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August 28 2014

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105 posts tagged "Raf Simons"

Shop the Look: Future Perfect

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STL Future

After a week of larger-than-life couture shows, we noticed our favorite collections shared a central theme: the future. It wasn’t the stereotypical white-glove, sterile futurism you see in movies but rather an embrace of the brand-new and beautiful things we’ve never really seen before. At Dior, Raf Simons combined Marie Antoinette silhouettes with high-tech fabrics and mirrored eyeliner, while Karl Lagerfeld stayed true to form at Chanel and looked forward, forward, forward. It got us thinking about how we can incorporate new ideas into our own wardrobes. For starters, we’re still coveting Tamara Mellon’s genius leather legging-boot hybrid, and new jewelry designer Sophie Bille Brahe’s sculptural take on the pearl earring is at the top of our wish list. Metallic silver also feels particularly fresh; a modular choker or high-shine sunnies could make even a plain white tee look stunning. Shop all of our favorite forward-thinking pieces by Maison Martin Margiela, Alexander Wang, and more, below.

1. Tamara Mellon Sweet Revenge leather legging boots, $1,995, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Sophie Bille Brahe 14-karat gold ellipse earring with freshwater pearl, $800, available at stylebop.com

3. Alexander Wang zip peel away pullover, $595, available at shopbop.com

4. Maison Martin Margiela silver-tone choker, $995, available at net-a-porter.com

5. Dior So Real metal and plastic sunglasses in Palladium, $505, available at saksfifthavenue.com

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Raf Simons x Ruby Sterling is Coming to a Computer Screen New You

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A meeting of the minds, available for a limited time only. This coming Tuesday, Raf Simons and Sterling Ruby will launch inthenameof.be, a pop-up site carrying their much lauded Fall ‘15 menswear collaboration. Created in partnership with famed lensman Willy Vanderperre (whose promotional video for the launch makes its exclusive debut here) and Simons’ commercial director Charlotte Arts, the shop will offer a new selection of the bleach-spattered, expressionistic pieces each Monday. In keeping with the collection’s DIY pedigree (Ruby and Simons’ mutual roots in punk, and affections for various subcultures), the project is something of a happening unto itself, part e-commerce endeavor, part experiential brick and mortar spot. The latter promises a clubby space in Simons’ home of Antwerp (Arts and Vanderperre also reside there), open weekends only from September 4 through October 13, with a rotating cast of deejays and live performances. The locale will serve as a nod to youthful zeitgeists, and, as Vanderperre tells it, “ignite the spark of the city.” Whatever pieces are not sold on the website at the end of each week will be sent to the physical location (though we’d humbly submit that remainders will be few and far between). Shop swiftly–inthenameof.be comes down September 1.

Inthenameof.be launches Tuesday, July 15, and the shop at 16 Lange Gasthuisstraat, Antwerp, Belgium opens on Thursday, September 4.

Victoire de Castellane Talks Dior’s New Jewels

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Dior

Victoire de Castellane, the cerebral artistic director of Dior Joaillerie, has taken a new approach to high jewelry this season. The collection’s name, ArchiDior, plays on French shorthand for “architecture,” as well as a familiar term for “extreme.” So what does that tell us about the house’s latest jewels, a selection of which debut exclusively here? For starters, de Castellane turned away from the flora that so often informs her wares, and instead focused on the structural details found in Dior’s pristine garments of past and present. In the run-up to couture week, the designer took a moment to talk with Style.com about her childlike approach to design, rings that boast a thousand stones, and what sets this high-wattage collection apart from its predecessors.

What were the inspirations behind this new collection?
I started with a theme, Dior couture, and above all the idea of construction in fabric, which I adapted to gold. For Dior, I usually work with nature-inspired themes like roses, flowers, and so on. But this time I wanted to look at the work Dior did in his collections. Most of all, I had read that [when Dior was young] he wanted to be an architect. In some of his collections, he was really building constructions that were translated as cuts, pleats, geometry, and asymmetrical shapes. I thought it would be interesting to take those ideas and work them in metal, which is nothing at all like fabric.

Did you start with one iconic piece, or was it more abstract?
It was the lines: the Bar jacket was an inspiration, but so were the Ailée, Milieu du Siècle and Corolle lines, and such dresses as the Songe (haute couture, Spring/Summer 1947) and the Junon (Haute Couture Autumn/Winter 1949), among others.

Dior

How did you translate those garments and shapes into jewelry?
I like to injecting an idea and then working around it. There’s a point of departure, but it’s light, and it builds from there. ‘Literal’ is not my style; imagination takes over, and when you see the final piece you forget about [the inspiration] because every single one of them looks different depending on the angle from which you view it. For the Junon earrings, I set diamonds in black gold because I wanted to capture just the festive spirit of the dress, which is covered with paillettes. When it came to the Bar jacket, I designed a bracelet that’s cinched with an emerald and diamond baguettes on the ‘belt’ part. I reversed that same scheme for the ring, using a diamond and emerald baguettes. I incorporated the idea of the Miss Dior dress from Raf Simon’s first haute couture collection, which was covered in multicolored sequins like an Impressionist painting. So I took all the colors on that dress and adapted them to this bracelet. It’s a mix of modern couture colors and the Bar suit by Mr. Dior. At the same time, I wanted to give it my personal touch and slightly different volumes.

How do you reconcile architecture with movement?
Every dress moves in a certain way, but that aspect is just a detail in the final piece. The rest is asymmetrical, as if each piece were actually many jewels in one. Each face is always different.

Whimsy is one of your hallmarks. How does that come through in ArchiDior?
There’s a childlike feeling to the collection because I always work in a very spontaneous way. The technique is controlled, but I always forget my real age—when I’m working I feel like I’m five! There’s always joy. I can never work with something that bores me.

Soiree dress and Corolle Soir Rubis

What did you want to express with this collection?
I wanted to show how I work with figurative abstraction. I felt like I was exploring something that I had never done at Dior before, which was the mastery of curves, working outside of vegetal themes, and mixing unusual colors. Everyone does “couture” jewelry. It’s quite classic to depict animals and flowers. With ArchiDior, I wanted to create something new that had never been done this way. That’s why I thought it was really interesting to start with Dior dresses. And it was a real challenge. Some of our craftsmen with forty years of experience behind them found certain pieces so complex and spectacular that it took a year and a half to complete them. That’s what happened with the Ailée bracelet. And lots of rings have a thousand stones in them. There are so many incredible stories behind these pieces.

What’s the balance between the influence of Mr. Dior, that of Raf Simons, and your own vision?
It’s hard to say—all three are there, but it’s complicated. The foundations are Mr. Dior, there are Raf’s colors because he has a very special palette, there’s my taste, there’s what’s happening in couture now… it’s impossible to quantify. Ultimately, I think that’s something people will judge for themselves.

Photos: Courtesy of Dior, Sophie Carre

And The CFDA Awards Go To…

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Joseph AltuzarraThree cheers for Joseph Altuzarra! The talent won Womenswear Designer of the Year, the top honor at the CFDA Awards, which just wrapped at Alice Tully Hall. Altuzarra, who secured an investment from Kering last year, had some stiff competition in fellow nominees Alexander Wang and Marc Jacobs, but we’d have to say the honor is much deserved. Public School’s Maxwell Osborne and Dao-Yi Chow won Menswear Designer of the Year, beating out Thom Browne and Rag & Bone’s Marcus Wainwright and David Neville, and The Row’s Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen took the Accessories Designer of the Year accolade, triumphing over Alexander Wang and Proenza Schouler’s Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough.

The third time was a charm for Creatures of the Wind’s Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters, who won the Swarovski Award for Womenswear after being nominated in 2012 and 2013—bravo, boys! And to round things out, Tim Coppens and Irene Neuwirth earned the Swarovski Award for Menswear and Accessories respectively. The big winners were in good company, and shared the stage with such honorees as Tom Ford, Raf Simons, and a crystal-clad Rihanna. As host John Waters put it, “Fashion is power.” Tonight’s celebrated designers and icons certainly have a lot of it. Congratulations to this year’s victors and honorees, all of whom are listed below. Don’t forget to check out our complete coverage of the CFDA Awards, here.

WOMENSWEAR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Joseph Altuzarra for Altuzarra

MENSWEAR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Maxwell Osborne and Dao-Yi Chow for Public School

ACCESSORIES DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
Mary-Kate Olsen and Ashley Olsen for The Row

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR WOMENSWEAR
Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters for Creatures of the Wind

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR MENSWEAR
Tim Coppens

SWAROVSKI AWARD FOR ACCESSORIES
Irene Neuwirth

GEOFFREY BEENE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Tom Ford

INTERNATIONAL AWARD
Raf Simons for Christian Dior

FASHION ICON OF THE YEAR AWARD
Rihanna

THE MEDIA AWARD IN HONOR OF EUGENIA SHEPPARD
Paul Cavaco

THE FOUNDER’S AWARD IN HONOR OF ELEANOR LAMBERT
Bethann Hardison

BOARD OF DIRECTORS’ TRIBUTE
Ruth Finley

Photo: Getty Images

Thomas Tait Is Top Dog, But Everyone’s a Winner at LVMH

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Thomas TaitThe atmosphere at the LVMH headquarters was electric this afternoon, as reporters, photographers, finalists, jury members, and designers all mingled before the big reveal of the inaugural LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers winner. London-based Canadian designer Thomas Tait, who won the Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize back in 2010, came out on top. “I was shocked,” he told us while sitting next to his gilded trophy. “I thought, Did that just happen?” Tait is now looking at 300,000 euros of financial support and a year’s worth of business mentoring and production advice, and naturally we were curious as to his next move. “A nice dinner, a good night’s sleep, and I need to call my mom and dad,” he said. But after that, he might take another step toward that handbag he’s been thinking about. Menswear, though, is “not such an emergency.”

The ten runners-up (formerly eleven, but Julien Dossena shuttered his line Atto to focus on his work at Paco Rabanne) were not forgotten—and they were awarded for their efforts. After taking the podium, LVMH’s Delphine Arnault first presented three students, Flavien Juan Nuñez, Peter Do, and Teruhiro Hasegawa, with 10,000-euro grants plus one-year internships with Dior, Céline, and Givenchy, respectively. Then, Arnault announced that the jury, which included designers Karl Lagerfeld, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Humberto Leon, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, had decided to create a special prize of 100,000 euros each for two runners-up. Those honorees were Shayne Olivier of Hood by Air and Indian sisters Tina and Nikita Sutradhar of Miuniku. Currently based in Mumbai, the latter are moving their camp to London next year, with plans to show at London fashion week.

LVMH prize

Even those who walked away without a hefty purse were grateful. “It’s already been incredible in terms of exposure and meeting people—it’s like you win right out of the gate,” mused finalist Chris Gelinas. When asked about the final presentation, in which each designer, accompanied by two models, got ten minutes in front of the jury, he replied, “It felt a little like the Last Supper—all these important people lined up at one long table. I remember thinking, What did I just say to Karl Lagerfeld?

“I really appreciated the very different personalities and expressions. It was very interesting,” said jury member Ghesquière. “They all really have a vision, a story to tell, an expression, and a signature. That’s formidable. As for the jury, there was a real camaraderie,” he added, before slipping out of the room and back to work. Lagerfeld noted that the best part of the process was “having everyone all together, we never see each other because we’re working. But I hate that I want everybody to win and that’s not possible.”

“I am thrilled. It was so interesting and original. All eleven candidates were of such excellent quality; each had their style,” offered Arnault. “They are tomorrow’s great talents.” Asked if she thought the contest would draw even more than this year’s 1,221 candidatures, she replied, “I hope so!”

Photo: Getty Images; Tina Isaac-Goizé