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July 29 2014

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105 posts tagged "Raf Simons"

BREAKING: Thomas Tait Takes the Inaugural LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers

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taitToday in Paris, the eleven finalists for the coveted LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers gathered for the highly anticipated winners announcement. A jury including Karl Lagerfeld, Raf Simons, Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Riccardo Tisci, and others have chosen London-based designer Thomas Tait as the top talent, awarding him a 300,000 euro prize and a year of mentoring. Both Hood by Air‘s Shayne Oliver (who’s up for a CFDA Award next week) and Nikita and Tina Sutradhar of Miuniku have also earned honorable mentions, as well as 100,000 euros each. A big congratulations to the winning designers. Stay tuned for our full report on the announcement, coming later today.

Photo: Filippo Fior / GoRunway.com 

Christian Dior in Black, White, and Color

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Cecil beaton dior

Christian Dior may have been reserved in person, but he left volumes of quotable lines about his work. One example: “Black and white could be enough.” Apt for this particular season, and also for the Christian Dior Museum in Granville, Normandy, where it is writ large on the wall at the exhibition Dior: The Legendary Images: Great Photographers and Dior, open through September 21.

“Museums are almost replacing books. [An exhibition is] like a living book, and that’s especially true for [ones about] fashion,” noted the show’s curator, Florence Müller (Though it should be note that Rizzoli has released a book corresponding with the show, and the tome is pretty impressive in and of itself.) “What’s beautiful about fashion photography is that beyond an iconic piece like the Bar jacket, you have the makeup, the look, and all the refinement of a time that makes you dream. In the end, it’s like a film. It’s magnified beauty.”

Black and white might well have been enough: Hollywood-worthy moments abound in the exhibition. Alongside the Bar suit is Pat England’s original shot of the ensemble at Dior’s first presentation of the New Look, which made the designer a star overnight in 1947; there’s Richard Avedon’s Dovima and the elephants; a Marc Riboud shot of Audrey Hepburn exuberant over a dress in 1959; an early fashion series by Irving Penn; house images by Willy Maywald; iconic images of the model Renée by Henry Clarke, Beaton, Blumenfeld, Newton, Demarchelier, and beyond—all in black and white. Then comes vibrant color, from the first fashion shoots in exotic locales by Norman Parkinson, Corinne Day, Sarah Moon, Steven Klein, Bruce Weber, Mondino, and Inez & Vinoodh, the duo behind the house’s current Secret Garden campaign. But rather than present Dior’s photographs chronologically, Müller sought to bridge past and present thematically, which led to a few surprises—not least a trove of color negatives freshly unearthed from the Elle archives.

Dior

“It’s always thrilling to rediscover something you thought you knew by heart,” notes Müller, who started by leafing through sixty years of fashion magazines—the French editions of Elle and Marie Claire and the archives of Vogue Paris and American Vogue. “In the case of the Bonbon dress from Dior’s winter 1947 collection, we found an image by Emile Savitry we’d never seen before—and then we realized we actually had the dress,” she notes. The Chantecler dress from the controversial 1954 ‘H’ collection is echoed in a vintage photograph by Clifford Coffin, a star lensman in his day (one of his photographs headlines the exhibition). The Trapeze dress from Yves Saint Laurent’s triumphant 1957 debut at Dior is front and center in one display. Another archival picture of a last-minute fitting of a dress once worn by Rita Hayworth finds an incarnation upstairs, in a 2012 iteration by Raf Simons.

“Exhibitions should be a spectacle—beautiful, strange, curious, bizarre,” said Müller, citing John Galliano’s Tibetan-inspired creation and his 1997 Masai-inspired outing. “When you stand back, you realize that a fifties dress could be contemporary, or that the contemporary creation was completely in the spirit of what M. Dior liked. You realize that fashion is not a museum,” Müller concluded. “It’s an ongoing conversation.”

Photo: Courtesy of Christian Dior 

Taking a Chance on Pants: What We Want to See A-Listers Wearing in Cannes

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Now TrendingBetween last Monday’s Met ball, Spring gala season, and the 67th annual Cannes Film Festival (which officially kicked off yesterday), eveningwear has been at the top of our minds lately. But with all due respect to Charles James and the starlets who aimed to honor his legacy by donning Gone With the Wind-style gowns at the Costume Institute extravaganza, we’ve definitely had our fill of dramatic ball skirts. If there’s one thing we’d like to see more of on the Croisette this year, it’s actresses wearing pants. In our opinion, the coolest girls at red-carpet events are the ones rocking stovepipe trousers with tiny tops or sleek le smokings. Take, as examples, Cara Delevingne’s relatively casual Stella McCartney look at the Met or the crisp white Saint Laurent suit that Gia Coppola wore to her Palo Alto premiere. Standing next to one of them in a poufy dress would make almost anyone feel fussy by comparison.

Designers seem to be championing new eveningwear alternatives, too. Raf Simons’ recent Cruise show for Dior opened with a number of dressy pant looks. And we can’t get enough of the snazzy top-and-trouser combos spotted in the Fall ’14 collections of Joseph Altuzarra, Narciso Rodriguez, and newcomers like Rosie Assoulin, Maki Oh, and Isa Arfen. Considering these convincing options, we’re hoping celebrity stylists decide to take a chance on pants.

Here, a slideshow of red-carpet-ready trousers and suits.

Through Cédric’s Eyes: Fei Fei Sun in Dior by Raf Simons

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Each week, renowned artist and fashion illustrator Cédric Rivrain unveils an exclusive drawing on Style.com. See fashion through his eyes, below.

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“Modern cuts at Dior beautifully disrupt the delicate floral embroidery.” —Cédric Rivrain

Illustration: Cédric Rivrain

Fit to Be Tied: Lace-Up Details on the Fall Runways

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Now TrendingOversize, architectural shapes have earned quite a bit of attention in recent seasons, but at times it can seem as though designers are trying to mask or resist the female figure rather than embrace it. And so, it was refreshing to witness a return to sensuality on the Fall runways in the form of curve-enhancing, corset-inspired details. Raf Simons led the charge at Dior, sending out tailored sheaths featuring decorative lacing—apparently a nod to the laces of trainers—that traced along the torso and hips. Tough grommets whipstitched in leather turned up on the Balenciaga, Emilio Pucci, and Hood by Air runways, while Dolce & Gabbana took the trend in a more overtly sexy direction with fluttery chiffon dresses boasting built-in bustiers. Its tightly cinched numbers might require a fainting couch. Similarly, there was a slight fetishistic undercurrent about the tall lace-up boots that accessorized key looks at Antonio Berardi and Versace.

Here, a slideshow of Fall’s toothsome lace-up details.