Bazaar opens today at the Lincoln Center tents at New York fashion week, where some of the best designers working—including Prova’s Irini Arakas, Albertus Swanepoel, Philip Crangi, and Fenton/Fallon’s jeweler extraordinaire, Dana Lorenz. To spotlight her new Spring ’11 offerings, Lorenz created a short video with fashion’s go-to filmmaker, Sharif Hamza. Model Hil gets all dolled up (those nails! that hair! the 15 or so pounds of Fenton/Fallon goods!) and waits for the phone to ring. Squint just right and she could be the heroine of an early-eighties Robert Palmer video. She’s gonna have to face it, she’s addicted to love—and jewelry, of course. Check out the exclusive debut below.


A Trenchcoat Meeting Of The Minds

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You might say they’ve had this date since the beginning. When Aimee Cho and Irini Arakas first met, it was as fellow fashion writers for Vogue. Flash-forward a handful of years, and they’re both successful designers: Cho of Gryphon ready-to-wear, and Arakas of Prova scarves and jewelry. So when they met again at Vogue‘s Alumni House pop-up during Fashion’s Night Out, working together was the natural progression. “I spent so many years building up Gryphon, just me by myself, that it was nice to be able to work with someone again who I really respect, and who I know is equally creative,” Cho explained. “It was just such a fun experience to be together again.”

They began with the standard Gryphon trench, a best-seller and one that’s already fostered collaborations. (Last season, Cho worked with Sea of Shoes blogger Jane Aldridge, and her mom, Judy, to create a bell-sleeved version.) The design mixes, nearly seamlessly, the sensibilities of both labels. “I haven’t done a lot with natural, found materials like Irini does,” Cho says. “I love the contrast of the sheen of the metal sequins we used, which I think is representative of Prova, but it’s still a very Gryphon thing to have sequins.” “I wanted it to be organic, like my own line,” Arakas chimes in. “Something with found materials, something nature-based right off the bat.” Hence the luminescent tiger’s-eye, quartz, and mother-of-pearl peeking out from beneath the collar (seen in detail above; for a full view, click below), the sequins shining along the belt and back flap. What’s more, the foray into tailored clothing seems to have given Arakas, whose flowing scarves are a favorite of Ikram Goldman and Barneys alike, a nudge in the clothing direction. She’ll bring out a capsule collection of Prova dresses herself next Spring.
Gryphon New York x Prova trench coat, $760, available for pre-order now at www.bergdorfgoodman.com.
Continue Reading “A Trenchcoat Meeting Of The Minds” »

Those in the Know Go to Prova

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Vogue alum and new Ecco Domani Fashion Fund winner Irini Arakas has been quietly making gorgeous scarves and jewelry for her label, Prova, for a few seasons now, but at yesterday’s NYFW presentation—her first—it was clear how far she’s come. It was also clear who’s been behind her for most of that journey. The evening was a who’s who of editors and buyers: Sally Singer and a cab’s worth (at least) of Vogue girls, Colette’s Sarah Lerfel, Barneys New York’s Julie Gilhart, Ikram Goldman (who listed Prova’s scarves as a fall must-have in our Buyers’ Guide), and on and on filled Drive-In Studios to see the latest. So, no promises, but I’d bet we’ll be seeing more of Arakas’ whimsical jewelry—I especially liked the thick necklaces hung with beads representing the see-no-evil, speak-no-evil, hear-no-evil monkeys (monkeys being top of mind for Arakas after a recent trip to Costa Rica, land of the howlers) and the first Prova earrings, dangling clusters of stars. And, of course, those scarves, in beautiful silks and chiffons. Fall be damned, a Pop-ish tulip print and a more abstract pink floral one summoned spring breezes. Arakas herself designed a few other textiles, one covered in woodcut-style clipper ships, the image borrowed and tweaked from a Scandinavian children’s book. Styled on models in Zero + Maria Cornejo dresses and to-die-for YSL heels, even the kids’-book print looked properly grown-up. And bonus points to Arakas for crafting a few papier-mâché mannequins to stand alongside her real-life waifs.

Photo: Courtesy of Prova